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Soda Bread

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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Katherine Zeller of Towson wrote briefly that she wanted an Irish soda bread recipe that she had lost. Jane L. Taeger of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she said is "absolutely delicious when toasted and spread with orange marmalade, particularly when you include the orange peel." Irish Soda Bread Makes 1 loaf, 6 to 8 servings butter or cooking spray for pan 4 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons salt 3/4 teaspoon baking soda 3/4 teaspoon baking powder 2 teaspoons grated orange peel (optional)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 10, 2010
One recent morning in Catonsville, Ned Atwater was wielding his bench knife, cutting lumps of dough and shaping them into the two types of bread, Irish brown and Irish soda, that he will offer to Baltimore-area bread eaters on St. Patrick's Day. Like many things Irish, there is a lively debate about what goes in their breads. For example, one traditional version of an Irish brown bread calls for oatmeal. For some, this bread offers a hearty taste of the old country. For others, like Atwater, the loaf can be leaden.
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FEATURES
By Margaret M. Johnson and Margaret M. Johnson,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 14, 2001
Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw loved brown soda bread and once said of it: "Remember that brown bread is a good familiar creature and worth more than his weight in flesh." Perhaps Ireland's greatest culinary legacy, soda bread is but one of many humble and familiar creatures that come to mind when the subject of Irish cooking comes up at this time of year. Along with Irish stew, bacon and cabbage, smoked salmon and potato dishes, soda bread may be the most cherished of Irish fare, but it's buttermilk, one of its key ingredients, that Irish bakers have used for generations to produce not only hearty loaves of bread, but also light and tender cakes, fruit-filled crisps and crumbles, and, lately, even tangy soups and cheesy tarts.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | March 14, 2007
Rough and craggy on the outside, tender on the inside, Irish soda bread is the perfect treat for celebrating St. Patrick's Day. The bread -- so named for the baking soda that makes it rise -- became popular in Ireland in the 19th century, before yeast was in wide use there, Alan Davidson writes in The Oxford Companion to Food. The crosses cut in the top both helped the bread bake faster, and, lore had it, warded off the devil. (A tic-tac-toe pattern works well, too.) Shirley Coleman, a chef instructor at Baltimore International College, showed us an easy version made with raisins, called a "spotted dog" in Ireland.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | March 14, 2007
Rough and craggy on the outside, tender on the inside, Irish soda bread is the perfect treat for celebrating St. Patrick's Day. The bread -- so named for the baking soda that makes it rise -- became popular in Ireland in the 19th century, before yeast was in wide use there, Alan Davidson writes in The Oxford Companion to Food. The crosses cut in the top both helped the bread bake faster, and, lore had it, warded off the devil. (A tic-tac-toe pattern works well, too.) Shirley Coleman, a chef instructor at Baltimore International College, showed us an easy version made with raisins, called a "spotted dog" in Ireland.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 14, 2001
I MADE SOME raisin bread recently. It wasn't very good, especially when compared to my grandmother's. She used to bake raisin bread on weekday afternoons. That was back in the 1960s in the Midwestern town of St. Joseph, Mo., where it seemed to me that all grandparents came from Ireland and where it was common for three generations to live in the same house. Her raisin bread was a treat. I remember arriving home after a hard day battling arithmetic and gerunds at school, and being lifted up by the sweet smell of baking bread.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 16, 2003
When nice little restaurants like the Hunt Cafe in Cockeysville go begging for customers, you understand why the area has chains and very little else. That must be what people want. But for those few of you who don't want to eat with a thousand other people in a large, noisy restaurant and who haven't discovered the quirky little cafe behind the Jiffy Lube, here's what you need to know. The Hunt Cafe opened in the spot where the Artful Palate used to be. It has the same two strikes against it that that elegant little eatery did. It's totally tucked away so it gets no drive-by business, and it doesn't have a liquor license.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 10, 2010
One recent morning in Catonsville, Ned Atwater was wielding his bench knife, cutting lumps of dough and shaping them into the two types of bread, Irish brown and Irish soda, that he will offer to Baltimore-area bread eaters on St. Patrick's Day. Like many things Irish, there is a lively debate about what goes in their breads. For example, one traditional version of an Irish brown bread calls for oatmeal. For some, this bread offers a hearty taste of the old country. For others, like Atwater, the loaf can be leaden.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 19, 1995
Until recently the only burning question I had about Irish food was the one asked in the spirited song "Who Put the Overalls in Mrs. Murphy's Chowder?" Then I came across the soda-bread question. "Who puts buttermilk in their Irish soda bread?"The question is of particular interest in March, the month that every real and honorary Irishman in Maryland encounters the low white loaf. Around St. Patrick's Day, soda bread is the toast of the state. During the rest of the year, it is a very good bread, especially toasted.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | March 2, 2005
Irish soda bread has changed as it has traveled across the Atlantic. Like the Irish in America, it has picked up new habits in the new land. Many turn-of-the-century Irish immigrants changed their names, dropping the O in the ocean. The O'Mahoneys of Ireland, for instance, became Mahoneys in America. But soda-bread recipes have added ingredients. Now Irish soda-bread recipes can be found that have eggs, raisins, currants, even orange zest, in them. This is considered heresy by some sons of Erin.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | March 2, 2005
Irish soda bread has changed as it has traveled across the Atlantic. Like the Irish in America, it has picked up new habits in the new land. Many turn-of-the-century Irish immigrants changed their names, dropping the O in the ocean. The O'Mahoneys of Ireland, for instance, became Mahoneys in America. But soda-bread recipes have added ingredients. Now Irish soda-bread recipes can be found that have eggs, raisins, currants, even orange zest, in them. This is considered heresy by some sons of Erin.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2004
Katherine Zeller of Towson wrote briefly that she wanted an Irish soda bread recipe that she had lost. Jane L. Taeger of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she said is "absolutely delicious when toasted and spread with orange marmalade, particularly when you include the orange peel." Irish Soda Bread Makes 1 loaf, 6 to 8 servings butter or cooking spray for pan 4 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons salt 3/4 teaspoon baking soda 3/4 teaspoon baking powder 2 teaspoons grated orange peel (optional)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 16, 2003
When nice little restaurants like the Hunt Cafe in Cockeysville go begging for customers, you understand why the area has chains and very little else. That must be what people want. But for those few of you who don't want to eat with a thousand other people in a large, noisy restaurant and who haven't discovered the quirky little cafe behind the Jiffy Lube, here's what you need to know. The Hunt Cafe opened in the spot where the Artful Palate used to be. It has the same two strikes against it that that elegant little eatery did. It's totally tucked away so it gets no drive-by business, and it doesn't have a liquor license.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 14, 2001
I MADE SOME raisin bread recently. It wasn't very good, especially when compared to my grandmother's. She used to bake raisin bread on weekday afternoons. That was back in the 1960s in the Midwestern town of St. Joseph, Mo., where it seemed to me that all grandparents came from Ireland and where it was common for three generations to live in the same house. Her raisin bread was a treat. I remember arriving home after a hard day battling arithmetic and gerunds at school, and being lifted up by the sweet smell of baking bread.
FEATURES
By Margaret M. Johnson and Margaret M. Johnson,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 14, 2001
Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw loved brown soda bread and once said of it: "Remember that brown bread is a good familiar creature and worth more than his weight in flesh." Perhaps Ireland's greatest culinary legacy, soda bread is but one of many humble and familiar creatures that come to mind when the subject of Irish cooking comes up at this time of year. Along with Irish stew, bacon and cabbage, smoked salmon and potato dishes, soda bread may be the most cherished of Irish fare, but it's buttermilk, one of its key ingredients, that Irish bakers have used for generations to produce not only hearty loaves of bread, but also light and tender cakes, fruit-filled crisps and crumbles, and, lately, even tangy soups and cheesy tarts.
FEATURES
By Lucy Barajikian and Lucy Barajikian,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 12, 1997
The cool, moist climate of Ireland that turns valleys and hills a lush emerald green calls for sturdy fare. Hence the popularity of such national delights as steaming bowls of nourishing Irish beef stew; baked, fried or roasted potatoes; and glasses brimming with stout -- all good examples of proper "filler" fare.Woven into the fabric of the meal are the baked products of the country, and in Ireland, that means fresh-baked, compact and craggy, full-flavored Irish soda bread -- a perfect addition for your own St. Patrick's Day celebration this coming Monday.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1990
Here's an Irish Soda Bread recipe for B.L. McClean of Phoenix. This one is from Jane B. Clemmens of Towson. McClean wanted a recipe that used buttermilk instead of yeast. Jane says the recipe is very easy to prepare.Irish Soda Bread3 cups flour2/3 cup sugar3 teaspoons baking powder1 teaspoon baking soda1 teaspoon salt1 tablespoon caraway seeds1 1/2 cups raisins3 tablespoons margarine or butter, melted2 eggs, well beaten1 1/2 cups buttermilkMix dry ingredients together. Combine with wet ingredients and mix well.
FEATURES
By Lucy Barajikian and Lucy Barajikian,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 12, 1997
The cool, moist climate of Ireland that turns valleys and hills a lush emerald green calls for sturdy fare. Hence the popularity of such national delights as steaming bowls of nourishing Irish beef stew; baked, fried or roasted potatoes; and glasses brimming with stout -- all good examples of proper "filler" fare.Woven into the fabric of the meal are the baked products of the country, and in Ireland, that means fresh-baked, compact and craggy, full-flavored Irish soda bread -- a perfect addition for your own St. Patrick's Day celebration this coming Monday.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 19, 1995
Until recently the only burning question I had about Irish food was the one asked in the spirited song "Who Put the Overalls in Mrs. Murphy's Chowder?" Then I came across the soda-bread question. "Who puts buttermilk in their Irish soda bread?"The question is of particular interest in March, the month that every real and honorary Irishman in Maryland encounters the low white loaf. Around St. Patrick's Day, soda bread is the toast of the state. During the rest of the year, it is a very good bread, especially toasted.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1990
Here's an Irish Soda Bread recipe for B.L. McClean of Phoenix. This one is from Jane B. Clemmens of Towson. McClean wanted a recipe that used buttermilk instead of yeast. Jane says the recipe is very easy to prepare.Irish Soda Bread3 cups flour2/3 cup sugar3 teaspoons baking powder1 teaspoon baking soda1 teaspoon salt1 tablespoon caraway seeds1 1/2 cups raisins3 tablespoons margarine or butter, melted2 eggs, well beaten1 1/2 cups buttermilkMix dry ingredients together. Combine with wet ingredients and mix well.
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