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By Elena Conis, Special to Tribune Newspapers | May 1, 2010
Want strong bones? Eat foods high in calcium and vitamin D, get plenty of exercise and maybe steer clear of soda. In recent decades, as soda consumption has displaced consumption of other drinks — particularly milk — studies have consistently linked soda consumption with weaker bones. Now, scientists are trying to figure out how and why. One theory is that a component in cola might cause bone to deteriorate; another is that people who drink soda simply drink (and eat)
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 17, 2014
I was phoned the other night in middle of dinner by an earnest young man named Spencer, who said he was doing a survey. Rather than hang up, I agreed to answer his questions. He asked me if I knew a soda tax would be on the ballot in Berkeley, Calif. in November. When I said yes, he then asked whether I trusted the Berkeley city government to spend the revenues wisely. At that moment I recognized a classic "push poll," which is part of a paid political campaign. So I asked Spencer a couple of questions of my own. Who was financing his survey?
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NEWS
January 12, 2004
IT'S WET and it's bubbly and it's bereft of nutritional value: You knew it was junk food whether you grew up calling it soda, pop or tonic, and you drank it anyway. Should today's kids? Not during school. That's why schools shouldn't be selling it. Common sense would seem to link the frequent consumption of soft drinks with the growing problem of childhood obesity, and many school districts are under pressure to give up their soda sales and forgo the lucrative revenue. America's pediatricians last week joined this call, but they're Johnny-come-latelies: The nation's two largest school districts, Los Angeles and New York, last year banned soda sales during the school day. A new California law prohibits soda sales during school hours in public elementary and junior high schools beginning this July; Texas, Florida and Hawaii already have restrictions.
NEWS
July 7, 2014
Unbelievable! You can't get a Coke with your hot dog on the 4th of July because fascist Howard County Executive Ken Ulman has decided its unhealthy for you ( "Howard vendors chafe at rule against sugary drinks," July 3). I think he deserves something unhealthy - like a kick in the shins. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
EXPLORE
May 14, 2013
As a parent of a ninth-grader at Glenelg High School, I am saddened and flabbergasted that the PTA is taking such a hard-line stance against student health and, indirectly, academic performance. I was equally shocked by the soda and candy machines moved into my child's school this year - especially as they directly conflict with the message taught in health classes. I truly think it comes down to money that the school and boosters want to make. I read one reader's concern as to the negative impact of proposed wellness changes.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Melissa Healey's article, "NYC's failed cap on sugary drinks prompts soul searching" on April 4 draws an interesting parallel between New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's improbable public health battle against obesity and our nation's long history of public health activism and success stories. Taking on the "larger forces" through policy - whether the tobacco and alcohol industries or "Big Food" - is a winning model in public health. The impact of taking on corporate interests is best appreciated in individual behavioral change.
NEWS
October 10, 1990
A 66-year-old convenience store employee in Northwest Baltimore was shot in the chest yesterday after she defied demands for money from two men and threw a cup of soda at one of them, police said.Venisel Elghazzawi of the 4400 block of Hallfield Manor Drive, Parkville, was treated at Sinai Hospital and released, according to a spokeswoman.The spokeswoman said the bullet passed through Ms. Elghazzawi's left breast and out her side.Sgt. Mike Dunn of the Northwest District said Ms. Elghazzawi was working at the 7-Eleven in the 3600 block of Dolfield Avenue about 3:30 a.m. when two men entered the store.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare | December 2, 2006
A second soda-bottle bombing within four days in Harford County has caused $500 damage at a grocery store in Cardiff, authorities said yesterday. The most recent incident occurred Thursday at Klein's Supermarket on Dooley Road, when two devices were detonated at 7:30 p.m., authorities said. Five customers and 25 Klein's employees in the store were not injured when one device exploded in the soft drink aisle and a second went off in a trash can on the sidewalk near the entrance. "These are chemical bombs, destructive devices constructed in a plastic soda bottle," said W. Faron Taylor, deputy state fire marshal.
NEWS
By Deborah Toich Chris Kaltenbach Candy Thomson | March 27, 1991
It's amazing what you can find in your soda, without even trying.The day started out with a quest to find a Diet Sprite, something myteen-age daughter assured me tasted "good, not like those other dietsodas."Knowing that the vending machines in my office building don't carry Diet Sprite, I decided to make a quick run through the Severna Park McDonald's to try and pick one up before work. To my dismay, they don't carry Diet Sprite either. Being a little late, I ordered a regular Sprite and buzzed up Ritchie Highway to the office.
TRAVEL
By Joy Tipping and Joy Tipping,The Dallas Morning News | December 23, 2007
ARCADIA, Okla. -- You can see the big, glowing thing from a couple of miles away on historic Route 66, and as you approach from the east, you wonder what it is: A rocket ship at an amusement park? Surely not out here in the middle of nowhere. A giant, glowing Q-tip, like they used to have at the Johnson & Johnson factories? Nope, wrong shape. You get closer, and it becomes clear. It's an enormous soda bottle, 66 feet tall (in homage to Route 66), complete with a straw. When the bottle is lighted at night, it changes colors, morphing from soft grape to lemon yellow to cherry red. If ever there was an instance of advertising matching substance, this is it. The store behind the bottle, Pops, which opened in August, sells nearly 500 kinds of soda pop, along with soda-fountain-type food, shakes, souvenirs and gasoline.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | November 12, 2013
I'm a sucker for Baltimore-themed cocktails. I'm compelled to order them, in fact, no matter how unusual, random or potentially deadly they may turn out to be. So obviously, when I spotted Boyle's Baltimore Water on the menu at the Chasseur in Canton, I had to give it a go. And? Well, who knew a drink lovingly named after the infamy of our Mobtown tap water could taste so delicious? Bar manager Michael Zabora takes a rather cheeky approach to paying homage to our fair city. "I started making the drink a few years ago, when [Pinnacle Red Berry vodka]
NEWS
October 16, 2013
I am no economist but I fail to see why the bottle tax has been so disastrous to Santoni's Supermarket in Highlandtown while apparently sparing other city markets ( "Santoni's closing Highlandtown store," Oct. 13). (Make no mistake: My mobile friends loved Santoni's. Being on the less mobile side, I walk to Fresh and Green's when I need produce.) I have to ask if it could it possibly be that Santoni's has been charging more than its competitors for sodas and other items, leaving Mrs. Raven and Miss Oriole to load up on Santoni's hand-butchered meat and great pies and then, on the way home, swing by Safeway to fill up the car trunk with 7Up, Pepsi and the like - all on sale or cheaper, tax or no tax. And, yes, I am cynical, but did Santoni's lose money by giving transportation to low-income residents of city "food deserts" who wanted to peruse his expensive soda stocks?
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | June 16, 2013
When a friend told Brad Siegler and Kim Murray that a brewery in Baltimore was throwing a party for the public Saturday afternoon, distance was not a factor for the Columbia couple. "It sounded fun," Murray said at the Peabody Heights Brewery in Abell, where beers like Red Cent Amber and Knuckle-Buster IPA flowed freely, as a rock band played and a mobile food truck sold chicken and waffles. The party was also a coming-out party for the six-month-old brewery and its partners, Stephen Demczuk, J. Hollis Albert and Patrick Beille.
EXPLORE
May 14, 2013
As a parent of a ninth-grader at Glenelg High School, I am saddened and flabbergasted that the PTA is taking such a hard-line stance against student health and, indirectly, academic performance. I was equally shocked by the soda and candy machines moved into my child's school this year - especially as they directly conflict with the message taught in health classes. I truly think it comes down to money that the school and boosters want to make. I read one reader's concern as to the negative impact of proposed wellness changes.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Melissa Healey's article, "NYC's failed cap on sugary drinks prompts soul searching" on April 4 draws an interesting parallel between New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's improbable public health battle against obesity and our nation's long history of public health activism and success stories. Taking on the "larger forces" through policy - whether the tobacco and alcohol industries or "Big Food" - is a winning model in public health. The impact of taking on corporate interests is best appreciated in individual behavioral change.
EXPLORE
April 8, 2013
As a Foreign Service family who lived for six years in Central America, where no soda was allowed on our children's school campus, we were very surprised to discover that the highly rated Howard County schools still sell soda in vending machines. Soft drinks contribute nothing nutritionally, but can do a lot of damage to our children's health. Yet, schools selling soft drinks send a clear message that these are okay to consume. As a parent who discourages my children from drinking soft drinks, having a soda machine at school undermines my efforts as well, making our jobs as parents that much harder.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2000
Nobody ever claimed that soda pops were health foods. But now a Harvard University scientist reports that teen-age girls who drink sodas have a higher risk of bone fracture than girls who do not and that physically active girls who drink cola beverages have the highest fracture rate. The study, to be published today in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, does not establish a cause-and-effect relationship between drinking sodas and sustaining fractures, say experts. It lacks many details scientists would have liked to have seen, they add. Despite these limitations, the finding shouldn't be ignored, they say. It speaks to a concern many health professionals have - that girls in particular aren't getting enough calcium in their diet; that they're drinking soft drinks instead of milk; and that insufficient calcium intake is heightening their risk in later life for thin, fragile bones that break more easily.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
For the first time in the 20-year history of Westminster Fallfest, vendors at the four-day celebration will be prohibited from selling carbonated beverages, a move that has drawn criticism from a local nonprofit group.The Westminster Optimist Club has complained to the nine-member Fallfest Committee, criticizing its decision to bar the club and 17 other food vendors from selling carbonated drinks."Fallfest is one of our biggest moneymakers," said Henry Lysy, Optimist president. "With this policy, they take about 50 percent of the funds we usually raise at this event and basically give the money to another organization."
NEWS
March 23, 2013
Your editorial about a recent court decision invalidating the so-called "soda ban" in New York City ("Bloomberg loses the soda battle, not the war," March 12, 2013) offered an incomplete explanation of why the judge ruled the ban "arbitrary and capricious. " The judge referred to "loopholes," which you addressed, but that only tells part of the story. The judge also stated, "it excludes other beverages that have significantly higher concentrations of sugar sweeteners and/or calories on suspect grounds.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
The beverage industry is claiming victory after a New York City judge on Monday overturned a ban on super-size sodas and sugary drinks Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg had championed as a way to combat obesity among residents. But the battle is hardly over. Mr. Bloomberg, whose campaign against sales of such drinks in containers larger than 16 ounces became one of the signature public health initiatives of his administration, has garnered worldwide attention for his efforts and in the process amplified the conversation about the link between sweetened drinks and obesity that likely will go on long after he leaves office at the end of this year.
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