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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
For asking students questions rather than giving them answers, Socrates was offered exile or death. He chose death. Now, 24 centuries later, adversaries are still trying to kill off his teaching method.This time, the dispute arises at American law schools, where a caustic version of the Socratic method, once the standard, is on the wane. Disliked by students who are put on the spot, condemned as hostile to women and minorities, the teaching style again is at risk of exile.The teaching practice evolved from Harvard Law School, where students were questioned on legal arcana in what often felt like an interrogation.
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NEWS
June 29, 1997
Disney boycotted for wrong reasonsThe boycott against Disney is well deserved -- though not for the bigoted and prejudicial reasons given.Disney deserves to be boycotted because it ran from American workers to Haiti, where a big 37 cents per hour is paid to Haitian workers.Savilla TeigerBaltimoreSocratic method is not discriminatoryAs an attorney, I could not let your recent article (`Socratic method still debated,'' June 9) concerning attacks on the Socratic method of teaching law students go without comment.
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NEWS
June 29, 1997
Disney boycotted for wrong reasonsThe boycott against Disney is well deserved -- though not for the bigoted and prejudicial reasons given.Disney deserves to be boycotted because it ran from American workers to Haiti, where a big 37 cents per hour is paid to Haitian workers.Savilla TeigerBaltimoreSocratic method is not discriminatoryAs an attorney, I could not let your recent article (`Socratic method still debated,'' June 9) concerning attacks on the Socratic method of teaching law students go without comment.
NEWS
June 22, 1997
If no-smoking killed pub, why do others thrive?I feel compelled to reply to Mitch Hooper's letter entitled, "Restaurant smoking curb infringes liberty." (The Sun in Howard, June 1). Mr. Hooper makes it sound as if the Dodder & Poddle, in Columbia, closed because of the county's clean air act. How absurd.What the writer failed to mention was that there were other more important factors at work as to why this pub closed. As they say in corporate real estate, survival depends on three things -- location, location, location.
NEWS
June 22, 1997
If no-smoking killed pub, why do others thrive?I feel compelled to reply to Mitch Hooper's letter entitled, "Restaurant smoking curb infringes liberty." (The Sun in Howard, June 1). Mr. Hooper makes it sound as if the Dodder & Poddle, in Columbia, closed because of the county's clean air act. How absurd.What the writer failed to mention was that there were other more important factors at work as to why this pub closed. As they say in corporate real estate, survival depends on three things -- location, location, location.
NEWS
June 13, 1997
Parole meeting should show signs of remorseNathaniel Johnson Jr., an award-wining writer serving a sentence for armed robbery and attempted murder, did not demonstrate an attitude in June 3 Opinion Commentary article that would convince me to vote for his parole.Mr. Johnson, be advised that "cheap politicians" were not the ones who came up with the idea of allowing crime victims to be present at parole hearings. Crime victims and their advocates lobbied legislators for the right to participate and then fought for enforcement of these rights.
NEWS
December 20, 2010
In your article "Universities are slowly tiptoeing into taming costs with efficiency" (Dec. 19), the argument is made that universities, by increasing class size, reducing professors and lectures, adding teaching by teaching assistants and increasing computer grading, can maintain educational standards while saving money in these tough economic times. This thesis is so oversimplified as to be simply false, or, at best, true only in a few limited cases. I cannot speak authoritatively to whether this higher education solution is ever possible in chemistry courses and some other natural sciences, but in the humanities and social sciences it is always educationally destructive.
NEWS
July 20, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of the last extensive interview conducted with John F. Kennedy Jr. It was published in the March issue of Brill's Content magazine.BRILL: In the current issue [of George magazine] you've got [former] President Reagan on the cover. Is that something where you said, "Let's do that?"KENNEDY: What really happens is, we have meetings with the senior staff and in a kind of Socratic method, we vet the ideas. And the ones that stand up under that scrutiny, and the ones [for]
NEWS
June 21, 2003
Rudolf Franz Hoelker, 91, a member of Wernher von Braun's original team of rocket engineers, died June 14 in Newton, Mass. Trained as a mathematician, Dr. Hoelker worked on the trajectory aspect of the guidance system that steered the Saturn rockets on the Apollo moon flights. He was among the scientists who in 1945 accompanied von Braun from Germany to the United States and what is now NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. He was born in Halle in Westphalia, Germany, and studied mathematics, physics and mathematical logic at the University of Muenster, where he also taught and received his doctorate.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
James L. Dollar, an Anne Arundel Community College administrator, died Friday of heart failure at North Arundel Hospital. He was 61 and lived in Arnold. Named dean of the School of Arts and Sciences in 1999, he was also chairman of the school's humanities division and a philosophy teacher. "Jim had a stellar career. He was an exemplary community college teacher and professional," said Martha Smith, the college's president and a friend. "He cared about his students' success and challenged people to move to new and different levels.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
For asking students questions rather than giving them answers, Socrates was offered exile or death. He chose death. Now, 24 centuries later, adversaries are still trying to kill off his teaching method.This time, the dispute arises at American law schools, where a caustic version of the Socratic method, once the standard, is on the wane. Disliked by students who are put on the spot, condemned as hostile to women and minorities, the teaching style again is at risk of exile.The teaching practice evolved from Harvard Law School, where students were questioned on legal arcana in what often felt like an interrogation.
FEATURES
By Suzanna Stephens | March 26, 1995
TCPhiladelphia (bus) storyAn environmentally friendly shuttle-bus service has begun operating between popular sites in downtown Philadelphia. The service, called Phlash (pronounced Flash) Downtown Loop, travels along a route in the Center City section. The buses are powered by compressed natural gas, which contains up to 95 percent less carbon monoxide than gasoline or diesel fuel.There are more than 30 stops, including the Pennsylvania Convention Center, City Hall, Logan Circle, Rittenhouse Square, the Academy of Music, the South Street area, Independence Hall, Penn's Landing on the Delaware River and the Old City.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2002
The Baltimore County school system is launching three initiatives this year to improve the performance of low-performing students, particularly minorities whose academic achievement has long trailed that of other students in the district. One program will push underachieving high schoolers into rigorous, college-preparatory work. Another gives students online preparation for college entrance exams. The third program provides teachers with diversity training over the Internet. "They're enhancements," Superintendent Joe A. Hairston said at a recent meeting of parents, where the programs were unveiled.
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