Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSociology
IN THE NEWS

Sociology

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
May 26, 2012
Cristal Fortino, of Manchester, earned her degree in sociology from McDaniel College, and took part in commencement ceremonies on May 19. Fortino, who was a stay-at-home mom to her two children for 15 years, enrolled at McDaniel College after her husband lost his job due to downsizing. It was around her family's dinner table that the decision was made for her to return to school, and a scholarship from McDaniel allowed her to achieve that goal. Fortino technically graduated in December, but took part in the May commencement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 7, 2014
Corey Andrews Age: 19 Occupation: Community Activist Education: Sociology - Howard Community College Previous elected office/Community involvement: Candidate for Board of Education 2012, Member of numerous committees to draft and review school system policies Goal as Board of Education member: To work collaboratively with members of the Board and citizens of Howard County to provide the best education possible...
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Dr. Doris R. Entwisle, a professor of sociology and engineering studies at the Johns Hopkins University for nearly half a century and a pioneer in the field of the sociology of education, died Tuesday of cancer at her Towson home. She was 89. "Doris exemplified dignity and was extremely personal. She was a very warm person but did not wear that on her sleeve," said Dr. Karl L. Alexander, who collaborated with Dr. Entwisle on the Beginning School Study, which examined the personal and educational development of about 800 city first-graders over 25 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Dr. Doris R. Entwisle, a professor of sociology and engineering studies at the Johns Hopkins University for nearly half a century and a pioneer in the field of the sociology of education, died Tuesday of cancer at her Towson home. She was 89. "Doris exemplified dignity and was extremely personal. She was a very warm person but did not wear that on her sleeve," said Dr. Karl L. Alexander, who collaborated with Dr. Entwisle on the Beginning School Study, which examined the personal and educational development of about 800 city first-graders over 25 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
Donald Simon Frank, a retired sociology professor whose combat experiences in World War II led to him becoming a pacifist, died of cancer Wednesday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, where he had lived since 1997. He was 80. Mr. Frank was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. He was a 1942 graduate of Forest Park High School, where he had played football and earned the nickname of "the Green Hornet." He enlisted in the Army and served with a combat engineering unit in the Pacific.
FEATURES
By Arlene Ehrlich | May 30, 1993
And now, for those who have mastered the basics of supermarket sociology, a few guerrilla tactics for pursuing an advanced degree:* Before you leave the house, make a detailed list of everything you need to buy. (Later, when you get to the store, you can forget where you put the list.)* Dress for success. Wear a leather vest unbuttoned over your chest. Augment the outfit with lots of gold and silver chains and a prominent tattoo that reads, "Nobody Bothers ME!" This look works especially well for women.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine BTC and J.D. Considine BTC,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1996
"Performing Rites: On the Value of Popular Music," by Simon Frith. Harvard University Press. 352 pages. $27.95.One of the great terrors of junior high school math was the proof. As none of us particularly cared what, if y equaled 26, x might turn out to be, the notion of supporting those calculations with layers of mind-numbing logic seemed especially perverse. Sensing this, the teachers tried to put our puny efforts into perspective by observing that university-level mathematicians were expected to work lengthy proofs demonstrating that one plus one did, in fact, equal two.Many of us, I suspect, gave up then and there.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2002
The Rev. Charles Chapman Herrman Jr., a Methodist minister who taught urban sociology at Western Maryland College for 20 years, died Saturday of melanoma at Belle Grade, his home in Pylesville. He was 66. Born in Salem, N.J., the son of a DuPont Co. executive, Mr. Herrman was raised in Pennsville, N.J., and Pensacola, Fla., where he graduated from high school in 1954. Mr. Herrman, who was called "Chap," earned bachelor's degrees in industrial engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1958, and divinity from Emory University in Atlanta in 1960.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Edward L. "Mac" McDill, former chairman of the Johns Hopkins University's sociology department who was also the founding director of the Hopkins Center for Social Organization of Schools, died April 25 of prostate cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Mays Chapel resident was 82. "Mac was a friend and a mentor. He was the pillar of the department and held it together when we went through some pretty rough times," said Karl Alexander, who succeeded Dr. McDill as department chair.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 6, 2009
John Iverson Toland Jr., a retired sociology professor and former chairman of the department of sociology at Towson University who also volunteered at a Govans food pantry, died Saturday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 79. Dr. Toland was born in Birmingham, Ala., and was raised in Atlanta and Columbia, S.C., where he graduated from high school in 1948. After serving in the Navy from 1949 to 1951, he served in the Army from 1953 to 1955.
NEWS
By Diane Kuhn | July 10, 2013
What does it take to become a good doctor? In the midst of a period of health care reform and primary care shortages, how we do to encourage talented students who want to give back to the community to go into medicine? Since the 1920s, the Medical College Admissions Test, or MCAT, has played a central role in the admissions process for prospective medical students, helping admissions officers make tough calls about which students are best qualified to train as physicians. Initially developed as a way to reduce drop out and flunk out rates, the test now helps differentiate between applicants with near-perfect grades, college leadership positions and shadowing experience.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Edward L. "Mac" McDill, former chairman of the Johns Hopkins University's sociology department who was also the founding director of the Hopkins Center for Social Organization of Schools, died April 25 of prostate cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Mays Chapel resident was 82. "Mac was a friend and a mentor. He was the pillar of the department and held it together when we went through some pretty rough times," said Karl Alexander, who succeeded Dr. McDill as department chair.
EXPLORE
May 26, 2012
Cristal Fortino, of Manchester, earned her degree in sociology from McDaniel College, and took part in commencement ceremonies on May 19. Fortino, who was a stay-at-home mom to her two children for 15 years, enrolled at McDaniel College after her husband lost his job due to downsizing. It was around her family's dinner table that the decision was made for her to return to school, and a scholarship from McDaniel allowed her to achieve that goal. Fortino technically graduated in December, but took part in the May commencement.
NEWS
June 25, 2011
Professor Richard Vatz complains about the alleged anti-conservative bias in higher education institutions ("The diversity hoax: On campuses conservatives need not apply" June 23). He should look instead at the ideological imbalance in the corporate boardrooms and ask himself one simple question from Sociology 101: which institution carries the most weight in American society? Curtis Price, Baltimore
EXPLORE
June 10, 2011
Marcie Miller Castaneda graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree with a communications major, corporate communications concentration and a sociology minor from Drexel University on June 10. Her mother, Kely Miller, is a resident of Catonsville Manor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 6, 2010
Daniel Randall Beirne, a West Pointer and retired Army officer who later had a second career as a University of Baltimore professor of sociology and history and was considered an authority on Baltimore history, died Wednesday of heart failure at his East Lake Avenue home. He was 85. Dr. Beirne, whose parents were both writers, was born in Baltimore and raised on Berwick Road in Ruxton. His father was Francis Foulke Beirne, the longtime Sun and Evening Sun editorial writer, whose Christopher Billopp columns entertained newspaper readers for decades.
NEWS
By Diane Kuhn | July 10, 2013
What does it take to become a good doctor? In the midst of a period of health care reform and primary care shortages, how we do to encourage talented students who want to give back to the community to go into medicine? Since the 1920s, the Medical College Admissions Test, or MCAT, has played a central role in the admissions process for prospective medical students, helping admissions officers make tough calls about which students are best qualified to train as physicians. Initially developed as a way to reduce drop out and flunk out rates, the test now helps differentiate between applicants with near-perfect grades, college leadership positions and shadowing experience.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 6, 2010
Daniel Randall Beirne, a West Pointer and retired Army officer who later had a second career as a University of Baltimore professor of sociology and history and was considered an authority on Baltimore history, died Wednesday of heart failure at his East Lake Avenue home. He was 85. Dr. Beirne, whose parents were both writers, was born in Baltimore and raised on Berwick Road in Ruxton. His father was Francis Foulke Beirne, the longtime Sun and Evening Sun editorial writer, whose Christopher Billopp columns entertained newspaper readers for decades.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | January 2, 2010
WILLIAM EVAN, 87 Professor and peace activist William M. Evan, 87, a professor emeritus of sociology and management at the University of Pennsylvania and a peace activist, died of kidney failure Dec. 25 at Martins Run, a retirement community in Media, Pa. Dr. Evan joined the Penn faculty in 1966. He taught in the School of Arts and Sciences and the Wharton School, and consulted with major corporations and government agencies on issues including organizational design and crisis management.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.