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NEWS
March 14, 2012
As a psychologist who has spent more than a year in the Middle East, I have been following with great interest the commentary following the massacre in Afghanistan by the U.S. soldier last Saturday ("Killings of 16 appall Afghans," March 12). Almost all of the opinions expressed by leaders, pundits and talk show listeners betray a fundamental cultural myopia. They seek to find the pathology in the individual and not in the wider society. We think that the soldier must suffer combat fatigue from multiple deployments or suffer from post traumatic stress disorder or another mental illness and rush to declare the incident an isolated one of a rogue soldier.
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NEWS
September 15, 2014
The National Football League received more domestic violence-related bad news last week with the arrest of Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, who was charged over the weekend in Texas with reckless or negligent injury to a child. The allegation is that he used a tree branch or "switch" to spank his 4-year-old son, who suffered cuts and bruises to his back, buttocks, ankles and legs. Given that this was Texas, a state not normally given to condemning spanking of children as a disciplinary tool, one presumes that the injuries the preschooler suffered — because he allegedly failed to share his video game with a sibling — were pretty harsh.
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NEWS
December 6, 2011
With all due respect to Jay Hancock , his recent statement regarding how high income Maryland residents should be taxed illustrates a number of fallacies that drive policies that will destroy this nation: "Should the 1 percent at the top of the pole pay much more in personal income tax to help rescue the society that has been so good to them? Of course. But that taxation needs to be done at the federal level, where there is less opportunity to avoid it. " Mr. Hancock writes ("Something's making Maryland's millionaires leave," Dec. 4)
NEWS
September 13, 2014
The warning signs of relationship violence are around us every day. But, today an elevator surveillance video has brought it to the forefront as a national conversation - a conversation that is long overdue, but one that I have lived before ( "Sixteen female senators urge Roger Goodell to adopt zero-tolerance policy against domestic violence," Sept. 11). On May 3, 2010, my friend Sharon Love lost her daughter Yeardley when she was brutally beaten to death by her ex-boyfriend.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
In a truly moral and civilized society, people would interact exclusively through persuasion. Force would have no place as a means of social interaction. Yet the only thing that removes force from the menu is the personal firearm, paradoxical as that may sound. When I carry a gun, you cannot deal with me by force. You have to use reason and try to persuade me, because I have a way to negate your threat or use of force. The gun puts a 100-lb. woman on equal footing with a 220-lb.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
To those opposed to tougher Maryland gun laws, I can only say that we have to start somewhere ("Battle lines form in gun debate," Dec. 19). The answer cannot be that criminals will get guns anyway so law-abiding people must have them as well to protect themselves. We are living in a society where the character and moral differences between the good guys and the bad guys are blurring. The country is awash in paranoia and fear. The reasons for the good guys to be armed may be purer and nobler than the reasons for the bad guys.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
I enjoyed reading your editorial about the Beretta company building a new plant in Tennessee ( "Weighing the loss of Beretta jobs," Jan. 30). The problem is that even the cities that attempted to ban handguns entirely were among the most violent in the nation, so it is foolish to think that gun control laws have any effect on crime. Moreover, the violence is being committed by residents, so you one can't claim that legal gun owners are coming in and taking advantage. Clearly, something else must be causing the problem.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
A Civil War-era photo of a woman with a Confederate flag and land records of some of the oldest homes in Howard County are among the more than 15,000 items being packed up as the Howard County Historical Society shuts its doors Sunday in preparation for its move to a new home. The organization is relocating from one Ellicott City location to another. Its archives, research library and offices will constitute a historical center in the Charles E. Miller library, scheduled to open in mid-December.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2012
Mr. Bauer still has conceptual difficulty in dealing with the issue of extending the right to civil marriage to those of the same gender ("Supporters of gay marriage confuse facts with opinion," letter, June 14). Nowhere in his letter can he articulate an answer to the key question of what harm society would suffer from extension of this right, let alone entertain the thought of how society might actually benefit. If anything, his letter inadvertently makes the case for the opposite of what he advocates.
NEWS
November 17, 2011
It's about time The Sun reported on the millions of dollars spent on unused textbooks in the Baltimore County school system ("Officials question millions spent on Balto. Co. tests and curriculum," Nov. 12). This is something that has been going on for a long time. I retired as a classroom teacher and mentor for Baltimore County in 2001. While in my last position, mentors often discussed the many books on various ability levels and subjects that were left in their original packaging in the book room.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Karen A. Stuart, a Library of Congress archivist who earlier had been head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society where she also was associate editor of the Maryland Historical Magazine, died of cancer Aug. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 59. "As head librarian at the Maryland Historical Society, Karen always took her job seriously, trying hard to help researchers who sometimes had fairly arcane questions of projects," said Robert J. Brugger, an author and Maryland historian who is a senior editor at the Johns Hopkins University Press.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
When a 60-year-old amateur historian died in February, dozens of Linthicum Heights residents decided they wanted to do something to remember the man who remembered and preserved the history of their community. Oscar "Skip" Booth was a local librarian, former president of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society and had recently written his 100th historical "vignette" about Linthicum when he died unexpectedly of complications from a stroke. Soon after Booth's death, members of the Linthicum-Shipley Historic Association, a nonprofit that funds community projects, hatched the plan to build a memorial bench and place it along a local trail, said Kate Graf, secretary-treasurer of the group.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For the Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Garrison Keillor lounged by a backyard pool, sipping a glass of wine. Isaac Bashevis Singer sat at a dining room table and ate homemade pea soup. Edward Albee arrived with a new boyfriend in tow. Over the past four decades, the likes of Larry McMurtry, Frank McCourt, Grace Paley and Lucille Clifton, along with a dozen or so other well-known authors and poets, have made themselves at home during visits to Columbia. Many of them lingered after their readings to share a meal, and some even stayed on as overnight houseguests.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
The focus will be something old, something new on Sunday, June 1, when the Horticultural Society of Maryland hosts its 23rd annual Garden Tour, “From Manor to Modern:  Garden Design in Columbia and Ellicott City.” The tour, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, focuses on one of Howard County's oldest communities, Ellicott City, and one of its more modern and ever-changing, Columbia. This year's walking and driving tour will take visitors to seven private gardens that range from a tranquil arboretum surrounding an 18th century country estate to innovative contemporary gardens tucked away in suburbia.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | May 6, 2014
Josiah Taft of Edgewood is the first-place winner in a national patriotic essay contest sponsored by the National Society of Colonial Wars Inc. Josiah, the son of Brad and MaryAnn Taft, is 13 years old and in eighth grade. He has been home-schooled for eight years. The society annually sponsors an essay competition open to seventh- and eighth-graders. Essays are 250 to 500 words and are judged on subject matter, interest, spelling and punctuation. Each year a new topic is announced; this year's was Colonial Medicine.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A group of youngsters got their hands dirty, learned important lessons about animal welfare and got to see the fruits of their fundraising efforts during a visit last week to the Baltimore Humane Society in Reisterstown. Through a field trip sponsored by the Columbia Association, approximately 40 elementary school students went to the nonprofit no-kill shelter Monday to tour the facility and volunteer for the day. The students took advantage of a day off from school to clear debris and perform gardening duties on the 365-acre campus, then enjoyed a meet-and-greet with animals.  "It's terrific," said Wendy Goldband, a spokeswoman for the shelter, who guided the children on their visit.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
The only "good and substantial reason" citizens should need in order to obtain a concealed carry permit for their firearm is that we live in a society some of whose members have no respect for the lives of others ("U.S. appeals panel upholds Md. gun law," March 22). As it stands now, the only people who pack guns are the criminals who prey on innocent citizens knowing that the odds of their victims carrying a weapon in Maryland are close to zero. So criminals have nothing to fear.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
It takes more than guns to produce the increased frequency of mass killings such as the school shooting in Newtown, Conn. ("What must be done," Dec. 26). As a society we are at risk of accepting the lethal combination of firearms in the hands of disturbed and marginalized individuals as the norm. If we are serious in our effort to remedy this rising tide of "random" violence, we must look beyond the proliferation of assault weapons and the policies that enable their ownership. The problem is much deeper than that.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
Clearinghouse The Volunteer Center for Anne Arundel County is a clearinghouse for information about volunteering throughout the county. Help is needed to assist with the database, newsletter and new youth service activities and with maintaining online volunteer matching applications. Call Fay Mauro at 410-897-9207, e-mail fay@volunteerannearundel.org or go to VolunteerAnneArundel.org. Boy Scouts Troop 323 of Annapolis, chartered in November, needs volunteers. Volunteers must be older than 18, may be male or female, and must pass a background check.
NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 24, 2014
Alberta Stornetta loves history. Years ago, when members of the Arnold Preservation Council said they were interested in learning about the area's history, Stornetta eagerly took on the project. But she was surprised to find there wasn't much out there on the subject. "I started looking around and found only wills and deeds," said Stornetta, who is a member of the preservation council. "Nothing very interesting. " She said that Annapolis had history "up the ying-yang," but Arnold's history seemed to be lost - or at least buried.
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