Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSocialist Party
IN THE NEWS

Socialist Party

NEWS
By ALISSA J. RUBIN and ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2006
BELGRADE, Serbia and Montenegro -- The coffin slid down the luggage conveyor after a baby carriage, several large cartons and suitcases as a few friends gathered on the runway under a fine snow yesterday to welcome home the body of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. The coffin was draped with the Serbian flag and put into a rented hearse for the trip to a state hospital morgue where the body would be held overnight. Milosevic will be buried Saturday in his hometown of Pozarevac.
Advertisement
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 25, 1991
Paris. - The left, all but extinguished in the United States during the 1980s, when bearers of the dreaded ''liberal'' appellation were pitilessly hunted down in their congressional districts, has survived the same decade very nicely in Western Europe. Now troubles have begun there, but of a different order than in the U.S.Socialist parties have governed Spain and France for all, or nearly all, of the past decade. Social Democrats continue to dominate Scandinavia, and provide a plausible and electable opposition in West Germany.
NEWS
By Laura Silber and Laura Silber,Special to The Sun | December 23, 1990
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Slovenia's imminent departure from Yugoslavia has been announced so often that it may go unnoticed when or if it really happens.Today, nearly 2 million Slovenes vote in a referendum on independence and are expected to overwhelmingly support going their own way.But whether the tiny republic actually leaves depends on whether it can achieve a consensus within the federal Parliament and with the leaders of Yugoslavia's other republics. It also hinges on the 12-nation European Community, which will accept any outcome as long as it does not endanger stability in the volatile Balkan region.
NEWS
July 17, 1993
The election for the lower house of parliament tomorrow is the most decisive in Japan since 1955, when the Liberal Democratic Party began an unbroken 38 years of one-party government. Whether that era has ended, is perpetuated or is starting to crack will be decided.The LDP is intertwined not only with big business, the bureaucracy, gangsterism and corruption but also with Japan's unparalleled economic growth and personal economic security of the past 38 years. How to throw out the bath water while saving the baby is the Japanese voters' dilemma, and the parties have not made it easy.
NEWS
October 7, 2000
Here is the concession speech given by President Slobodan Milosevic of Yugoslavia: Respected citizens, I have just received the official information that Vojislav Kostunica has won the presidential election. The decision was made by the state body which has the constitutional authority to do so, and I believe that this decision must be respected. I would like to thank all those who gave me their trust and voted for me in these elections, but I would also like to thank those who did not vote for me because they took a huge weight off my chest, the burden of responsibility which I have carried for a full 10 years.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | May 18, 1995
Paris. -- Francois Mitterrand, who quit political life yesterday, passing France's presidential powers to Jacques Chirac, has been the most interesting Western political figure of his generation.The great figures who preceded his generation, DeGaulle, Churchill, Roosevelt, Adenauer, Monnet, as well as his younger contemporary, Mikhail Gorbachev, all left their countries fundamentally changed. They won wars, saved national honor, liquidated empires, launched political unions. Mr. Mitterrand left France changed, obviously -- but with nothing fundamental changed that would not, in one way or the other, have changed without him.He is an artist-politician, like DeGaulle and Churchill (and Vaclav Havel)
NEWS
November 8, 2004
David Shulman, 91, a self-described Sherlock Holmes of Americanisms who dug through obscure, often crumbling publications to hunt down the first use of thousands of words, died on Oct. 30 in Brooklyn, N.Y. Jesse Sheidlower, editor at large of the Oxford English Dictionary, said Mr. Shulman contributed uncountable early usages to the 20-volume lexicon. Mr. Shulman considered the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue his real home. He recorded his finds on index cards, sending them to the OED when he had produced a bundle of 100 cards.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | May 10, 1993
Paris. -- There has been a moral collapse of the West European left, implicated in its near-total political collapse. The Socialist movement, which a half-dozen years ago was in power in nine of the 17 major West European nations, survives today as a member of only six European governments.In two of those it is threatened. In Italy, where the entire political system is on the brink of a quasi-revolutionary reconstruction, the Socialist Party is deeply compromised by corruption. Former Socialist Prime Minister Bettino Craxi has had to take refuge in parliamentary immunity against the corruption charges brought against him by magistrates.
NEWS
By ROGER BURBACH | October 13, 1991
Moscow. -- While Boris Yelstin's political ascendancy continues to grab international headlines, a new array of political forces is quietly staking out positions in opposition to him. Only weeks ago these groups stood shoulder to shoulder in front of the Russian "White House" blocking the advance of army tanks. Today they even see each other as political antagonists."We are no longer dealing with the dead weight of the Communist party," explains Maxim Meyer, editor of the weekly newspaper Kommersant.
NEWS
By Susan Milligan and Susan Milligan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 1997
SOFIA, Bulgaria -- In the hospitals, doctors have stopped performing all but emergency surgery because they don't have anesthesia or the money to buy it." 'Urgency' becomes a very relative term," says Dr. Slavyan Nikolov, a surgeon whose salary at First City Hospital is $10 a month. "There is no medicine. People without money have no options."The same diagnosis applies to all of Bulgaria, where a critical economic situation and political unrest have almost paralyzed the country. There is hyper-inflation, which means that Bulgarians without hard currency can barely afford to eat. The banking system has collapsed.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.