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HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2014
Inviting a friend to play on a tire swing can be difficult for autistic children, but with special kinds of playgrounds cropping up in Maryland and around the country, it may become easier. The Shafer Center, a school in Owings Mills for autistic children ages 2 to 8, recently installed a playground intended to help children with social interaction and motor skills. Specialized equipment can "foster social interaction" between autistic children, who sometimes have a more difficult time interacting socially and using social cues, experts say. "A lot of pieces on the playground require more than one person," said Kristen DeBoy, an applied behavioral analysis therapist at the Shafer Center.
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HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2014
Inviting a friend to play on a tire swing can be difficult for autistic children, but with special kinds of playgrounds cropping up in Maryland and around the country, it may become easier. The Shafer Center, a school in Owings Mills for autistic children ages 2 to 8, recently installed a playground intended to help children with social interaction and motor skills. Specialized equipment can "foster social interaction" between autistic children, who sometimes have a more difficult time interacting socially and using social cues, experts say. "A lot of pieces on the playground require more than one person," said Kristen DeBoy, an applied behavioral analysis therapist at the Shafer Center.
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NEWS
December 28, 2008
Royal Keys will offer an innovative program to teach children of all ages important social skills at Slayton House in Columbia. The sessions will run Jan. 14 through March 4 at the following times: 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Mondays for 3- to 5-year-olds; and 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesdays for 6- to 11-year-olds. Free classes will be offered Jan. 7. The course will define etiquette, teach the "five magic words" and the "golden rule," explain phone etiquette and table manners, and unlock the key to being a good party host.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 24, 2013
On a busy Thursday night, the Ale House Columbia vibrates with energy. At the bar and in the dining area, tables are packed with friends and families chatting away. Servers hustle from table to table delivering drinks and appetizers. And just above eye level, all around, dozens of televisions flicker. The decision to include lots of TVs in the restaurant, which opened in late 2012, was customer-driven, says managing partner Greg Keating. "It's about giving people what they're looking for," he says.
NEWS
April 21, 2010
I travel around a LOT — too much, but one does learn things from spending time in the company of strangers, such as the fact that too many young American men suffer from a desperate lack of social skills. I'm not talking about dancing the tango and ordering wine and engaging in witty repartee, just the simple art of extending yourself in a friendly manner to someone you don't know, which is crucial in any job in which you brush up against the great unwashed public. (Or in politics, or spreading the gospel, or simply living a rich life in multivarious America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 24, 2013
On a busy Thursday night, the Ale House Columbia vibrates with energy. At the bar and in the dining area, tables are packed with friends and families chatting away. Servers hustle from table to table delivering drinks and appetizers. And just above eye level, all around, dozens of televisions flicker. The decision to include lots of TVs in the restaurant, which opened in late 2012, was customer-driven, says managing partner Greg Keating. "It's about giving people what they're looking for," he says.
NEWS
April 25, 2005
THE NATION'S elementary school principals are seeking to lead the early childhood education bandwagon. In a recent report, they call for universal, voluntary prekindergarten programs and challenge themselves to work with families, local organizations and policy-makers to create "early childhood learning communities." Their support stems partly from the growing recognition of principals as not only building managers but also instructional leaders. And it stems partly from self-interest -- if children are better prepared when they reach kindergarten, they are more likely to do better throughout school.
NEWS
November 20, 2008
Traditional marriage still social cornerstone It is with real sadness that I have viewed the pictures and heard the words of homosexuals in California protesting the failure of the same-sex marriage referendum ("Gay activists direct ire over marriage ban at Mormons," Nov. 7). Their signs accuse opponents of same-sex marriage of being "homophobic" and call for stopping the "hate." Certainly, there may be some same-sex marriage foes who hate or are homophobic. But that does not describe those I know in Maryland who would oppose such a referendum.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 1, 2005
Since the highly successful debut of Survivor five years ago, summertime has come to mean an onslaught of reality TV. Beauty and the Geek, a new WB series from producer Ashton Kutcher of Punk'd fame, is one of the first and more promising out of the gate this year. While it is hard to get excited about any new series from a genre so clearly in decline, as summertime network viewing goes, it could be worse. "This is not a dating show," a voice-of-God narrator says at the start of tonight's pilot.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Twice a week, dozens of girls can be seen scampering along the track at Harper's Choice Middle School, a workout that will ultimately lead to a 5K run. Before their often-challenging cardio exercise, they take part in brief sessions centered on building self-confidence and reinforcing social skills. The 10-week after-school program, called Girls on the Run, teaches the third- to eighth-graders self-esteem, a healthy lifestyle and social skills while they train for the Girls on the Run Fall 5K on Dec. 1 in Columbia.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Twice a week, dozens of girls can be seen scampering along the track at Harper's Choice Middle School, a workout that will ultimately lead to a 5K run. Before their often-challenging cardio exercise, they take part in brief sessions centered on building self-confidence and reinforcing social skills. The 10-week after-school program, called Girls on the Run, teaches the third- to eighth-graders self-esteem, a healthy lifestyle and social skills while they train for the Girls on the Run Fall 5K on Dec. 1 in Columbia.
EXPLORE
February 29, 2012
Play is all but absent in our children's over-programmed lives, as Marco della Cava notes in his story, "Calendar Is Blank on May 22. " Free time needs to come back into our kids' lives, and it needs to happen now. There is a nationwide scarcity of play, and we are beginning to see a stark difference between children who play and children who don't. Kids who play are healthier. Kids who play are less likely to be obese and develop obesity-related health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.
NEWS
December 3, 2011
In the 21 s t century, countries that prosper will have highly educated work forces that can compete in a global marketplace. Yet while the U.S. once led the world in the proportion of college graduates, in recent decades it has lost that advantage among the world's developed nations; today it ranks only 16 t h in its share of young adults with college degrees. President Barack Obama has set a national goal of boosting U.S. graduation rates to 55 percent by 2020. But to achieve that target, schools across the country will have to adopt ambitious programs to support and retain students - like the one under way at Baltimore's Coppin State University.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | September 23, 2011
Last month more than 104,000 students returned to Baltimore County Public Schools. While those students came back to the 26th largest school system in the nation, a new school tucked away in Lutherville welcomed just nine students. The Auburn School, on the ground floor of the Towson Unitarian Universalist Church, enrolls children between first and seventh grades who are "strong students" but need help with social skills, communication, language and organization. Head of School Marjorie Hoffman, who has spent 42 years in both private and public systems, believes the school is needed.
NEWS
April 21, 2010
I travel around a LOT — too much, but one does learn things from spending time in the company of strangers, such as the fact that too many young American men suffer from a desperate lack of social skills. I'm not talking about dancing the tango and ordering wine and engaging in witty repartee, just the simple art of extending yourself in a friendly manner to someone you don't know, which is crucial in any job in which you brush up against the great unwashed public. (Or in politics, or spreading the gospel, or simply living a rich life in multivarious America.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 5, 2009
Tyquelle Washington is a wiry 8-year-old with an infectious smile, boundless energy - but not a single friend. During board games, he interrupts his cousins and won't take turns. At school, he rarely listens to other children's interests, choosing instead to chatter about his own. Like many autistic children, Tyquelle doesn't seem to know how to interact with people or form relationships. But he's learning skills that often come naturally to others through an experimental therapy in an unconventional setting - during trips to the National Aquarium in Baltimore.
EXPLORE
February 29, 2012
Play is all but absent in our children's over-programmed lives, as Marco della Cava notes in his story, "Calendar Is Blank on May 22. " Free time needs to come back into our kids' lives, and it needs to happen now. There is a nationwide scarcity of play, and we are beginning to see a stark difference between children who play and children who don't. Kids who play are healthier. Kids who play are less likely to be obese and develop obesity-related health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
Until she attended a Head Start preschool program, 3-year-old Jazmine Moore used to pull her mother toward the kitchen to signal she wanted something to drink. "If I gave her milk instead of juice, she would fall out," or have a temper tantrum, recalled Tenesha Moore, a Govans resident. But after the little girl began spending her days in a program that helps children develop verbal and social skills, her mother said, Jazmine learned to speak in complete sentences -- and is likely to be ready for school by the time she turns 5. Stories like Jazmine's are the exception, however, mainly because of insufficient outreach to Baltimore families and lack of coordination among agencies that provide early-childhood services, according to a coalition of 50 community leaders and groups that has studied school readiness.
NEWS
December 28, 2008
Royal Keys will offer an innovative program to teach children of all ages important social skills at Slayton House in Columbia. The sessions will run Jan. 14 through March 4 at the following times: 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Mondays for 3- to 5-year-olds; and 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesdays for 6- to 11-year-olds. Free classes will be offered Jan. 7. The course will define etiquette, teach the "five magic words" and the "golden rule," explain phone etiquette and table manners, and unlock the key to being a good party host.
NEWS
November 20, 2008
Traditional marriage still social cornerstone It is with real sadness that I have viewed the pictures and heard the words of homosexuals in California protesting the failure of the same-sex marriage referendum ("Gay activists direct ire over marriage ban at Mormons," Nov. 7). Their signs accuse opponents of same-sex marriage of being "homophobic" and call for stopping the "hate." Certainly, there may be some same-sex marriage foes who hate or are homophobic. But that does not describe those I know in Maryland who would oppose such a referendum.
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