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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
A state employee who posted the Social Security numbers of nearly 3,000 Maryland residents online for weeks has been fired, according to the Maryland Department of Human Resources. "As of today, the employee is no longer employed with the state," said Nancy Lineman, DHR spokeswoman. She declined to comment further about the employee, stating that this was a personnel matter. "We are still not sure why he used the data in an unauthorized way," Lineman said. Lineman said that the DHR is still investigating this incident and that no decision has been made about the filing of criminal charges.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
More than 2,000 Social Security numbers of former Johns Hopkins University graduate students were exposed to potential hackers, the university confirmed Saturday. Hopkins officials discovered on March 19 that the names and Social Security numbers of 2,166 former students were stored on a server that was accessible to the Internet, said Dennis O'Shea, a university spokesman. "Somebody had stashed them on a machine, not realizing that when they did that, the files would be accessible on the Internet," O'Shea said.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Names and Social Security numbers of about 9,700 Marylanders with disabilities were exposed when a hacker breached a state contractor's computer systems in October, state health officials said Monday. The breach of Service Coordination Inc. involved a document that contained information on 70 percent of its clients, a company spokesperson said. The document also included clients' medical assistance numbers, Medicaid status, demographics and other information related to their case management.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Names and Social Security numbers of about 9,700 Marylanders with disabilities were exposed when a hacker breached a state contractor's computer systems in October, state health officials said Monday. The breach of Service Coordination Inc. involved a document that contained information on 70 percent of its clients, a company spokesperson said. The document also included clients' medical assistance numbers, Medicaid status, demographics and other information related to their case management.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
A computer thumb drive that was lost in the mail with the names, Social Security numbers and salaries of some Under Armour employees was being sent between two offices of PricewaterhouseCoopers, an auditing firm used by the Baltimore-based sports apparel company, an Under Armour official said Monday. "The thumb drive was not mailed from Under Armour to PwC. It was mailed between PwC offices," Under Armour spokeswoman Diane Pelkey said in an email. The breach of payroll data was first reported by Ohio's Dayton Daily News, which last week obtained an internal memo sent by Under Armour to its employees about the incident.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | May 1, 2012
You can be dead and still be a victim in this world. A new report by ID Analytics find that thieves target the dead, using their Social Security numbers to get credit cards, cellphones and other services. The company says it compared the names, Social Security numbers and birth date on 100 million credit applications in the first quarter of last year with Social Security's Death Master File to find out if applicants were using the information of the dead. The findings: -     132,000 applications had some deliberate manipulations of Social Security numbers -     66,000 were straight up-and-up ID theft of the dead -   the person had died months before the application was made.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 12, 2012
If you throw away documents with personal information on them, those papers could be stolen and eventually, so can your identity. That's why identity theft experts suggest that consumers shred papers with sensitive information, such as bank account numbers or Social Security numbers. But not everyone has a shredder. For those without one, the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Maryland and Delaware is holding a free “shred-it” event from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20th, at Towson University's No. 11 parking lot. That's above the University Union Parking Garage off Osler Drive.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
People who are wary of identity theft and protective of their personal information will find the actions of a state worker at the Maryland Department of Human Resources unsettling. The Social Security numbers of almost 3,000 Maryland residents who filed for assistance at the DHR were posted on the Internet for several months before it was discovered ("DHR fires worker who posted Social Security numbers on the Internet," July 23). Government agencies need to impose stricter policies and tougher regulations against employees violating the confidentiality of the people.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
More than 2,000 Social Security numbers of former Johns Hopkins University graduate students were exposed to potential hackers, the university confirmed Saturday. Hopkins officials discovered on March 19 that the names and Social Security numbers of 2,166 former students were stored on a server that was accessible to the Internet, said Dennis O'Shea, a university spokesman. "Somebody had stashed them on a machine, not realizing that when they did that, the files would be accessible on the Internet," O'Shea said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | December 6, 2012
Baltimore city school officials acknowledged this week that lax employee verification protocols may have contributed to a temporary employee -- who was recently arrested on charges he impregnated a 15-year-old girl in Harford County -- taking on a number of leadership roles at Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School. In the story today, officials said that Shawn Nowlin was hired as a temporary professional to do outreach work, but posed as, among other things, a child and family therapist for the school system.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
Hackers who stole confidential information on more than 309,000 current and former students and faculty from computers at the University of Maryland College Park last week had to penetrate multiple layers of security to get at the data, and school officials still don't know exactly how they did it or who they were. The sophisticated attack, which compromised Social Security numbers, birth dates, university ID numbers and other personal information, was a stark reminder of how vulnerable the nation's institutions are. School officials moved quickly to respond to the breach, which apparently took place sometime between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. Tuesday and was discovered by staffers a few hours later.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | May 24, 2013
Police in Howard County are warning elderly residents to watch out for financial scams. The warning comes after an 86-year-old Elkridge man wired $151,000 to cover what he believed were taxes on a fake $1.6 million prize check, police said. Police are investigating the theft and fraud case. The victim has received letters and phone calls over the last month from people claiming to be from Publisher's Clearing House, company attorneys or IRS representatives, police said. The man was sent a fake prize check and told he would be able to cash the check once he paid the taxes and received an activation code.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | February 7, 2013
The IRS wants to show taxpayers it is taking identity theft seriously. Today, the agency announced it conducted a 32-state sweep in recent weeks that targeted 389 identity theft suspects and led to 734 enforcement actions - from complaints to indictments and arrests - in January. It had help from the Department of Justice and U.S. Attorneys' offices. The IRS posted a map of its crackdown, which includes several cases in Maryland. According to the IRS, this includes an indictment in January of two brothers who allegedly filed fake returns from April 2007 to January 2012, collecting refunds ranging from about $1,500 to $4,950.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | December 6, 2012
Baltimore city school officials acknowledged this week that lax employee verification protocols may have contributed to a temporary employee -- who was recently arrested on charges he impregnated a 15-year-old girl in Harford County -- taking on a number of leadership roles at Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School. In the story today, officials said that Shawn Nowlin was hired as a temporary professional to do outreach work, but posed as, among other things, a child and family therapist for the school system.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 12, 2012
If you throw away documents with personal information on them, those papers could be stolen and eventually, so can your identity. That's why identity theft experts suggest that consumers shred papers with sensitive information, such as bank account numbers or Social Security numbers. But not everyone has a shredder. For those without one, the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Maryland and Delaware is holding a free “shred-it” event from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20th, at Towson University's No. 11 parking lot. That's above the University Union Parking Garage off Osler Drive.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
There was a time when city residents only had to do jury duty every 18 months if they reported for duty and weren't selected for a trial. If they served on a jury they weren't called for another three years. Now residents are called for duty every year. My co-worker received a summons for late summer after having served last fall. When she called the courthouse she was informed there was a "new system" that did not include the dates of residents' previous service, so that many people were being called back within a year.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | February 7, 2013
The IRS wants to show taxpayers it is taking identity theft seriously. Today, the agency announced it conducted a 32-state sweep in recent weeks that targeted 389 identity theft suspects and led to 734 enforcement actions - from complaints to indictments and arrests - in January. It had help from the Department of Justice and U.S. Attorneys' offices. The IRS posted a map of its crackdown, which includes several cases in Maryland. According to the IRS, this includes an indictment in January of two brothers who allegedly filed fake returns from April 2007 to January 2012, collecting refunds ranging from about $1,500 to $4,950.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Baltimore police are urging residents to be wary of a series of confidence schemes that have bilked several people out of thousands of dollars and are leading some to be duped into participating in illegal enterprises. Detectives Robert Elkner and Sarah Connelly of the fraud unit described several variations of the scheme and urged people to not divulge personal information such as bank account and Social Security numbers and dates of birth on the Internet. One scheme is called "remailing," in which unsuspecting victims become "middlemen" in a shipping enterprise.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | May 1, 2012
You can be dead and still be a victim in this world. A new report by ID Analytics find that thieves target the dead, using their Social Security numbers to get credit cards, cellphones and other services. The company says it compared the names, Social Security numbers and birth date on 100 million credit applications in the first quarter of last year with Social Security's Death Master File to find out if applicants were using the information of the dead. The findings: -     132,000 applications had some deliberate manipulations of Social Security numbers -     66,000 were straight up-and-up ID theft of the dead -   the person had died months before the application was made.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
A computer thumb drive that was lost in the mail with the names, Social Security numbers and salaries of some Under Armour employees was being sent between two offices of PricewaterhouseCoopers, an auditing firm used by the Baltimore-based sports apparel company, an Under Armour official said Monday. "The thumb drive was not mailed from Under Armour to PwC. It was mailed between PwC offices," Under Armour spokeswoman Diane Pelkey said in an email. The breach of payroll data was first reported by Ohio's Dayton Daily News, which last week obtained an internal memo sent by Under Armour to its employees about the incident.
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