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NEWS
November 11, 2010
President Obama's bipartisan deficit reduction commission is calling for cuts in Social Security benefits. ("Deficit plan spreads the pain,", Nov 11). This recommendation will appeal to many conservatives. Why is it that conservatives who cry bloody murder at any mention of increased taxes are happy about reduced Social Security benefits? Reducing benefits takes money out of people's pockets just like raising taxes. The effect of reduced benefits is exactly like a new income tax, except that it only applies to retired people.
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NEWS
March 4, 2014
Maryland's practice of shoring up its foster care budget by appropriating the Social Security survivor benefits of the children in its care is questionable and merits close scrutiny by legislators. Maryland is hardly alone in taking this step, and prohibiting it would present financial and logistical hurdles. But there is a strong case to be made that it is unfair to the children the state is supposed to be caring for. The state has an obligation to care for children who are abused or neglected, and the children are not expected to pay the state back.
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NEWS
January 30, 2014
Representative C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's decision not to run for governor might not have been much of a surprise for Maryland's politicians, but his older constituents, who comprise about 12 percent of his district's voters, may well have been surprised to hear that he wants to remain in Washington to continue working on tax and entitlement reform ( "Ruppersberger decides against a run for governor," Jan. 22). On Capitol Hill, "entitlement reform" is the "kinder, gentler" phrase that members of both political parties now use to describe plans to cut benefits for middle-class Americans.
NEWS
February 11, 2014
Commentator Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. suggests raising the qualifying age for Social Security to 70 because "we are living much longer than originally envisioned; our benefits should reflect this fact of life" ( "Nine ideas to revive the Republican Party," Feb. 9). First of all, there is ample evidence that in 1935, when Social Security launched, the actuaries of the Roosevelt administration knew full well that life expectancy at age 65 would gradually extend. So Mr. Ehrlich is simply wrong on his history.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2005
Q. I am 55 years old and thinking about retiring in a year or two. Would my early retirement affect how much I receive from Social Security after I elect to take regular benefits at age 65? - B.S.K., Chicago A. Based on the way Social Security benefits are calculated and paid, you and many others should carefully reconsider your decision to retire early. Here's why. The monthly benefits you receive from Social Security depend on your average earnings over the best 35 years in your work history.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
More than one-third of Baltimore's homeless may be eligible for Social Security benefits, but only 4 percent are receiving aid, in part because of an impersonal review system that frustrates the most dogged applicants.The chain of paperwork takes a minimum of three months if an applicant is approved on the first try. Sixty percent of all applicants have to appeal initial rulings against them, drawing the wait out to more than six months.Factor in the special problems of the homeless, about one-third of whom are mentally ill, and the difficulty in matching people to services becomes even greater, homeless advocates and Social Security workers agree.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY and SUSAN BONDY,Creators Syndicate | August 14, 1994
Q: Recently, I mailed in the new Social Security form SSA-7004, and I just received the summary of my retirement benefits. The following statement puzzled me: "Your monthly benefit at 62 in today's dollars will be about $330."I'm 48 years old. Let's assume that when I turn 62, a dollar will be worth about half of what it is today In 2005, will my check be $165, $330 or $660?A: Social Security benefits are adjusted for inflation, so the face amount of the check would grow as long as we have a positive inflation.
NEWS
By Arizona Republic | September 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- To Verna Adcock, it is the final indignity.As she mourned the death of her 22-year-old daughter last year, Ms. Adcock, of Tempe, Ariz., learned that the killer, Curtis Donald McDonnell, was receiving monthly Social Security disability -- even though Congress outlawed Social Security benefits for felons in 1980.Even more troubling to Ms. Adcock was the discovery that McDonnell, who witnesses said shouted racial epithets at the young black woman after he pulled the trigger, remains eligible for benefits even today, while he is confined at the Arizona State Hospital after being found incompetent to stand trial.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 5, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Vice President Al Gore proposed yesterday the most substantial increase in Social Security benefits in 25 years, suggesting that widows and working mothers be granted more money to combat high poverty levels among elderly single women. The $100 billion proposal, outlined at a Philadelphia community center, drew praise from senior citizens and women's groups. But it drew fire from liberal and conservative experts on Social Security, who questioned the wisdom of increasing benefits when the system's long-term solvency is in doubt.
NEWS
March 21, 2000
IT NO longer makes sense to penalize senior citizens for continuing to work beyond the time they can collect full Social Security benefits. Our thriving economy is short on manpower and needs their enormous pool of expertise and strong work ethic. Under Social Security laws, anyone age 65 to 69 who continues to work and earns over $17,000 this year will lose $1 of Social Security benefits for each $3 earned above that limit. This punitive provision was enacted in the Depression, when America had far more workers than jobs and sought to encourage seniors to retire.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
Representative C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger's decision not to run for governor might not have been much of a surprise for Maryland's politicians, but his older constituents, who comprise about 12 percent of his district's voters, may well have been surprised to hear that he wants to remain in Washington to continue working on tax and entitlement reform ( "Ruppersberger decides against a run for governor," Jan. 22). On Capitol Hill, "entitlement reform" is the "kinder, gentler" phrase that members of both political parties now use to describe plans to cut benefits for middle-class Americans.
NEWS
January 2, 2013
I must disagree with letter writer Neil L. Bergsman's view that high taxes don't drive people out of Maryland ("Tax rates have a negligible effect on people's decision to move out of state," Dec. 29). My wife and I retired from the federal government, and it puzzles us why Maryland is taxing our retirement income when states like Texas and Florida do not tax retirement income or Social Security benefits. Maryland is not a tax-friendly state for retirees, even though Social Security benefits are not taxed here.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Jim Nicholas lay in a hospital bed recovering after a heart procedure when his attorney called with life-changing news: The Social Security Administration would pay him more than $206,000 in disability benefits, bringing an end to his nine-year court battle. Ever since he began suffering from heart failure, Nicholas and his wife, Yvonne, had been trying to prove he was sick enough to get benefits from the agency, which not only administers Social Security but provides support for those too disabled to work.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
The CEO of Chick-fil-A did more than express a view denigrating gay relationships ("Fast food activism," Aug. 1). The company spends millions to attack the very lives and security of people in same-sex relationships. As a result of anti-gay legislation like the Defense of Marriage Act, insurance companies do not offer private annuity contracts to same-sex couples who want to provide for their retirement. Social Security benefits do not extend to survivor relationships in same-sex unions.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 27, 2011
Last week, Social Security beneficiaries learned their benefits would go up 3.6 percent next year. That's about $43 a month for the typical check of $1,186, according to the National Committee to Preserve Social Security & Medicare. But the concern was that increases in Medicare Part B premiums would eat up that raise in benefits. The Department of Health and Human Services announced today that the premium would only go up by $3.50. That means, according to the national committee, seniors over the age of 65 who paid $96.40 a month for Medicare Part B will pay $99.90 next year.
NEWS
October 24, 2011
As readers of The Sun for over 40 years, we have never read a letter to the editor composed with such animosity than the recent letter from William Smith ("Gas tax brings out whiners," Oct. 19). Being high net worth individuals, we can easily afford another $3 to fill our gas tanks if, in his complete stupidity, Gov. Martin O'Malley gets away with adding 15 cents to the existing 23.5 cents per gallon we pay. After all, it's only a mere 63.8 percent increase. If we remember correctly, Mr. O'Malley ran on a no tax increase platform.
NEWS
By Richard Rainey and Richard Rainey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - More than 47 million elderly and disabled people will receive a 2.7 percent cost-of-living increase - an average of about $25 a month - in their Social Security benefits starting in January, the government announced yesterday. But for many of those who participate in Part B of Medicare, which covers visits to doctors' offices, almost half of the benefit increase will disappear before they ever see it. The government announced last week that the Medicare premium, which typically is deducted from Social Security checks, would rise by $11.60 a month next year.
NEWS
January 2, 2013
I must disagree with letter writer Neil L. Bergsman's view that high taxes don't drive people out of Maryland ("Tax rates have a negligible effect on people's decision to move out of state," Dec. 29). My wife and I retired from the federal government, and it puzzles us why Maryland is taxing our retirement income when states like Texas and Florida do not tax retirement income or Social Security benefits. Maryland is not a tax-friendly state for retirees, even though Social Security benefits are not taxed here.
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
The Association of Community Services has announced the recipients of the 2011 Audrey Robbins Humanitarian Awards, who will be honored in a ceremony later this month. The annual awards recognize individuals and groups who have "performed services above and beyond the call of duty" in the Howard County community, according to the organization. This year's winners are: • Volunteer of the Year: Don Bard, who helps provide access to computers to local students and their families who could not otherwise afford them through his Lazarus Foundation.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Greetings, Class of 2011. You have worked hard in college these past four years — five or six years for some of you — and are about to enter the real world. That world, as "The Daily Show" host Jon Stewart told College of William & Mary graduates in 2004, is a little different than life on campus. "The biggest difference," Stewart told them, "is you will now be paying for things. " Indeed, finances will play a big role in your life from now on. Two-thirds of you leaving school with a bachelor's degree will be shouldering student loans.
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