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By FRANK D. ROYLANCE | March 26, 1995
In 1776, the Declaration of Independence enshrined forever our inalienable right to pursue happiness.The tricky part, it turns out, is figuring out which way to run in order to catch it.To find out, social scientists in the past 10 years have turned "happiness" research into a minor growth industry, with nearly 800 separate investigations into the dark mysteries of happiness.They have discovered that much of what we thought we knew about the sources of happiness and unhappiness in our lives is wrong.
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NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | January 28, 2007
Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public Sarah E. Igo Harvard University Press / 398 pages / $35 Boccaccio, the medieval collector of sexual exploits, told much better stories than Alfred Kinsey, claimed a columnist for the Tampa Times. But in 1949, he complained, "unless you have statistics and graphs," no one will pay attention. Aggregate data have always had a special resonance, relevance and authority in democracies where, at least in theory, the majority rules.
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NEWS
By New York News Service | April 22, 1992
The aloof swagger and studied unflappability projected by young black men from inner-city urban areas is a "cool pose," a bit of posturing that insulates them from an otherwise overwhelming social reality, a new report holds.While the cool pose is often misread by teachers, principals and police officers as an attitude of defiance, psychologists who have studied it say it is a way for black youths to maintain a sense of integrity and suppress rage at being blocked from usual routes to esteem and success.
NEWS
By Charles Duhigg and Charles Duhigg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 13, 2005
When millions of Americans abandoned smoking in the 1980s, many health experts and social scientists thought they had tobacco on the run. But in the '90s progress began to slow: From 1990 to 2003, according to federal figures, only 3 percent of Americans gave up their cigarettes. The slowdown prompted many experts to conclude that most of the smokers who could easily quit already had done so. What remained was a hard-core group of Americans who continued to puff away despite significant health risks and severe social stigma.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | May 23, 1999
"The Great Disruption: Human Nature and the Reconstitution of Social Order," by Francis Fukuyama. Free Press. 343 pages. $26.Out in the deep waters of contemporary times swims a group of social scientists waiting to catch the next big wave of social change to surf into shore. Francis Fukuyama, author of the best-selling "The End of History and the Last Man," thinks he has found one in what he identifies as a moral decline of Western and developed Far Eastern countries from the 1960s to the beginning of this decade, to be followed by a moral "reconstitution."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- Waging war has always been a harrowing business. But some social scientists studying the Army say that keeping the peace can be nearly as stressful as combat for American soldiers -- and also for their spouses and children.U.S. peacekeepers are dispatched on short notice with little instruction about local languages and culture.Trained for combat, the soldiers serve as heavily armed police. Motivated by patriotism, they can risk their lives in regional squabbles where U.S. interests aren't clearly at stake.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1995
NEW YORK -- An index devised by a group of social scientists at Fordham University reports that six social ills, including child abuse and the gap between rich and poor, are at their worst recorded levels and have dragged the nation's well-being to its fourth lowest point in 24 years.The scientists also tracked their social well-being index against the Gross Domestic Product, the output of all goods and services, and concluded that the nation's economic prosperity and its social health, as measured by the index, are no longer linked.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 12, 2002
BOSTON- I came by my skepticism early and honorably. As a college freshman, I helped my roommate devise a mischievous experiment for her statistics class. We turned the dorm lavatory into a laboratory. Standing before a trio of bathroom stalls, she charted our dormmates' choices - left, right, or center - with their political ideologies. The two, I blush to tell you, correlated perfectly. That may be why I became a journalist - or at least a dubious student of studies. In any case, I was ahead of the crowd.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | January 28, 2007
Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public Sarah E. Igo Harvard University Press / 398 pages / $35 Boccaccio, the medieval collector of sexual exploits, told much better stories than Alfred Kinsey, claimed a columnist for the Tampa Times. But in 1949, he complained, "unless you have statistics and graphs," no one will pay attention. Aggregate data have always had a special resonance, relevance and authority in democracies where, at least in theory, the majority rules.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | October 2, 1993
On July 16, 1945, moments after the first nuclear device detonated at the Trinity test site in Nevada, Robert Oppenheimer, the physicist who had led the team that produced the atomic bomb, turned to a colleague and said, ''Now science has known evil.''Oppenheimer's remark has gone down in history with Samuel F.B. Morse's ''What hath God wrought?'' and Alexander Graham Bell's ''Come here, Mr. Watson, I want to see you.'' And yet in a curious way, of the three men Oppenheimer probably knew least of which he spoke.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 12, 2002
BOSTON- I came by my skepticism early and honorably. As a college freshman, I helped my roommate devise a mischievous experiment for her statistics class. We turned the dorm lavatory into a laboratory. Standing before a trio of bathroom stalls, she charted our dormmates' choices - left, right, or center - with their political ideologies. The two, I blush to tell you, correlated perfectly. That may be why I became a journalist - or at least a dubious student of studies. In any case, I was ahead of the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | May 23, 1999
"The Great Disruption: Human Nature and the Reconstitution of Social Order," by Francis Fukuyama. Free Press. 343 pages. $26.Out in the deep waters of contemporary times swims a group of social scientists waiting to catch the next big wave of social change to surf into shore. Francis Fukuyama, author of the best-selling "The End of History and the Last Man," thinks he has found one in what he identifies as a moral decline of Western and developed Far Eastern countries from the 1960s to the beginning of this decade, to be followed by a moral "reconstitution."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
Parents in Baltimore and across the nation are profoundly worried about their adolescent daughters, fearful that life today has become so fraught with danger for young girls that families are hard-pressed to protect them.Once, families could count on love and common sense to carry them from childhood through the turmoil of adolescence, leaving parent and child relatively unscathed on the approach to adulthood.Today, that peace of mind has been lost.Ever-growing evidence makes the case that life has become more treacherous for adolescents, particularly for girls age 10 to 14, who spend less time with adults than they did just 20 years ago. An October report by the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development documented an alarming rise in the suicide rate for girls that age. Therapists report an epidemic of eating disorders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1995
NEW YORK -- An index devised by a group of social scientists at Fordham University reports that six social ills, including child abuse and the gap between rich and poor, are at their worst recorded levels and have dragged the nation's well-being to its fourth lowest point in 24 years.The scientists also tracked their social well-being index against the Gross Domestic Product, the output of all goods and services, and concluded that the nation's economic prosperity and its social health, as measured by the index, are no longer linked.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 18, 1995
Today dads all over Maryland will be opening gifts of socks, books, tools and, if we are lucky, a package or two containing something bad for us.It is Father's Day. If you have forgotten, don't panic. There is still time to run around the corner and get Dad a card, a hunk of meat, or a bottle of his favorite liquid, which probably isn't sparkling water.Virtually any gift is OK for Dad, as long as it is not pink or aimed at "reforming" him. On Father's Day, dads don't want to think about self-improvement.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- Waging war has always been a harrowing business. But some social scientists studying the Army say that keeping the peace can be nearly as stressful as combat for American soldiers -- and also for their spouses and children.U.S. peacekeepers are dispatched on short notice with little instruction about local languages and culture.Trained for combat, the soldiers serve as heavily armed police. Motivated by patriotism, they can risk their lives in regional squabbles where U.S. interests aren't clearly at stake.
NEWS
By E. D. Hirsch Jr | November 1, 1994
Charlottesville, Va. -- THE BELL Curve," by Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein, has set off a heated debate over race and the genetic component of intelligence.While the authors do a responsible job of analyzing a vast amount of complex data, the limitations of the studies involved have been largely overlooked by social scientists and the public.Equally worrisome, the book's tone of social inevitabilty diverts public attention from the remediable failures of our schools.In essence, the authors argue that schools can do little to overcome the effects of hereditary determination and home environment on intelligence.
NEWS
By Charles Duhigg and Charles Duhigg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 13, 2005
When millions of Americans abandoned smoking in the 1980s, many health experts and social scientists thought they had tobacco on the run. But in the '90s progress began to slow: From 1990 to 2003, according to federal figures, only 3 percent of Americans gave up their cigarettes. The slowdown prompted many experts to conclude that most of the smokers who could easily quit already had done so. What remained was a hard-core group of Americans who continued to puff away despite significant health risks and severe social stigma.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE | March 26, 1995
In 1776, the Declaration of Independence enshrined forever our inalienable right to pursue happiness.The tricky part, it turns out, is figuring out which way to run in order to catch it.To find out, social scientists in the past 10 years have turned "happiness" research into a minor growth industry, with nearly 800 separate investigations into the dark mysteries of happiness.They have discovered that much of what we thought we knew about the sources of happiness and unhappiness in our lives is wrong.
NEWS
By E. D. Hirsch Jr | November 1, 1994
Charlottesville, Va. -- THE BELL Curve," by Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein, has set off a heated debate over race and the genetic component of intelligence.While the authors do a responsible job of analyzing a vast amount of complex data, the limitations of the studies involved have been largely overlooked by social scientists and the public.Equally worrisome, the book's tone of social inevitabilty diverts public attention from the remediable failures of our schools.In essence, the authors argue that schools can do little to overcome the effects of hereditary determination and home environment on intelligence.
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