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By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2000
Shirlene Etheredge Bembry, a social science project director and children's advocate, died Aug. 18 of breast cancer at Howard County General Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 48. Mrs. Bembry, known as Shirley, held a law degree but spent much of her professional life at the University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Social Work, where she was involved in welfare reform, guardianship and child support issues. Most recently, she was a grant manager for a large, federally funded study of guardianship and child welfare at UMB, colleagues said.
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NEWS
By Sandra Hofferth | July 15, 2013
Here's another reason the dysfunctional federal budget process is bad for Americans: besides hurting the economy and hitting us in the pocketbook, partisan feuding over budget cuts could undermine our health and even shorten our lives. That's because House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and others in Congress have been using the budget process to target research in the behavioral and social sciences for elimination, even though they're indispensable to understanding and improving Americans' health.
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NEWS
September 16, 1990
WESTMINSTER - James P. Bruns has joined the staff of Carroll Community College as the new director of instruction.He comes to CCC from the social science division of Dundalk Community College, where, as chairman, he was responsible for implementing all credit and non-credit courses for the department, as well as developing career programs in labor studies, early childhood education, special education and chemical dependency counseling.He also developed a contract with the State Human Resources Division to train public assistance workers and instituted Dundalk's first coordinated effort in working with business and industry.
NEWS
By Susan Brink and Susan Brink,Los Angeles Times | December 19, 2007
It was Christmas Eve when George Bailey stared into the black depths of the river beneath the bridge in Bedford Falls, convinced that the world would be better off without him. That scene from the 1946 movie classic It's a Wonderful Life could well have given birth to the media myth that Christmas is a trigger for increased suicides and episodes of depression. It is a baseless notion, according to a body of published studies by statisticians who have examined hundreds of thousands of suicides in the United States and around the world.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 2007
Each day about 1,700 juniors at an East Coast college log on to Facebook.com to accumulate "friends," compare movie preferences, share videos and exchange cybercocktails and kisses. Unwittingly, these students have become the subjects of academic research. To study how personal tastes, habits and values affect the formation of social relationships (and how social relationships affect tastes, habits and values), a team of researchers from Harvard and the University of California at Los Angeles is monitoring the Facebook profiles of an entire class of students at one college, which they declined to name for privacy reasons.
NEWS
May 23, 1994
2nd marketing award is captured by HCCA Howard Community College program has won a second national award this year for excellence in marketing of academic programs.HCC's James W. Rouse Scholars Program received a 1994 Circle of Excellence Award in the Special Student Recruitment Projects division from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.HCC staff cited in the award were Barbara Greenfield, director of admissions and testing services, and Randy Bengfort, director of marketing and public relations.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
Hampton Thompson "Red" Davey Jr., a history and social science professor at St. Mary's College of Maryland, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his home in California, Md. He was 61. Dr. Davey had been on a leave of absence for about a year because of illness. In the early 1990s, Dr. Davey, a popular professor with an encyclopedic memory, helped transform St. Mary's from a "party school" to a college known for its academics, said Marc Apter, spokesman for the college. "Red was critical during the college's rise from a regular college known for being scholarly and fun to one that was notably scholarly," said Jane Margaret O'Brien, president of St. Mary's since 1996.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 17, 2000
WASHINGTON -- When this Congress ends, so will one of the broadest and deepest public careers in American history. Daniel Patrick Moynihan -- participant in John Kennedy's New Frontier, member of Lyndon Johnson's White House staff, Richard Nixon's domestic policy adviser, Gerald Ford's ambassador to India and the United Nations, four-term senator -- will walk from the Senate and political life, leaving both better for his having been in them, and leaving...
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2005
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced yesterday that it will underwrite a new center at the University of Maryland to conduct social and behavioral research into terrorists and terrorist organizations, hoping to break new ground by employing many of the same academic tools used to battle drug gangs and violent crime. One of the center's first tasks will be a study of how terrorist organizations form and recruit, with a focus on specific organizations, such as al-Qaida, that pose a danger to the United States.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | October 24, 2006
A Federal Communications Commission plan to ease restrictions on consolidation of media companies would lead to less local news and fewer choices for radio and television audiences, according to studies released yesterday. The Benton Foundation and the Social Science Research Council, authors of the studies, concluded that media consolidation does not create better, more local or more diverse media content, as the FCC maintains. For instance, the studies said, a radio company that owns multiple stations in a local market is less likely to offer niche formats such as easy listening, bluegrass, tejano and classical music.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 17, 2007
Each day about 1,700 juniors at an East Coast college log on to Facebook.com to accumulate "friends," compare movie preferences, share videos and exchange cybercocktails and kisses. Unwittingly, these students have become the subjects of academic research. To study how personal tastes, habits and values affect the formation of social relationships (and how social relationships affect tastes, habits and values), a team of researchers from Harvard and the University of California at Los Angeles is monitoring the Facebook profiles of an entire class of students at one college, which they declined to name for privacy reasons.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | October 24, 2006
A Federal Communications Commission plan to ease restrictions on consolidation of media companies would lead to less local news and fewer choices for radio and television audiences, according to studies released yesterday. The Benton Foundation and the Social Science Research Council, authors of the studies, concluded that media consolidation does not create better, more local or more diverse media content, as the FCC maintains. For instance, the studies said, a radio company that owns multiple stations in a local market is less likely to offer niche formats such as easy listening, bluegrass, tejano and classical music.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Diet Omega-3 fatty acids' benefits questioned Eat your fatty fish and hang on, if you wish, to that bottle of tasty fish oil. But don't expect them to protect you from cancer. A new study says that foods and supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids do not offer such protection, dashing some earlier hints that they might. The analysis, which looked at 38 studies conducted between 1966 and 2005, suggests that omega-3s (found in many kinds of fish and some plants) have no significant effect on a variety of cancers, including those of the breast, colon, lung and prostate.
NEWS
October 18, 2005
Elizabeth B. Warbasse, a retired social sciences professor, died of cancer Wednesday at Coastal Hospice in Salisbury. The former Roland Park resident was 77. Born Elizabeth Bowles in Summit, N.J., she earned a degree at Wellesley College and a master's degree in economic education from the Johns Hopkins University. She held a doctorate in American history from Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Mass. After teaching at Howard University in Washington and Wagner College on Staten Island, N.Y., she moved to Baltimore in 1966 with her husband, Dr. Richard Warbasse, who is now retired.
NEWS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN AND PAUL ADAMS and LAURA SMITHERMAN AND PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTERS | October 11, 2005
The most widely used exercise in game theory, the field that drew the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences this year, has nothing to do with economics. It's called the "prisoner's dilemma" and examines the choices of two criminals to stay mum or confess and implicate their cohort. The dilemma is a favorite teaching tool of Thomas C. Schelling, a professor at the University of Maryland who won the Nobel yesterday. The prize committee bestowed the honor on Schelling and Israeli-American Robert J. Aumann for their research on game theory.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | January 23, 2005
U.S. DISTRICT Judge Marvin J. Garbis wants a redistribution of Baltimore's poor. He's ordered a regional solution to what he concludes was a government-driven concentration of poverty and racial minorities in the city. He may have invited a collision of political and judicial forces. Mayor Martin O'Malley immediately threw down a velvet glove dissent. Baltimore wants to keep its people, the mayor said. It wants to make life good, productive and safe for Baltimoreans in Baltimore. Mr. O'Malley doesn't want to be in the population exporting business.
NEWS
October 21, 2000
Carol F. Jopling, 83, researcher, librarian Carol F. Jopling, a retired researcher, teacher, anthropologist and librarian, died Oct. 14 of a massive stroke at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. She was 83. The former Roland Park and Chestertown resident had been chief librarian for three years at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Balboa, Panama, at the time of her retirement in 1984. A resident of Chevy Chase since last year, Mrs. Jopling was a social science reference librarian at the University of Maryland, College Park from 1960 to 1961, and later worked at the Library of Congress.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Diet Omega-3 fatty acids' benefits questioned Eat your fatty fish and hang on, if you wish, to that bottle of tasty fish oil. But don't expect them to protect you from cancer. A new study says that foods and supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids do not offer such protection, dashing some earlier hints that they might. The analysis, which looked at 38 studies conducted between 1966 and 2005, suggests that omega-3s (found in many kinds of fish and some plants) have no significant effect on a variety of cancers, including those of the breast, colon, lung and prostate.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2005
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced yesterday that it will underwrite a new center at the University of Maryland to conduct social and behavioral research into terrorists and terrorist organizations, hoping to break new ground by employing many of the same academic tools used to battle drug gangs and violent crime. One of the center's first tasks will be a study of how terrorist organizations form and recruit, with a focus on specific organizations, such as al-Qaida, that pose a danger to the United States.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 20, 2004
THIS IS FOR young guys who are newly married and facing their first Father's Day with an official father-in-law, middle-aged guys who've been married for a while, and old guys who've survived their parents and in-laws and even remember their names. Divorced guys can play along, too. Which of the following best describes you? 1. My father was (is) the greatest guy who ever lived, followed immediately by my father-in-law, the second-greatest guy who ever lived. 2. My relationship with my father was terrible, but when I married I married well and got the greatest father-in-law a fellow could imagine.
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