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BUSINESS
By Newsday | January 9, 1991
NEW YORK -- The Council on Economic Priorities yesterday named its top-rated and "X-rated" makers of household products, based on its own own controversial yardstick for social responsibility.In its 1991 ranking of 180 manufacturers, the New York-based research and advocacy group listed Colgate-Palmolive, General Mills, Kellogg and S.C. Johnson & Sons as top-rated.The dubious distinction of being "X-rated" went to Abbott Labs, American Cyanamid, Castle & Cooke, Fantastic Foods, Nestle, Tillamook Cheese, and USX.The council has attempted to influence investors since it was founded in 1969, but only in recent years has it armed shoppers with information about a company's record on such issues as the environment and the advancement of women.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 27, 2014
It's high time for all to get involved with recycling agendas. I live in a condominium in northeast Baltimore County where, on every street, there are dumpsters, clearly denoted for either garbage or recycling. They are strategically placed throughout the complex. And yet when I open the lid of the garbage dumpster, I see many recyclable items. Should I have to be the one who has to differentiate between garbage and recyclables and sort out those items for my neighbors? Are there still people truly that lazy, that indifferent, to the concept?
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NEWS
October 7, 2010
Here is my opinion as a future voter: Everywhere I look there is campaign propaganda — commercials on TV, signs on lawns and roadways, and fliers stuffed in our mailbox. Just the other night I saw back-to-back commercials on a candidate that totally contradicted each other. I have a solution. The candidates should take all the money they are spending in meaningless advertisements and give it to the Bea Gaddy center so it can really help someone. (I read the article in the October 4th Sun about the center being severely low on funds and having to turn off its phone.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
Stuart Butler's op-ed ("An enterprising approach to health," Feb. 29) on what our proposed Health Enterprise Zones (HEZs) can learn from urban "economic" enterprise zones is a valuable critique. His focus on incentives, innovation and community partnerships echoes the strengths of our legislation, the Maryland Health Improvement and Disparities Reduction Act. Like economic enterprise zones, we intend to blanket a distressed community with incentives that draw in the expert people and quality services needed to address a specific problem: health disparities among underserved communities.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune bNB | September 5, 1991
Advertising by some apparel manufacturers continues its innovative and interesting course -- maybe even more interesting than the season's clothes.Esprit will most likely get lots of reaction to its new ad campaign themed to the question: "If you could change the world, what would you do?"The answers -- provided by honest-to-goodness real people, not copywriters -- include:*"I'd teach everybody that nobody is a nobody."*"I'd keep a women's right to choose unless George Bush is free to baby-sit."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2002
Now that NBC has agreed to accept commercials for hard liquor, many in the Baltimore advertising community say other networks will follow suit and that such advertising is here to stay. Yet, viewers may scarcely notice the new advertising, based on the findings of a recent poll commissioned by Eisner Communications. The majority of Americans, 56 percent, said they thought they had recently seen a commercial for hard liquor on TV - but such ads have been absent from broadcast television since a self-imposed ban in 1948, said David L. Blum, senior vice president of Eisner Communications.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
It's high time for all to get involved with recycling agendas. I live in a condominium in northeast Baltimore County where, on every street, there are dumpsters, clearly denoted for either garbage or recycling. They are strategically placed throughout the complex. And yet when I open the lid of the garbage dumpster, I see many recyclable items. Should I have to be the one who has to differentiate between garbage and recyclables and sort out those items for my neighbors? Are there still people truly that lazy, that indifferent, to the concept?
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | June 30, 2002
Corporate America reeks of greed and misconduct? To Greg Cantori, that smells like opportunity. "Maybe after all these scandals and maybe after making enough money, people will see that volunteer jobs are more fulfilling," said Cantori, executive director of a charity, the Marion I. and Henry J. Knott Foundation in Baltimore. He hopes others tire of corporate pressures and begin looking for something more in life than "returning shareholder value" - a phrase that means profit at any price to Cantori.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 20, 2001
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Some estimates peg the number of alcoholics in the United States between 15 million and 30 million (7 to 15 percent of the population). NBC apparently views them and other problem drinkers -- and potential new drinkers -- as a lucrative advertising demographic. Perhaps because it needs money to pay for Katie Couric's new multimillion-dollar contract, this once-great network has decided to start accepting hard-liquor commercials. The rationale for this shilling for swilling decision is that the "advertising environment" is depressed.
NEWS
July 23, 1992
Young Antonio, 12 when his mother turned him in to the police, puts a human face on the dry statistics of the Baltimore Bar Association's 1991 juvenile justice report. It is a face of dire need in a subculture of hopelessness, and the lessons Antonio and his friends have drawn from the slothfulness of law enforcement is that almost nothing happens, no matter what crimes they commit. By the time something does happen, the youths involved have difficulty connecting the dots between the court action and the precipitating criminal incidents.
NEWS
October 7, 2010
Here is my opinion as a future voter: Everywhere I look there is campaign propaganda — commercials on TV, signs on lawns and roadways, and fliers stuffed in our mailbox. Just the other night I saw back-to-back commercials on a candidate that totally contradicted each other. I have a solution. The candidates should take all the money they are spending in meaningless advertisements and give it to the Bea Gaddy center so it can really help someone. (I read the article in the October 4th Sun about the center being severely low on funds and having to turn off its phone.
NEWS
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,Los Angeles Times | November 3, 2006
Scientists have unraveled the DNA of the western honeybee, a feat that researchers say could help illuminate the genetic underpinnings of social behavior. An international team of nearly 200 scientists reported last week that they have identified 10,157 genes. That's fewer than contained in the genomes of the fruit fly, mosquito or silkworm but nonetheless sufficient to produce the only nonprimate species capable of communicating through a symbolic language. The genome of Apis mellifera was published in the journal Nature, along with a series of articles in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and other scholarly journals.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2005
The eighth-graders from Glenelg Country School arrived at the Rideout Heath Apartment Complex on Friday armed with potted plants, mallets, bags of soil and youthful energy. They gathered around Glenelg Country teacher and community service coordinator David Weeks as he issued instructions. He divided the pupils into three categories of workers. Planters would use lumber to set up boxes and fill them with plants, he said. Framers were in charge of placing lumber along the perimeter of the space where the playground would be constructed.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Countryman and Andrew Countryman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 20, 2005
The Pax World funds, a pioneer in socially responsible investing that says it offers shareholders the chance "to do good while doing well," has acknowledged that one of its mutual funds has been hit by market timing. In a recent letter to shareholders, Chairman Laurence Shadek and President Thomas Grant said an internal investigation in response to Securities and Exchange Commission inquiries determined that Pax World failed to prevent investors from engaging in market timing of its High Yield Fund during 2003.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA | July 4, 2004
THOUGH emotions shouldn't influence the timing of investment decisions - which usually leads to buying high and selling low - we don't have to be indifferent about the way our investments are being used. And people who practice what's called socially responsible investing are anything but indifferent. They invest in companies that share their social and environmental interests. The most popular socially responsible portfolios these days are ones that screen stocks based on environmental, tobacco and labor issues.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 4, 2004
Talk of social responsibility and TV's quest for the right demographics may not grab the public consciousness like a suddenly R-rated Janet Jackson-Justin Timberlake Super Bowl duet. But as the dust settles on CBS' Sunday halftime show fiasco, media and pop culture experts say, these very topics, not the breast-baring, are what we as a society should be discussing. "Underlying the whole mythic rape scenario that was played out for millions to see is a really base economic imperative on the part of CBS and Viacom that I don't think should be ignored," said Dr. Shirley Peroutka, who teaches popular culture at Goucher College.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 4, 2004
Talk of social responsibility and TV's quest for the right demographics may not grab the public consciousness like a suddenly R-rated Janet Jackson-Justin Timberlake Super Bowl duet. But as the dust settles on CBS' Sunday halftime show fiasco, media and pop culture experts say, these very topics, not the breast-baring, are what we as a society should be discussing. "Underlying the whole mythic rape scenario that was played out for millions to see is a really base economic imperative on the part of CBS and Viacom that I don't think should be ignored," said Dr. Shirley Peroutka, who teaches popular culture at Goucher College.
BUSINESS
By Chau Lam and Chau Lam,New York Bureau | February 21, 1993
New York -- More and more people are putting their money where their conscience is -- by investing in companies that fit their view of a socially responsible world.One measure of the trend: The amount of money held by managers promising "socially responsible investing" jumped from $40 billion in 1984 to about $700 billion last year, according to the Minneapolis-based Social Investment Forum.Such investors generally screen out companies that offend their values. The result: no investments in the nuclear and defense industries, or in polluters.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and David Nitkin and Sarah Koenig and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2003
Howard Peters "Pete" Rawlings, a child of Baltimore public housing who rose to become one of the most powerful political leaders in Maryland, died yesterday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 66 and had been battling cancer since 1999. Mr. Rawlings spent a quarter-century representing the city in the General Assembly. With the mind of a trained mathematician and the fearlessness of a man certain of his convictions, he used his position as chairman of the House Appropriations Committee to bring change to his hometown and the state.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | June 30, 2002
Corporate America reeks of greed and misconduct? To Greg Cantori, that smells like opportunity. "Maybe after all these scandals and maybe after making enough money, people will see that volunteer jobs are more fulfilling," said Cantori, executive director of a charity, the Marion I. and Henry J. Knott Foundation in Baltimore. He hopes others tire of corporate pressures and begin looking for something more in life than "returning shareholder value" - a phrase that means profit at any price to Cantori.
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