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Social Psychology

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NEWS
March 2, 1996
Solomon E. Asch, 88, a social psychologist whose groundbreaking research on peer pressure changed the way people think about themselves in group situations, died Feb. 20 in Haverford, Pa.In 1952, Dr. Asch published "Social Psychology," a classic textbook that continues to command respect in academic circles. He was emeritus professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he taught seven years before retiring in 1979.James Barbagallo, 43, an American pianist who won the bronze medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 1982 and performed for several years as a member of the Amadeus Trio, died Monday of a heart attack at his parents' home in San Leandro, Calif.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES | April 15, 2001
"I'm a better person than I used to be," might seem the exclusive mantra of former presidents, chastened lovers and veterans of the analytic couch. But if a series of studies by two social psychologists offers any indication, the conviction that today's self is a new and improved version of yesterday's is ubiquitous. Asked to evaluate themselves in the past and in the present, the researchers found, the subjects in their studies consistently reported that they were now more competent, more socially skilled, more tolerant, more polite, more mature and less boring than they had been.
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FEATURES
By Jessica Seigel and Jessica Seigel,Chicago Tribune | April 2, 1992
The $1,575 Le Corbusier-style chair was an absolute must for his Chicago River North loft. The 29-year-old advertising copywriter also had to have the Armani eyeglasses, the Cartier watch and the Lichtenstein print.His friends say he brags about his designer purchases. Behind his back, they call him a materialist. He vehemently denies the charge.Can human nature explain why one person "needs" a Le Corbusier chair while others are content to sit on Grandma's hand-me-downs? Social scientists are beginning to study those kinds of needs as they investigate the psychology of materialism, which they define as the tendency to value things rather than people.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
"My name is Robyn Forster, and I'm a nerd," announced the 20-year-old sociology major. And she wasn't alone. The classroom at University of Maryland, Baltimore County took on the feel of a Nerds Anonymous meeting as the 17 women and one man enrolled in "Cybergrrls and Wired Women" laid bare their love affairs with the computer. Professor Sandra Shattuck, associate director of the university's Center for Women and Information Technology, beamed. "I thought the rallying around nerddom was great," said Shattuck, who came to UMBC a year ago to help the center draw women into the high-tech world.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 24, 1995
Dallas -- THERE MAY APPEAR to be no relationship between the end of the Cold War, Oklahoma City, Chechnya and Islamic fundamentalist violence. I can hear the skeptical reader asking: "Have you been smoking something, Ms. Geyer?"Well, before you stop reading and continue to be confused about the horrors of Oklahoma City, let me quote some insightful words from Don Edward Beck and Chris Cowan, two fine young analysts of the social psychology of groups and nations of our times:"This is an extremely dangerous time.
FEATURES
By Nancy Ross-Flanigan and Nancy Ross-Flanigan,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 15, 1992
Vacation. The prospect is delicious; the reality often disappoints.Try to get away, and you seem to spend more time planning, packing and driving than you spend relaxing. Kids get restless, everything costs too much, and you come home wound up tighter than before you left.But spend your vacation at home, and the days fill up with chores and errands.There must be a way to savor summer without going away -- and to avoid turning a stay-at-home vacation into a menial marathon of drudgery. We think it can be done, and we're offering a few tips to send you on your way.Most important is the mind-set.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES | April 15, 2001
"I'm a better person than I used to be," might seem the exclusive mantra of former presidents, chastened lovers and veterans of the analytic couch. But if a series of studies by two social psychologists offers any indication, the conviction that today's self is a new and improved version of yesterday's is ubiquitous. Asked to evaluate themselves in the past and in the present, the researchers found, the subjects in their studies consistently reported that they were now more competent, more socially skilled, more tolerant, more polite, more mature and less boring than they had been.
FEATURES
By Randy Dotinga and Randy Dotinga,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 2000
This fall, college students in Massachusetts will be spending time with the usual suspects from the summer of "Survivor": Rich, Kelly, Rudy, Susan and the 12 other visitors to a now-famous island called Pulau Tiga. But the students won't be watching repeats of the hit TV show for fun. It will be homework, part of a professor's quest to explore the human mind. "Survivor" is a bonanza of material about how people interact and make decisions in times of conflict, according to Tom Boone, a professor of psychology at Assumption College in Worcester, Mass.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
"My name is Robyn Forster, and I'm a nerd," announced the 20-year-old sociology major. And she wasn't alone. The classroom at University of Maryland, Baltimore County took on the feel of a Nerds Anonymous meeting as the 17 women and one man enrolled in "Cybergrrls and Wired Women" laid bare their love affairs with the computer. Professor Sandra Shattuck, associate director of the university's Center for Women and Information Technology, beamed. "I thought the rallying around nerddom was great," said Shattuck, who came to UMBC a year ago to help the center draw women into the high-tech world.
NEWS
January 18, 2004
McDaniel College will celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a film and lecture tomorrow. The film, Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin, will be shown at 3 p.m. in Lewis Recitation Hall's Decker Auditorium. One of the first "freedom riders," Rustin was an adviser to King and A. Philip Randolph, organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, but was denied his place in the limelight because he was openly gay. Human relations expert Jaiya John, founder and executive director of Soul Water Rising, an educational mission devoted to improving human relations, combating prejudice and fostering spiritual growth, will speak at 7 p.m. in Alumni Hall.
FEATURES
By Randy Dotinga and Randy Dotinga,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 2000
This fall, college students in Massachusetts will be spending time with the usual suspects from the summer of "Survivor": Rich, Kelly, Rudy, Susan and the 12 other visitors to a now-famous island called Pulau Tiga. But the students won't be watching repeats of the hit TV show for fun. It will be homework, part of a professor's quest to explore the human mind. "Survivor" is a bonanza of material about how people interact and make decisions in times of conflict, according to Tom Boone, a professor of psychology at Assumption College in Worcester, Mass.
NEWS
March 2, 1996
Solomon E. Asch, 88, a social psychologist whose groundbreaking research on peer pressure changed the way people think about themselves in group situations, died Feb. 20 in Haverford, Pa.In 1952, Dr. Asch published "Social Psychology," a classic textbook that continues to command respect in academic circles. He was emeritus professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, where he taught seven years before retiring in 1979.James Barbagallo, 43, an American pianist who won the bronze medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 1982 and performed for several years as a member of the Amadeus Trio, died Monday of a heart attack at his parents' home in San Leandro, Calif.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 24, 1995
Dallas -- THERE MAY APPEAR to be no relationship between the end of the Cold War, Oklahoma City, Chechnya and Islamic fundamentalist violence. I can hear the skeptical reader asking: "Have you been smoking something, Ms. Geyer?"Well, before you stop reading and continue to be confused about the horrors of Oklahoma City, let me quote some insightful words from Don Edward Beck and Chris Cowan, two fine young analysts of the social psychology of groups and nations of our times:"This is an extremely dangerous time.
FEATURES
By Nancy Ross-Flanigan and Nancy Ross-Flanigan,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 15, 1992
Vacation. The prospect is delicious; the reality often disappoints.Try to get away, and you seem to spend more time planning, packing and driving than you spend relaxing. Kids get restless, everything costs too much, and you come home wound up tighter than before you left.But spend your vacation at home, and the days fill up with chores and errands.There must be a way to savor summer without going away -- and to avoid turning a stay-at-home vacation into a menial marathon of drudgery. We think it can be done, and we're offering a few tips to send you on your way.Most important is the mind-set.
FEATURES
By Jessica Seigel and Jessica Seigel,Chicago Tribune | April 2, 1992
The $1,575 Le Corbusier-style chair was an absolute must for his Chicago River North loft. The 29-year-old advertising copywriter also had to have the Armani eyeglasses, the Cartier watch and the Lichtenstein print.His friends say he brags about his designer purchases. Behind his back, they call him a materialist. He vehemently denies the charge.Can human nature explain why one person "needs" a Le Corbusier chair while others are content to sit on Grandma's hand-me-downs? Social scientists are beginning to study those kinds of needs as they investigate the psychology of materialism, which they define as the tendency to value things rather than people.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | April 6, 1998
Emory University scientists says they have a lie detector-like tool that can uncover racial prejudice.Psychologist Eric Vanman and other scientists say "electromyography," or EMG, can detect tiny muscle movements the face that indicate bias as surely as an electrocardiogram, or EKG, picks up heart murmurs.Vanman's study, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found most people who pass rigorous oral and written tests indicating that they are free of prejudice really hold deep-down biases.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 25, 2008
Dr. Mary Alice Monk Klarman, a retired Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health epidemiologist, died of lung disease Friday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Roland Park Place resident was 81. Born Mary Alice Monk in Racine, Wis., she majored in music at Oberlin College and played the violin. She received a master's degree and doctorate in social psychology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Monk, who used her maiden name professionally, held posts at the University of Buffalo and at Tulane University before coming to Baltimore in 1960 and joining the Hopkins faculty.
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