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NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | June 11, 2006
There's a new, more aggressive group interested in solving social problems in Howard County called People Acting Together in Howard. The group, PATH, is having what it bills as a big, action-oriented gathering at 6:50 tonight at St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, 5976 Old Washington Road in Elkridge. Hector Rodriguez, 61, a 17-year resident of Owen Brown village, is the lead organizer for the group. It operates under the banner of the Industrial Areas Foundation, he said, which is an umbrella group that helps sponsor local organizations for social change.
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NEWS
July 1, 2014
The appointment of Carolyn Colvin as commissioner of Social Security Administration amid questions of cutback actions by Congress is laughable ( "Obama taps Colvin to lead Social Security," June 20). Why can't Congress see that it is the problem, not the solution? They are the ones who have not increased the budget to run the agency and who also allowed attorneys to file disability claim after claim that have put a stranglehold not only on the system but on the benefits paid.
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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - As Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend was honored yesterday by former President Bill Clinton at a national Democratic function, she signaled that her bid for governor was moving into the next phase. Townsend, who is expected to announce her candidacy May 5, outlined some of the themes she plans to use in her campaign, telling an audience of party activists how she helped create jobs, improve education, lower crime and rebuild some of the state's aging neighborhoods. Townsend also spoke of on her role in creating service programs, including the requirement that Maryland high school students perform community service in order to graduate.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Instead of a traditional Halloween haunted house filled with fog and ghoulish scenes, an outreach ministry in East Baltimore is offering stark glimpses into real-life issues, messages of hope and firm promises of help. The images portrayed at Reality House can be as haunting as any in a tale of horror, mostly because they are based on actual situations. Within a 46-foot-long tent pitched behind the Patterson Park Library, visitors can check out scenes that depict social ills like drug addiction, suicide and teen pregnancy.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 22, 2001
BEIJING - Of the scores of canvases Su Xinping has painted over the past two decades, few capture the drive behind modern Chinese life as deftly as "Century Tower." The painting depicts a crowd of Chinese people climbing over each other, their hands outstretched, straining to grasp an invisible tower. Variously dressed in boxy, Communist-era suits, Western business clothes or just underwear, the mob includes the late Chinese leaders Mao Tse-tung and Deng Xiaoping. To anyone living in China today, the subject is obvious: the desire to acquire and possess in a nation that seems to have swapped the social safety net of Mao's "Iron Rice Bowl" for Darwin's "Survival of the Fittest" in just a generation.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1996
Loyola College students, among the most active college volunteers in the Baltimore area, talk of being fulfilled by community service but also confess to frustrations in facing social problems.Since 1992, 60 per cent of Loyola College's undergraduates have done some community service work, many of them at least five hours a week, a record more extensive than on most campuses.The volunteer performance is so strong that some students are drawn to Loyola specifically for its service reputation rather than its academic program, President Harold E. Ridley, S.J., said.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
Story focus skews debate on schools I find it disturbing that the Anne Arundel County section of The Sun (Jan. 14) addressed the school budget issue almost entirely from the perspective of active teachers. The teachers unions are complicit in the current state of the public schools. The unions are inflexible, have shown perennial bad judgment, and are a part of the reason that multitudes of Anne Arundel County families have withdrawn from the public education system. Allowing teachers to dominate the debate serves no purpose other than to push The Sun's left-wing agenda, which is pro-union and anti-privatization, and which has no place in the Anne Arundel section.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | June 9, 1996
IMAGINE THAT a governor, frustrated by the rising costs of social problems, took a very bold step by banishing buzzwords and the kind of thinking they inspire.There could be no more fuzzy calls to ''strengthen families,'' no more endless discussion of ''systems reform'' or ''service integration.'' Instead, the governor would require specific objectives for dealing with social problems.Sure, state agencies could work to strengthen families, but only as a means toward an end. They could reform systems or integrate services or even empower communities, but only in pursuit of specific objectives.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 4, 2005
AWILD GUESS maybe, but until this newspaper reported last week on the 13-year-old accused in the fatal shooting of one man and the attempted murder of another, I'll bet most people expressing outrage about the boy and his mother's apparent lack of control over him never heard of Oswego Mall. That's not the boy's name, but the name of the modest townhouse development in Northwest Baltimore where the shootings occurred. It exists in what we sometimes refer to as "the other Baltimore," far in distance and spirit from Harborplace, Camden Yards or Canton.
NEWS
By Moses S. Koch | July 31, 1991
Maryland has taken on a controversial issue, which originated in California, and which involves the teaching of self esteem.In 1987, the California legislature appropriated $825,000, to be spent over a three-year period for a task force to study the relationship between social problems and the lack of self esteem. In sweeping words, the legislation's sponsor described it as "a pioneering effort to address the causes and cures of the major social issues that plague us all today . . . a search for a social vaccine."
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | October 2, 2012
If a politician rose in the well of Congress to urge his colleagues to take action to repel the recent Martian attack, he'd be laughed out of office and strongly encouraged to get his head examined. Pondering solutions to imaginary problems is public policy insanity. So I ask: Given that the threat of socialism swallowing America is as imaginary as a Martian invasion, why aren't politicians and television pundits who warn that something must be done to reverse redistributive welfare in the United States also treated with dismissive ridicule?
NEWS
September 29, 2011
It's unfortunate that an economist such as Peter Morici ("Yes, Social Security is a Ponzi scheme," Sept. 22) would take a partisan political position on Social Security and spread needless alarm about its future by baselessly calling it a Ponzi scheme. Ponzi schemes are short-lived investment frauds. Social Security is a social insurance program which has paid benefits for over 70 years and is projected, under very pessimistic economic assumptions, to be able to pay full benefits for the next 27 years and 80 percent of scheduled benefits into perpetuity.
NEWS
June 6, 2011
In a recent article, a well-regarded economist states that the Social Security Administration has projected that it will collect $46 billion less in cash (i.e. FICA taxes) than it will pay out in retirement and disability benefits in fiscal year 2011. However, Social Security's revenue includes $105 billion it will get from the U.S. Treasury to cover the cost of reducing the Social Security tax on employees' wages from 6.2 percent to 4.2 percent — the so-called "two percent tax holiday.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | June 15, 2007
Millions live in South African shanty towns with no running water or electricity, a vestige of apartheid that has frustrated government officials, housing advocates and aid workers. But the solution to this social ill might come from an unlikely place: Baltimore's Inner Harbor. There, in the sleek offices of real estate financier MuniMae, deal-makers are pooling millions of dollars from investors to finance the building of 400-square-foot apartments, each with a sink, toilet and small shower, for lower-income families in Johannesburg.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
Story focus skews debate on schools I find it disturbing that the Anne Arundel County section of The Sun (Jan. 14) addressed the school budget issue almost entirely from the perspective of active teachers. The teachers unions are complicit in the current state of the public schools. The unions are inflexible, have shown perennial bad judgment, and are a part of the reason that multitudes of Anne Arundel County families have withdrawn from the public education system. Allowing teachers to dominate the debate serves no purpose other than to push The Sun's left-wing agenda, which is pro-union and anti-privatization, and which has no place in the Anne Arundel section.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | June 11, 2006
There's a new, more aggressive group interested in solving social problems in Howard County called People Acting Together in Howard. The group, PATH, is having what it bills as a big, action-oriented gathering at 6:50 tonight at St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, 5976 Old Washington Road in Elkridge. Hector Rodriguez, 61, a 17-year resident of Owen Brown village, is the lead organizer for the group. It operates under the banner of the Industrial Areas Foundation, he said, which is an umbrella group that helps sponsor local organizations for social change.
NEWS
December 19, 1992
Changing times have claimed yet another Baltimore institution -- Mano Swartz, the 103-year-old family furriers.In an era when much of merchandizing has concentrated in the hands of faceless conglomerates directed from far-away cities, the history of this local company reads like a veritable period piece. It involves a 22-year-old Hungarian forest ranger named Mano Swartz, who is drawn to America by the gold rush of the 1880s, but ends of up in New York learning the fur trade. In the process he marries the sister of the Saks brothers (as in Saks Fifth Avenue)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 15, 1995
NEW YORK -- An index devised by a group of social scientists at Fordham University reports that six social ills, including child abuse and the gap between rich and poor, are at their worst recorded levels and have dragged the nation's well-being to its fourth lowest point in 24 years.The scientists also tracked their social well-being index against the Gross Domestic Product, the output of all goods and services, and concluded that the nation's economic prosperity and its social health, as measured by the index, are no longer linked.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
Edward Franklin Frazier, the Baltimore-born sociologist who had been chairman of the sociology department at Howard University and gained an international reputation as an authority on black life in the United States, seemed to fade into undeserved obscurity after his death in 1962. During his time, he was a powerful voice and the author of such seminal works as The Negro Family in the United States, Race and Culture Contacts in the Modern World, Negro Youth at the Crossways: Their Personality Development in the Middle States and Black Bourgeoisie.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 4, 2005
AWILD GUESS maybe, but until this newspaper reported last week on the 13-year-old accused in the fatal shooting of one man and the attempted murder of another, I'll bet most people expressing outrage about the boy and his mother's apparent lack of control over him never heard of Oswego Mall. That's not the boy's name, but the name of the modest townhouse development in Northwest Baltimore where the shootings occurred. It exists in what we sometimes refer to as "the other Baltimore," far in distance and spirit from Harborplace, Camden Yards or Canton.
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