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SPORTS
By Steve Gould | March 14, 2012
Major League Baseball has delivered on its pledge to formulate a policy for players' social media use, as Craig Calcaterra of NBC Sports points out . I'm not going to delve into all the details of the policy (Calcaterra does a nice job outlining them in his post), but much of what you'd expect to be in it is there. A lot of it as common sense - don't condone steroid use in a tweet, for example - but as we've seen all too many times, common sense takes a back seat when some athletes get their hands on a smartphone.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A Towson University student was arrested this week after he allegedly threatened on social media to carry out an attack at the college that he said would be "Virginia Tech part 2. " Matthew David Cole, 18, was charged Thursday with making threats of mass violence and disturbing the operation of the school. He posted $100,000 bail and was released from jail Friday. "A thorough investigation is continuing, however, at this time it has been determined that there is no longer a threat to the university community," officials wrote in an email to students and staff.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 21, 2012
In the Newtown massacre, as in all such tragic events in a free and open society, both the news and social media went all-out to provide the fullest coverage of what happened and why. The latter is not yet fully known. In too many instances, though, the legitimate quest for the truth was accompanied by abuse. The hordes of print, radio and television reporters who descended on the grieving suburban Connecticut town generally pursued their grim business with due respect for the shattered sensitivities of the families and friends most immediately involved, the ancillary victims of the semi-automatic weapon attack.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Every day companies mine online data to track consumer habits, but two University of Maryland law professors say Facebook and dating service OkCupid went too far by manipulating their users' experience to study their behavior. At the professors' urging, Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler agreed to review this week whether the companies' actions are akin to patients being pulled into medical research without their knowledge. Federal law requires participants' consent and independent oversight of such experiments, and a state law broadened those regulations.
EXPLORE
By Sara Toth | December 12, 2011
During the 1960s, baby boomers were a part of social revolution. Almost a half-century later, they're a part of another social revolution, but this time it's social media, as older generations are turning to sites like Facebook and Twitter in record numbers. More than 800 million people worldwide use Facebook, its founder Mark Zuckerburg announced in September, and nearly half of all Americans have accounts. According to data collected by iStrategyLabs, a social media marketing firm, at the beginning of 2011 there were 15.5 million Facebook users in the United States over the age of 55. That's an increase of nearly 60 percent in just one year, up from 9.7 million users over the age of 55 in 2010.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 17, 2013
The National Association of Attorneys General, headed by Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler, has announced a partnership with Facebook to make kids aware of and safety and privacy issues concerning social media. I wish them the best of luck. I recently had a peek into the sordid world of tween social media and it is not a pretty sight. I saw the messages my son and his friends were sending to each other and have now taken away all his electronic devices - cell phone , iPad and unsupervised computer privileges.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | January 2, 2010
When Walmart wanted to get the word out that it had received a huge shipment of the most sought-after toy just in time for the year-end shopping season, the retailer turned to its more than 400,000 Facebook friends first. Through teaser messages on its Facebook page, followers were asked to guess the mystery product that would soon be stocked on shelves. When Walmart revealed that the toy was the robotic hamster Zhu Zhu pets, it posted up-to-date messages and videos on when the toy would reach stores.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
From Liz Atwood: I can't believe I've come to the point where I actually would like to see the kids wasting their time playing video games.  What has driven me to this drastic change? Lately the kids have taken to wasting their time texting friends and posting pictures on Instagram and Twitter. Their new preoccupation with social media sets up a whole new challenge. In the past, I only needed to look at the rating on a game box to get a sense of whether the content was inappropriate.
NEWS
December 15, 2013
Michael Phelps has held a lot of titles. Olympic swimming champion. Philanthropist. Subway spokesman. Add a new one to the list: social media expert. The swimmer took over the official Ravens twitter account during last week's snowy last-minute victory over the Vikings, a social media stunt that, of course, spawned its own hash tag: #MPTakeover. His excitement was palpable. "THERE IT IS!!!!! Are you serious!?!?! 4TDs in 1:30!! Snowballs at M&T. Best game EVER for those who stayed!
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 10, 2012
Imagine a world where you feel the "likes" of your Facebook friends on your body? It's one vision of a future in wearable computing, in the form of a vest that inflates to squeeze your body with a "hug" each time someone "Likes" your Facebook status update, photo or video. The smarty-pants students at the MIT Media Lab, along with students at Harvard, designed a "wearable social media vest, according to the Boston.com. They call it the "Like-A-Hug" vest, and it was created for a class project.
BUSINESS
By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz and The Chicago Tribune | September 16, 2014
Cover Girl has landed in the unflattering spotlight of the NFL domestic abuse scandal as activists pressuring sponsors to boycott the league circulate a doctored ad of a female football fan with a black eye. Hunt Valley-based Cover Girl, the official beauty sponsor of the NFL, is behind the "Get Your Game Face On" ad campaign featuring models wearing the jerseys and makeup colors of each of the league's 32 teams. That includes the Baltimore Ravens, where Ray Rice was a running back until his $35 million contract was terminated last week after a video surfaced that showed him knocking his fiancee unconscious in an elevator.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
On Monday afternoon, as Baltimore was reacting to the Ravens' release of running back Ray Rice, two South Baltimore establishments took to social media, offering rewards on fan apparel bearing Rice's #27. No Idea Tavern , a drinking spot known for its irreverent social media, tweeted out a message on Monday afternoon, offering a bar tab for anyone parting with his or her Ray Rice jersey: "Anyone who surrenders their Ray Rice jerseys at...
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Maryland Food Bank will be joined over the next month by the State Police and the Baltimore Ravens for a communitywide drive to collect food and raise awareness for local families that risk going hungry. The food bank reports that nearly 780,000 Marylanders experience so-called "food insecurity," meaning they don't know if they'll be able to access food for nutritious diet. Other partners joining in the effort - which includes food banks across the country for Hunger Action Month - are the state Department of Transportation, Charm City Run and Giant Food.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Orioles center fielder Adam Jones caused a bit of a stir Thursday during the pregame Social Media Night event at Camden Yards by behaving in a way that wasn't particularly sociable. The star outfielder irked some fans in attendance with short responses during the question-and-answer session, and he earned especially negative attention for saying his favorite place in Baltimore was the airport so he could fly home. After the game, Jones said he was joking, adding that he likes the airport because it's where he picks up his friends and family who come to visit and support him. “I guess my shtick wasn't appreciated at the time,” Jones said.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
After Monday's 9-1 win against the Tampa Bay Rays that snapped a three-game losing streak, several Orioles talked in postgame interviews about how they felt like fans were panicking. Center fielder Adam Jones, shortstop J.J. Hardy and left fielder Delmon Young all made a point that losing three games to the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field was nothing more than a rough series in a long season. On Tuesday afternoon, Orioles manager Buck Showalter said he wasn't aware that his players sensed that reaction from the fan base.
NEWS
By Robert McLean | August 23, 2014
I have watched the growing popularity of the "Ice Bucket Challenge" Facebook campaign against ALS - in which people dare others to record themselves being doused with ice water and/or make a donation to an ALS charity - with growing unease over the past week. My father, a physician at the University of Maryland, died of this little-known disease in 2001, about the time viral videos were beginning to take off. Until a couple of weeks ago, it was unthinkable that more than 2 percent of Americans would even have heard of ALS, though significantly more had at least heard of Lou Gehrig's disease - its other name.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
Coppin State Sports information director Roger McAfee said the school has no blanket policy on social media, and that its relatively small staff prevents constant monitoring of what athletes are saying. "I'll go on there and take a peak," he said, "but mostly, we just try to give them guidance. " Loyola Each team is free to set its own policy, but none has banned the use of any social media tool, according to director of athletic communications Ryan Eigenbrode. "Our rule is: If you wouldn't say it to your grandmother, don't say it on Twitter," he said.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | July 11, 2011
Original scripts by local writers receive world premiere productions in the annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival. Most of the participating theaters have been in Baltimore and nearby suburbs during the festival's 30-year history, but this year, Columbia is getting in on the act via the Red Branch Theatre Company's production of Colin Riley's "Web of Deceit. " Riley's absurdist comedy tackles a highly topical theme, namely, how the Internet is affecting our personal relationships.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Word of an attack in Federal Hill appeared Monday on a neighborhood Facebook page, warning that a man had been stabbed early Sunday after being chased for his wallet. As news spread, different accounts emerged. A posting on the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association page said that, according to Baltimore police, the victim had been seen "staggering around" the 1200 block of Wall St. and had gotten into an "altercation" with a group of people. Then another posting reported additional information — that turned out to be wrong and led some to believe another man had been stabbed Monday outside the bars on Charles Street.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | June 19, 2014
America - arguably the world's most diverse, innovative, and surprising nation - is becoming a lot more predictable. And boring. According to the most recent Pew Research Poll on political polarization, Americans are becoming more consistently liberal or conservative in their opinions, and ideological thinking is much more aligned with political party membership than before. This means that the overlap between the two parties that existed two decades ago - when there were conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans - is gone.
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