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By Robert B. Reich | March 6, 2013
With the sequester now beginning, I find myself thinking about Robert F. Kennedy -- and 46 years ago, when I was an intern in his Senate office. The nation was going through a difficult time in 1967. America was deeply split over civil rights and the Vietnam War. Many of our cities were burning. The war was escalating. But RFK was upbeat. He was also busy and intense -- drafting legislation, lining up votes, speaking to the poor, inspiring the young. I was awed by his energy and optimism, and by his overriding passion for social justice and the public good.
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NEWS
March 19, 2014
I enjoyed Rex W. Huppka's recent column on why raising the minimum wage is a bad idea ("The argument against raising minimum wage," March 16). What the writer missed, however, was how raising the minimum wage impacts other employer costs such as increased Social Security and Medicare contributions as well as certain state assessments (e.g., unemployment taxes) that are based on the total wages paid. There is also the forgotten cascade effect up the wage ladder. Do the politicians who favor raising the minimum wage really think a person whose labors are already valued at the new proposed minimum wage will be happy unless their wages are similarly increased?
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NEWS
February 2, 2006
It takes a formidable personality to remain in the spotlight nearly 40 years after the death of her internationally prominent husband. But Coretta Scott King, who died this week at 78, was considered the first lady of the civil rights movement not only because she was married to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., but because she was a fierce fighter for social justice causes on her own. She knew injustice firsthand as a child growing up in rural Alabama where...
NEWS
December 29, 2013
In the spring of 2008, as the prospect that America would elect its first black president became more and more likely, the organization that did as much as any to make that watershed possible had fallen on hard times. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, America's oldest and best known civil rights group, was in disarray. It's last president and CEO had abruptly quit, and it had laid off half of its staff to balance the books. Its membership and relevance in what many were heralding as a post-racial America seemed destined to wane, and one of the defining institutions of the 20th century had no sure place in the 21st.
NEWS
By Michael Silverstein | January 29, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- Politically speaking, environmentalism has been part of a laundry list of good causes since the 1960s.If you thought protecting nature was an important priority, it has long been assumed you also support higher minimum wages, gender parity, lifting up oppressed minorities and kindred causes.But as the reality of a new environmental economics takes hold, such a moral and ego-gratifying synergism faces increasing intellectual challenges.More evolvedYes, greening is certainly a more evolved form of economic behavior that uses energy and raw materials more efficiently, producing less waste (that is to say, less pollution)
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | October 26, 1993
Cry for Justice has built-in appeal: travel, adventure, a romantic idealism, a noble cause.But it has a deadly serious destination: the rural areas of strife-torn Haiti.Even as Haitians are building boats to escape, about 75 Americans plan to travel there next month in an attempt to halt human rights abuses.The effort is sponsored by nine religious and human rights organizations -- including Pax Christi USA, a Roman Catholic-based peace group, and the Washington Office on Haiti -- and includes volunteers from 22 states, Canada, England and the Netherlands.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Staff Writer | March 9, 1992
Evangelical churches in the suburbs and the inner city can be united in advocating rights for the poor, overcoming their differences of race, culture and economic interests, an East Baltimore preacher believes.This will be a new experience for some churches that have focused their missions on personal conversion to Christianity and charitable relief, says the Rev. Joe Ehrmann, a former defensive tackle with the Baltimore Colts who runs a youth ministry in poor neighborhoods around Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1997
IN HER book, "Peace Begins with You," author Katherine Scholes says, "Peace is something that lives, grows, spreads and needs to be looked after."Feb. 14-23 has been proclaimed "Focus on Peace Week" by Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker and the Howard County Council.Howard County residents are invited to a week of programs that are to foster peace and will work to prevent violence, presented by the Howard County Clergy for Social Justice.Many of the week's events will be held in east Columbia, beginning with the Columbia Jewish Congregation sponsoring "A Meditation of Peace" Feb. 14 at the Oakland Mills Interfaith Center in Oakland Mills village.
NEWS
By Ron Goldwyn and Ron Goldwyn,Knight-Ridder news service | March 11, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - Blessed Mother Katharine Drexel is up for her last miracle.The effort to affirm an "alleged miracle" in the eyes of the Catholic Church and to win sainthood for a local heroine is moving ahead - in utter secrecy - at an unusual hearing in Philadelphia.The campaigners for Drexel's cause say this "miracle" looks good: a born-deaf infant whose newfound ability to hear has at least a dozen doctors stumped. They say the intangibles - read this as politics - look favorable as well.
NEWS
October 9, 1995
The Howard County Clergy for Social Justice will meet at 9 a.m. Wednesday at the Oakland Mills Meeting House.Topics will include the focus on Peace Week for 1996, casino gambling, housing and reduction of gun violence.The meeting is open to the public.Information: 730-7862.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
On the field next to Northeast Middle School, young refugees Abhishek Yonghang and Ahmed Osman kicked a soccer ball around, each grateful for the common connection as they adjust to a new life far from their former homes in Nepal and Somalia. Three miles away in a classroom at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, junior Wayne Young slipped a suit jacket over his school uniform for debate practice with the Urban Debate League, trying to "look the part" of the Harvard law grad he envisions himself to one day be. The lives of these Baltimore teens are among the thousands influenced by George Soros, a billionaire philanthropist who decided 15 years ago that the city, with severe crime and poverty and just enough potential, was ripe for an experiment.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Marianna Inga Burt, an attorney who represented children, died of cardiovascular disease March 12 at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 80 and lived in the Tuscany-Canterbury section of North Baltimore. Born Marianna Koenig in Hoganas, Sweden, she was the daughter of a chemist, Walter Koenig, and his wife, Elisabeth. She and her family moved to Germany in 1944 and lived in Stendal. She graduated from high school in what became East Germany during the Soviet occupation. Her family eventually left East Germany and relocated to West Germany.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 13, 2013
Be still, my somewhat jaded American Catholic heart: A Jesuit? A Jesuit from Argentina who, as archbishop then cardinal, eschewed the chauffeur-driven limousine for the public buses of Buenos Aires? A Jesuit devoted to social justice and to helping the poor? And, he took the name of Francis, one of the coolest saints. Excuse me while I have a somewhat positive reaction to the smoke signals from Rome. Here we were - that is, me and a lot of my friends among the heretical faithful - thinking the whole process of electing a new pope was an exercise in identifying the safest old European conservative in red shoes.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | March 6, 2013
With the sequester now beginning, I find myself thinking about Robert F. Kennedy -- and 46 years ago, when I was an intern in his Senate office. The nation was going through a difficult time in 1967. America was deeply split over civil rights and the Vietnam War. Many of our cities were burning. The war was escalating. But RFK was upbeat. He was also busy and intense -- drafting legislation, lining up votes, speaking to the poor, inspiring the young. I was awed by his energy and optimism, and by his overriding passion for social justice and the public good.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2012
In his 72 years, Ernest Hawkes has slept in a wide variety of places – military barracks in Vietnam, apartments in Baltimore and New York, homeless shelters. On Saturday evening, Hawkes stretched out on a flattened cardboard box in front of Baltimore's City Hall, resting his head on a black duffel bag. He propped a handwritten sign against a tote bag: "Homeless but not helpless. " "I woke up one morning and I was totally homeless," said Hawkes, explaining that he was evicted from an apartment complex for seniors three years ago after he had a dispute with the management.
NEWS
By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2012
When he was in prison, Harold Bailey said, he would often think about the homicide that resulted in his 20-year incarceration and about how his criminal record might cost him opportunities for employment or education. To continue the undergraduate education he had worked at for two years, Bailey would sit in his cell and voraciously read novels, autobiographies, academic texts — any work he could get his hands on. Since his release in 2005, Bailey has earned two degrees, a bachelor's and a master's, from Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2010
The hat, a lavender hue with a beaded design and cream-toned bow, lay at an empty place at a Coppin State University table Sunday, a reminder that Dorothy I. Height, the civil rights icon recognizable by her hats, was not among the more than 500 people there. The crowd had gathered to pay tribute to her, as the historically black university kicked off a campaign to create an enduring recognition of her achievements in civil rights, women's rights and social justice. It will establish the Dorothy I. Height Endowed Chair and Lectureship in Social Work and Social Justice and the Dorothy I. Height Center for the Advancement of Social Justice.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1998
The nation's Roman Catholic bishops called on church members yesterday to dedicate themselves daily to social justice, "to protect human life and dignity and to stand with those who are poor and vulnerable."A social justice document approved by the bishops, "Everyday Christianity: to Hunger and Thirst for Justice," is part of a national campaign called Jubilee 2000, which asks every Catholic to sign a pledge to work for social justice in the new millennium.The pledge, which will be mailed to every Catholic parish in January, includes promises to pray for greater justice and peace, to serve the poor and vulnerable and to give more generously to those in need.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
Paul Jaskunas is to be commended for his critique of the shallow materialism of conservative individualism ("A false self-reliance," Aug. 24). Individual freedom narrowly conceived as egoistic self-interest, insatiable profiteering and idolatrous devotion to the so-called free market leads inexorably to a spiritual desert. It prevents any true flowering of the human personality, which is the essence of individual freedom. The deification of the market is especially dangerous in this era of giant corporations, which are global in scope and deeply authoritarian in character.
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