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NEWS
May 11, 2012
The Republican sleight-of-hand machine is back in business ("Obama targets divisive issues," April 29). Instead of talking about the economy (for which they have no solution) or energy (no solution there, either) or global warming (GOP: "What's that"?), they want to talk about same-sex marriage, Planned Parenthood and any other "social issues" they can find to distract people's attention from the real problems facing this country. Repeated lies, negative advertising - these are the tried-and-true methods that Republicans (privately)
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Kathleen M. Happ, a retired Anne Arundel Community College educator who ws an active member of Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church on Bolton Hill, died Sept. 19 of lung cancer at Villages Hospice in The Villages, Fla. A former resident of the city's Lake Montebello neighborhood, Ms. Happ was 69. "Kathy was a truly remarkable and exceedingly talented professional. She had integrity, was always positive and a professional in her field," said Martha A. "Marty" Smith, who headed the college from 1994 until 2012, when she retired.
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By L'Oreal Thompson | April 9, 2013
For romance writer Suzie Carr, inspiration comes from everyday life. Through her lesbian romance novels, she tackles topics such as adultery, temptation, bullying and coming of age. She says she hopes those themes resonate with her readers and bring awareness to social issues. “Through my books, I feel like I'm touching lives. There's a positive message behind it,” says Carr, who lives in Elkridge. “It's more than just a love story. This literature could be mainstream because it deals with real-life issues.” Carr's first novel, “The Fiche Room” -- which is currently being adapted into a short film -- was published in 2007 by LavenderDoor.com, a website that sells e-books.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 20, 2014
Social issues are labeled "wedge issues" for a reason. They appeal to emotion. They are easily communicated. They count when ballots are cast. Throw in poll-tested rhetoric and effective manipulation of facts, and there you have it: the capture of an important voting bloc. I do not know the genesis of the term. It may have been hatched in a Nixon-era appeal to southern white conservative Democrats none too happy with court ordered school desegregation and a sharp left-hand turn by a McGovern-ite Democratic Party in 1972.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 25, 2013
Just because things can be put on the same list doesn't mean they are necessarily similar. My attic contains within it thousands of comic books, an inflatable bed, some jigsaw puzzles, some family pictures and a "Frampton Comes Alive!" album. These things are, roughly speaking, in the same location, but they're hardly of equal value, importance or function. I bring this up for the simple reason that we're hearing a lot about how the GOP must deal with "abortion and gay marriage," as if they are almost the same issue.
NEWS
April 26, 1993
Army Col. Tom MacIver will lecture on "Social Issues in the Military" at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Western Maryland College's McDaniel Lounge.The lecture, which is free, is sponsored by the college's Department of Military Science.Colonel MacIver, an educator and military policy researcher, will examine such issues as women in combat, sexual harassment, the new Democratic administration and the high numbers of minorities in the military.Questions will be encouraged.Colonel MacIver is a 1970 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy who holds a master's degree from the University of California at Davis and graduated from the Command and General Staff College.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 3, 1992
One would expect "Environmental Terror" at University of Maryland Baltimore County's fine arts gallery to be thought-provoking, given that it's about pressing social issues, that it's curated by the gallery's imaginative director, David Yager, and that it has works by important artists including Vito Acconci, John Baldessari and Robert Morris.But there are certain things about this exceptional exhibit that one might not expect.First, it's by and large composed of traditional art -- paintings, photo graphs, prints, drawings -- meant to be hung on walls.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
The weather is warm and school is out, but one group of young people is spending three weeks at Reservoir High School exploring racial tensions, social inequality and the struggle to realize the American dream. Those members of the Teen Professional Theatre camp also have to learn dance steps, blocking, dialogue and lots of big Broadway songs in three weeks as they tackle the musical Ragtime. Program founder and director Toby Orenstein said her 55-member cast, chosen from more than 200 who auditioned from throughout Central Maryland, is up to the challenge.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | May 22, 1997
Curator Judith Tannenbaum writes of her exhibit "Social Studies," at School 33, that its artists have "an interest in social issues that may be embedded in cultural myths, archetypes, stereotypes and historical events." It makes you suspicious, that statement.First, it sounds like self-important hype. And then notice how she slips in that "may be embedded," so she has an out just in case they aren't. But shouldn't she know? After all, it's her show.It turns out, though, that she does know how to pick a show and that this one holds up quite well.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music | June 12, 1994
Joan Jett has had a hectic week. Just back from Britain, where she spent several days shooting the video for her new single, "Go Home," she's in her New York offices, dividing her time between tour preparation and talking to the press about her 10th album, "Pure and Simple."Add in the day-to-day responsibilities of running her own record company, the independently distributed Blackheart Records, and it's a wonder Jett has time to think. Yet, far from sounding bedraggled, Jett seems to thrive on the activity.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | April 9, 2013
For romance writer Suzie Carr, inspiration comes from everyday life. Through her lesbian romance novels, she tackles topics such as adultery, temptation, bullying and coming of age. She says she hopes those themes resonate with her readers and bring awareness to social issues. “Through my books, I feel like I'm touching lives. There's a positive message behind it,” says Carr, who lives in Elkridge. “It's more than just a love story. This literature could be mainstream because it deals with real-life issues.” Carr's first novel, “The Fiche Room” -- which is currently being adapted into a short film -- was published in 2007 by LavenderDoor.com, a website that sells e-books.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 25, 2013
Just because things can be put on the same list doesn't mean they are necessarily similar. My attic contains within it thousands of comic books, an inflatable bed, some jigsaw puzzles, some family pictures and a "Frampton Comes Alive!" album. These things are, roughly speaking, in the same location, but they're hardly of equal value, importance or function. I bring this up for the simple reason that we're hearing a lot about how the GOP must deal with "abortion and gay marriage," as if they are almost the same issue.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
No political party enjoys losing an election, but a healthy party reacts to defeat - after a suitable period of grieving - by trying to figure out what went wrong. That's what Democrats did in the late 1980s after a string of failed presidential campaigns, and the process led to the election of Bill Clinton, a moderate Southern governor. And that's what many Republicans are trying to do now, after the defeat of Mitt Romney in November. They're pondering what went wrong and how the party needs to change.
EXPLORE
December 29, 2012
There has been much discussion in the weeks since the 2012 election about the Republican Party and its current state. Losing an election often prompts a lot of hand-wringing by the defeated party and rejoicing by those on the other side of the aisle. I've seen a lot of interesting commentary about the future of the GOP. As a Republican elected official, I wanted to share some thoughts about my party. First of all, I believe many GOP positions often get misconstrued, not just by an unfriendly media or the opposing party, but even by our own side.
NEWS
By Charlotte Allen | November 26, 2012
The Republican Party has been doing a lot of hand-wringing and finger-pointing since the presidential election. Half the conservative columnists and bloggers say the GOP lost because it overemphasized social issues such as abortion and gay marriage. The other half says the party didn't emphasize them enough. And everyone denounces Project ORCA, the campaign's attempt to turn out voters via technology. But I've got a suggestion for cutting short the GOP angst: Sarah Palin for president in 2016.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | November 25, 2012
Last week's column was all about why certain of us (49 percent nationally) continue to identify with the party of individualism and free markets. This week, a related topic: what it will take to increase that 49 percent to 51 percent in 2016. First, we should not attempt to emulate liberal Democrats on their core issues. A "Democrat-lite" approach is simply a nonstarter, despite the apparent dawning of a new progressive era in the U.S. Believe me, this too shall pass. Accordingly, any recipe for wholesale redrawing of the party platform should be resisted.
FEATURES
By Debra K. Minor and Debra K. Minor,Orlando Sentinel | February 26, 1992
The more things change, the more they stay the same. This is certainly true for Peter, Paul and Mary.Three decades ago, the folk trio confronted civil rights and social issues in music they played around New York's Greenwich Village.Today, some of those same issues are being addressed in music they perform as a group and in solo projects."Human-rights issues always top the list in a global sense," Mary Travers said during a phone interview from her Manhattan office. "But under that umbrella, you could put ecology because it certainly is a human right that we have some air to breathe.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Susan Baer of The Sun's national staff contributed to this article | February 8, 1996
DES MOINES, Iowa -- In the aftermath of Patrick J. Buchanan's upset victory in the Louisiana caucuses, the focus of the Republican presidential race shifted abruptly yesterday from taxes to conservative social issues."
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
In an interview with The Baltimore Sun, NFL Players Association president Domonique Foxworth said Friday that he was disappointed in Maryland House of Delegates member Emmett C. Burns Jr., a Democrat from Baltimore County, who sent a letter to Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti that urged him to silence Brendon Ayanbadejo . The Ravens linebacker has used his platform to voice his support for same-sex marriage. “I don't know if I can come up with a strong enough word, but his request was asinine,” Foxworth said.
NEWS
By Joe Walsh | August 7, 2012
The time for conservatives to compromise has come and gone. The time for decisive and prudential judgments in our votes has arrived, and that means abandoning Mitt Romney this election. One of the great mistakes conservatives make when voting today is misjudging and mischaracterizing our political opponents. Words such as "socialist, radical, and communist" are tossed around with little regard to their historical meaning or modern implications. Then, we portray every election as a "turning point" in history, making over-exaggerated claims about the consequences of a political loss.
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