Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSocial Impact
IN THE NEWS

Social Impact

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter | February 14, 2011
And now for something completely different: an exotic financial instrument designed to help vulnerable Americans — not drive them into foreclosure. Today, the White House plans to ask Congress for permission to conduct a $100 million test of "social impact bonds," a promising, experimental investment scheme out of England designed to get better results from publicly funded social services by harnessing the discipline of the private market. Under a social impact bond arrangement, investors put up the money to run privately managed social programs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Jealous, who stepped down in December, is joining a West Coast venture capital firm specializing in startups that diversify the tech industry and aim to have a positive social impact. Jealous, who will continue to reside in Silver Spring, will become a partner in the Kapor Center for Social Impact, joining entrepreneurs and center co-founders Mitchell Kapor and Freada Kapor Klein, the center said Tuesday. Kapor, which backs firms through its investment arm, Kapor Capital, works to close gaps in access, opportunity, wealth and participation.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Jealous, who stepped down in December, is joining a West Coast venture capital firm specializing in startups that diversify the tech industry and aim to have a positive social impact. Jealous, who will continue to reside in Silver Spring, will become a partner in the Kapor Center for Social Impact, joining entrepreneurs and center co-founders Mitchell Kapor and Freada Kapor Klein, the center said Tuesday. Kapor, which backs firms through its investment arm, Kapor Capital, works to close gaps in access, opportunity, wealth and participation.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
Regarding Anne D. Neal's commentary on St. Mary's College of Maryland, how sad it was to read such an uneducated piece published by a usually trustworthy source ("Campus cautionary tale," May 30). The article was a perfect example of manipulation of facts. Granted, St. Mary's is more expensive than the University of Maryland College Park and other institutions. But Ms. Neal's article fails to report that we benefit from small class sizes, which requires more class participation than sitting in a lecture hall with several hundred students.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 18, 2012
A bunch of new patent applications from Bank of America reveal that the company's R&D lab has been working on new mobile technologies that would enable smartphone users to analyze their environment with their smartphone's video camera ; recognize the objects around them, including those with embedded sensors; and generate automatic budgeting and wish lists . The North Carolina banking powerhouse is known within the banking industry for...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | October 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's proposal to raise cigarette taxes by 75 cents a pack may put the smoker's adage of walking a mile for a Camel to the ultimate test.At $3 to $4 a pack, teens and young adults -- the most price-sensitive group of potential smokers -- are more likely to avoid smoking, say health experts in California and Canada, where hefty cigarette taxes have been imposed.This is just one of the many likely impacts on American society of the proposed cigarette tax.With little empirical evidence at hand, experts and professionals are looking to Canada and, to a lesser extent, California to gauge the social impact of Mr. Clinton's proposed tax.Canada implemented federal excise taxes on cigarettes almost 10 years ago and has been increasing the amount incrementally ever since.
NEWS
April 9, 2011
Now that the two Maryland casinos have announced estimated profits of over $13 million last month, I guess we're supposed to stand and applaud them and say to those who objected to casinos, "See, I told you they would make money; congrats to the state of Maryland for making such a wise decision" ("Daily Briefing," April 6). Now let's look at the truth behind the story. Where is this $13 million plus coming from? From your neighbors, your kids, your grandparents, your moms and dads.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
Regarding Anne D. Neal's commentary on St. Mary's College of Maryland, how sad it was to read such an uneducated piece published by a usually trustworthy source ("Campus cautionary tale," May 30). The article was a perfect example of manipulation of facts. Granted, St. Mary's is more expensive than the University of Maryland College Park and other institutions. But Ms. Neal's article fails to report that we benefit from small class sizes, which requires more class participation than sitting in a lecture hall with several hundred students.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1996
Maryland has 11,692 nonprofit organizations that the Internal Revenue Service considers eligible for tax deductions -- a loose invisible empire whose economic and social impact is considerable but whose details as a group are vague.Some of the nonprofits are as small as garden clubs and PTAs. Others are as large and well-known as universities and hospitals. Some offer programs and services, others provide money.For the first time, 4,000 of them are being surveyed statewide to outline a Maryland portrait.
FEATURES
By John Jurgensen and John Jurgensen,HARTFORD COURANT | July 29, 2004
Two years after John Travolta strutted down the street to the pumping Bee Gees bass line of "Stayin' Alive," a brick-size piece of technology gave the rest of us the power to do the same. It was 1979 - 25 years ago this month - when Sony started selling the Walkman, a device so iconic its name would come to stand for all personal, portable stereo devices, landing in dictionaries and often losing its uppercase "W." Sony gave people a way to move through life to the theme music of their choosing.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | September 18, 2012
A bunch of new patent applications from Bank of America reveal that the company's R&D lab has been working on new mobile technologies that would enable smartphone users to analyze their environment with their smartphone's video camera ; recognize the objects around them, including those with embedded sensors; and generate automatic budgeting and wish lists . The North Carolina banking powerhouse is known within the banking industry for...
NEWS
April 9, 2011
Now that the two Maryland casinos have announced estimated profits of over $13 million last month, I guess we're supposed to stand and applaud them and say to those who objected to casinos, "See, I told you they would make money; congrats to the state of Maryland for making such a wise decision" ("Daily Briefing," April 6). Now let's look at the truth behind the story. Where is this $13 million plus coming from? From your neighbors, your kids, your grandparents, your moms and dads.
NEWS
February 22, 2011
In "Private money, public good" (Feb. 14) Gadi Dechter's discussion of the "social impact bonds" proposed by the Obama administration draws attention to a market-driven solution that may address at least two challenges in the public, or social, sector. First, too many non-profit organizations lack sufficient rigor to be held accountable for results. Second, philanthropists and capital investors need a new framework for engagement in the big social problems of our time, especially in finding solutions to the crisis in public education.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter | February 14, 2011
And now for something completely different: an exotic financial instrument designed to help vulnerable Americans — not drive them into foreclosure. Today, the White House plans to ask Congress for permission to conduct a $100 million test of "social impact bonds," a promising, experimental investment scheme out of England designed to get better results from publicly funded social services by harnessing the discipline of the private market. Under a social impact bond arrangement, investors put up the money to run privately managed social programs.
NEWS
By Charles Piller and Charles Piller,Los ANgeles Times | January 11, 2007
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation announced yesterday that it will review its investments to determine whether its holdings are socially responsible. In addition to what it called a continuing review of "our approach to investments," the foundation said on its Web site, "we will review other strategies that can fulfill a social responsibility role, both in terms of their aspirations and in understanding the impact that they may have. We will also formalize the process by which Bill and Melinda Gates analyze and review these issues."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 2006
CHICAGO -- Byron Hurt takes pains to say that he is a fan of hip-hop, but over time, says Hurt, a 36-year-old filmmaker, dreadlocks hanging below his shoulders, "I began to become very conflicted about the music I love." A new documentary by Hurt, Hip Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes, questions the violence, degradation of women and homophobia in much of rap music. Scheduled to go on the air in February as part of the PBS series Independent Lens, the documentary is being shown now at high schools, colleges and Boys and Girls Clubs, and in other forums, as part of an unusual public campaign sponsored by the Independent Television Service, which is based in San Francisco and helped finance the film.
NEWS
February 22, 2011
In "Private money, public good" (Feb. 14) Gadi Dechter's discussion of the "social impact bonds" proposed by the Obama administration draws attention to a market-driven solution that may address at least two challenges in the public, or social, sector. First, too many non-profit organizations lack sufficient rigor to be held accountable for results. Second, philanthropists and capital investors need a new framework for engagement in the big social problems of our time, especially in finding solutions to the crisis in public education.
NEWS
By Charles Piller and Charles Piller,Los ANgeles Times | January 11, 2007
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation announced yesterday that it will review its investments to determine whether its holdings are socially responsible. In addition to what it called a continuing review of "our approach to investments," the foundation said on its Web site, "we will review other strategies that can fulfill a social responsibility role, both in terms of their aspirations and in understanding the impact that they may have. We will also formalize the process by which Bill and Melinda Gates analyze and review these issues."
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, M. WILLIAM SALGANIK AND FRANK D. ROYLANCE and JONATHAN BOR, M. WILLIAM SALGANIK AND FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTERS | March 10, 2006
Older Americans are healthier, wealthier and better educated than ever, but the expected doubling of the elderly population by 2030 will create profound social and economic challenges, according to a federal report released yesterday. The report, by the U.S. Census Bureau and National Institute on Aging, contains hopeful and humbling news about growing old. People over 65 live with fewer disabilities than in years past, but that often means taking multiple medications and depending on artificial joints, pacemakers and other devices.
FEATURES
By John Jurgensen and John Jurgensen,HARTFORD COURANT | July 29, 2004
Two years after John Travolta strutted down the street to the pumping Bee Gees bass line of "Stayin' Alive," a brick-size piece of technology gave the rest of us the power to do the same. It was 1979 - 25 years ago this month - when Sony started selling the Walkman, a device so iconic its name would come to stand for all personal, portable stereo devices, landing in dictionaries and often losing its uppercase "W." Sony gave people a way to move through life to the theme music of their choosing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.