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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | December 31, 2000
"An Hour Before Daylight: Memories of my Rural Boyhood," by Jimmy Carter. Simon & Shuster. 356 pages. $26. Twenty-four years ago, Jimmy Carter arose from the obscurity of a one-term governor of Georgia to become the 39th president of the United States, and the nation seemed a bit taken aback at what it had done. After all, for more than a century the South had loomed in the collective imagination as an exotic place, defined chiefly by its novels -- from the syrupy sentimentality of Margaret Mitchell, to the ribald satire of Erskine Caldwell, to the brooding mysticism of William Faulkner.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 21, 2009
People enter the Anne Arundel County Courthouse to get a marriage license, to get divorced, to settle disputes, to testify, and to take care of all sorts of things in their lives. Add one more reason: to visit the just-opened courthouse museum. Founders say the museum, some eight years in the making, weaves together the area's social fabric, history and the law. The goal is to show that the little courthouse in Annapolis not only aired the dirty laundry of the day but dealt with big issues of their eras because the brick building was, and still is, where all aspects of society intersect.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 3, 1994
The Maryland Historical Society is changing its focus from one that emphasizes decorative arts to a more broad-based social history approach, director Dennis Fiori announced yesterday.The far-ranging plan to restructure the society will result in two key personnel changes: Chief curator Jennifer Goldsborough will leave the society Jan. 1, and former curator Gregory Weidman has moved to an administrative position."We have great people working here, but the society is not structured in ways to meet its goals of interpreting Maryland's past in the broadest way," said Mr. Fiori, explaining that the curatorial changes are part of a restructuring plan he's been developing since coming to the society from the Concord Museum in Massachusetts in March.
NEWS
February 11, 2007
At Canaan's Edge By Taylor Branch One of the greatest of American stories has found its great chronicler in Baltimore's Taylor Branch. Beginning with Parting the Waters in 1988, followed 10 years later by Pillar of Fire, and closing now with At Canaan's Edge, Branch has given the short life of Martin Luther King Jr. and the nonviolent revolution he led the epic treatment they deserve. The three books of Branch's trilogy are lyrical and dramatic, social history as much as biography, woven from the ever more complex strands of King's movement, with portraits of figures like Lyndon Johnson, Bob Moses, J. Edgar Hoover and Diane Nash as compelling as that of his central character.
NEWS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Contributing Writer | March 23, 1993
Clay pottery shards from about 1,000 B.C., a 1910 medicine bottle that once contained Dr. Price's Delicious Flavoring Extracts and a 1993 Diet Pepsi can.It's all trash, but without it archaeologists wouldn't know anything about those who have lived before us.That's one of the messages Ann Arrundell County Historical Society Executive Director Beth P. Nowell, staff archaeologist Esther Doyle Read and her husband, Tim Doyle, convey in an exhibit that opens...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
"Popped Culture: A Social History of Popcorn in America," by Andrew F. Smith (Smithsonian Institution Press, 264 pages, $16.95) Popcorn is, well, light stuff. But few entertainment food forms are as deep in America's character as it is. This volume is a comprehensive, scholarly but utterly enchanting exploration of the explosive fluffy kernels from their earleist beginnings (back in Western Hemisphere prehistory) to the present. Popcorn became a major American thing in the early 1800s - and no, there is not a shred of evidece that it was present at the first Thanksgiving.
NEWS
February 11, 2007
At Canaan's Edge By Taylor Branch One of the greatest of American stories has found its great chronicler in Baltimore's Taylor Branch. Beginning with Parting the Waters in 1988, followed 10 years later by Pillar of Fire, and closing now with At Canaan's Edge, Branch has given the short life of Martin Luther King Jr. and the nonviolent revolution he led the epic treatment they deserve. The three books of Branch's trilogy are lyrical and dramatic, social history as much as biography, woven from the ever more complex strands of King's movement, with portraits of figures like Lyndon Johnson, Bob Moses, J. Edgar Hoover and Diane Nash as compelling as that of his central character.
FEATURES
November 1, 2002
What: A benefit for Literacy Works Inc. When: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday at the Shops at Kenilworth, 800 Kenilworth Drive, Towson Admission: $50 in advance; $60 at the door. Call: 410-887-2001 Alice McDermott, 1998 National Book Award winner and Book Bash honorary chair, Child of My Heart, fiction Madison Smartt Bell, Anything Goes, fiction Connie Briscoe, P.G. County, fiction P.M. Forni, Choosing Civility: The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct, social science Von Hardesty, Lindbergh: Flight's Enigmatic Hero, history Herbert Harwood Jr., Royal Blue Line, transportation/history Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall, Growing Up in a Korean Kitchen, cooking Haynes Johnson, The Best of Times, social history Laura Lippman, The Last Place, mystery Antonio J. and Jonna H. Mendez, Spy Dust, true life/politics Claire Messud, When the World Was Steady, fiction Paul McMullen, Maryland Basketball: Tales from Cole Field House, sports/regional Jerdine Nolen, Plantzilla, children's Ted Patterson, Golden Voices of Baseball, sports Michael H. Rogers, Answering Their Country's Call, history Gilbert Sandler, Small Town Baltimore, regional Elizabeth Spires, Now the Green Blade Rises, poetry
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
When Mary Catherine Kahl began teaching history at the old Towson State Teachers College in 1942, the No. 8 streetcar connected the sleepy Baltimore County seat of Towson with the outside world, and steam trains crossed York Road on a steel bridge.Miss Kahl, who spent 46 years at what is now Towson University -- half of that time chairing a history department she helped shape -- died in her sleep Wednesday at the Edenwald retirement community. She was 78.Diminutive and soft-spoken but firm, Miss Kahl was a favorite of faculty members and students.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Nova and By Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | July 7, 2002
Snobbery, The American Version, by Joseph Epstein. Houghton Mifflin Co. 288 pages. $25. Reading this witty and informative book is an odd experience, since it says in public the things that one usually only says in private, and the accumulated effect of them is at once horrifying and exhilarating. Often you find yourself putting the book down and saying, out loud, "My god, he didn't say that, too, did he?" If nothing else, Joseph Epstein knows that if one is going to write a book about snobbery, the best tool is breathtaking honesty.
FEATURES
November 1, 2002
What: A benefit for Literacy Works Inc. When: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday at the Shops at Kenilworth, 800 Kenilworth Drive, Towson Admission: $50 in advance; $60 at the door. Call: 410-887-2001 Alice McDermott, 1998 National Book Award winner and Book Bash honorary chair, Child of My Heart, fiction Madison Smartt Bell, Anything Goes, fiction Connie Briscoe, P.G. County, fiction P.M. Forni, Choosing Civility: The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct, social science Von Hardesty, Lindbergh: Flight's Enigmatic Hero, history Herbert Harwood Jr., Royal Blue Line, transportation/history Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall, Growing Up in a Korean Kitchen, cooking Haynes Johnson, The Best of Times, social history Laura Lippman, The Last Place, mystery Antonio J. and Jonna H. Mendez, Spy Dust, true life/politics Claire Messud, When the World Was Steady, fiction Paul McMullen, Maryland Basketball: Tales from Cole Field House, sports/regional Jerdine Nolen, Plantzilla, children's Ted Patterson, Golden Voices of Baseball, sports Michael H. Rogers, Answering Their Country's Call, history Gilbert Sandler, Small Town Baltimore, regional Elizabeth Spires, Now the Green Blade Rises, poetry
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 29, 2002
BOSTON - Not long ago, a friend of our intimate acquaintance stood before a doorstopper of a book, read the flap jacket, flipped through the preface, lifted it as if it were something assigned by her personal trainer and wondered out loud, "Do I have to actually read it? Or could I just download it?" While the software is not yet available to allow us to download books directly into our brains, there's nothing new about the impulse to take a short cut through a long, arduous read. Why just this year, literary consumers are being offered an expanding line of, um, literary products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Nova and By Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | July 7, 2002
Snobbery, The American Version, by Joseph Epstein. Houghton Mifflin Co. 288 pages. $25. Reading this witty and informative book is an odd experience, since it says in public the things that one usually only says in private, and the accumulated effect of them is at once horrifying and exhilarating. Often you find yourself putting the book down and saying, out loud, "My god, he didn't say that, too, did he?" If nothing else, Joseph Epstein knows that if one is going to write a book about snobbery, the best tool is breathtaking honesty.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 2001
NEW YORK - Of all the remarkable things about New York City's Municipal Archives, the most extraordinary, by far, is its very survival. The collection - 3 million pounds of materials, ranging from the original 1654 Dutch sales slip for the purchase of Coney Island, to a trove of stereoscopic Victorian pornography assembled by an anti-vice crusader - has weathered centuries of profound neglect. It has been lodged in a succession of makeshift spaces, including a city pier and the attic of a fire-prone pizza parlor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
"Popped Culture: A Social History of Popcorn in America," by Andrew F. Smith (Smithsonian Institution Press, 264 pages, $16.95) Popcorn is, well, light stuff. But few entertainment food forms are as deep in America's character as it is. This volume is a comprehensive, scholarly but utterly enchanting exploration of the explosive fluffy kernels from their earleist beginnings (back in Western Hemisphere prehistory) to the present. Popcorn became a major American thing in the early 1800s - and no, there is not a shred of evidece that it was present at the first Thanksgiving.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | December 31, 2000
"An Hour Before Daylight: Memories of my Rural Boyhood," by Jimmy Carter. Simon & Shuster. 356 pages. $26. Twenty-four years ago, Jimmy Carter arose from the obscurity of a one-term governor of Georgia to become the 39th president of the United States, and the nation seemed a bit taken aback at what it had done. After all, for more than a century the South had loomed in the collective imagination as an exotic place, defined chiefly by its novels -- from the syrupy sentimentality of Margaret Mitchell, to the ribald satire of Erskine Caldwell, to the brooding mysticism of William Faulkner.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 1997
Millions of Americans visit national parks and battlefields every year for what may be their only regular dose of American history, but historians who have begun scrutinizing the exhibits, films and lectures there have found some of them one-sided and disturbingly out of date.Under an agreement with the National Park Service, which has had trouble keeping up with recent changes in the study of history, teams of scholars have begun re-examining how the agency presents the past at such places as the Civil War battlefield of Antietam and the Little Bighorn battlefield in Montana.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 2001
NEW YORK - Of all the remarkable things about New York City's Municipal Archives, the most extraordinary, by far, is its very survival. The collection - 3 million pounds of materials, ranging from the original 1654 Dutch sales slip for the purchase of Coney Island, to a trove of stereoscopic Victorian pornography assembled by an anti-vice crusader - has weathered centuries of profound neglect. It has been lodged in a succession of makeshift spaces, including a city pier and the attic of a fire-prone pizza parlor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
When Mary Catherine Kahl began teaching history at the old Towson State Teachers College in 1942, the No. 8 streetcar connected the sleepy Baltimore County seat of Towson with the outside world, and steam trains crossed York Road on a steel bridge.Miss Kahl, who spent 46 years at what is now Towson University -- half of that time chairing a history department she helped shape -- died in her sleep Wednesday at the Edenwald retirement community. She was 78.Diminutive and soft-spoken but firm, Miss Kahl was a favorite of faculty members and students.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 1997
Millions of Americans visit national parks and battlefields every year for what may be their only regular dose of American history, but historians who have begun scrutinizing the exhibits, films and lectures there have found some of them one-sided and disturbingly out of date.Under an agreement with the National Park Service, which has had trouble keeping up with recent changes in the study of history, teams of scholars have begun re-examining how the agency presents the past at such places as the Civil War battlefield of Antietam and the Little Bighorn battlefield in Montana.
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