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August 31, 2011
When writer Lisa Kawata mentioned the term “social enterprise” to me a few months ago, I nodded vaguely, wondering to myself if that had something to do with Facebook. Once she'd explained the concept to me, I was enamored with it. These are people who value giving back so much that they've built it into their business model. Or, as Loyola professor Peter Lorenzi puts it, they have a sense of “intangible wealth.” Greenbridge Pottery in Dayton is one such local business.
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By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
When models strut down the outdoor catwalk at The Village of Cross Keys' annual One Great Fall fashion show on Sept. 20, the sartorial showcase will be about more than hemlines and high heels. Cross Keys, an upscale enclave of residences, boutiques and cafes in North Baltimore, will utilize the occasion to benefit the House of Ruth Maryland Inc., which provides services aimed at domestic violence victims. While the glamour and beauty of fashion may seem incompatible with the ugly and violent behavior of domestic abuse, organizers are billing the event as one that, ultimately, empowers women.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
World Hope International, a Christian relief and development nonprofit group, has been providing charitable aid and small loans to farmers and entrepreneurs in Sierra Leone for years. Now the Northern Virginia group wants to go into business with those it aims to help. It has started a for-profit arm to build an industrial park and helped launch a juice plant that would process the West African country's bounty of mangoes and pineapples. World Hope's effort is part of a recalibration of how some nonprofit organizations approach their work — applying the strategies of capitalism to achieve their goals.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Vann Ellison is right about three things in his recent commentary on poverty and social enterprise ("Beyond government," July 10): Our country hasn't done an effective job of addressing poverty. Partisan gridlock weakens the social safety net and social enterprises can be effective in getting people back to work, even if they can't ensure wages sufficient for them to afford market-rate housing. Unfortunately, Mr. Ellison misses the mark on just about everything else. That poverty persists in the richest nation in the history of history is worthy of serious exploration.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | August 30, 2011
Chances are that if you drank a cup of coffee recently at the Bean Hollow Cafe in Ellicott City you sipped that steaming brew from a mug made by Greenbridge Pottery in Dayton. It feels good to support a local business or two. What feels even better is knowing that every time a mug or a plate or a yarn bowl is purchased directly from Greenbridge Pottery, a portion of the sale helps others in our community and around the world. It's called social enterprise. “We were making pottery to make ourselves and our customers happy by trying to make something useful and beautiful.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | December 25, 2009
Inside the Doughy Dog truck, workers are preparing more than hot dogs, breakfast sandwiches and mini-doughnuts. They're preparing themselves for more stable lives, working toward increased self-sufficiency one chubby hot dog at a time. This is food with a social mission: The big red Doughy Dog truck is a business venture of the Arundel House of Hope, a 17-year-old nonprofit organization in Glen Burnie that helps homeless people. The organization's clients get paid job experience and growing self-confidence.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | September 21, 2012
Thirty years ago, Enterprise Community Partners began with three women, one man and a dream. The women were members of a local church, and the man was Jim Rouse, the real estate developer responsible for Columbia. Together, they had a dream that everyone should have the opportunity to live in an affordable home. “The company was founded as a social enterprise that uses public and private partnership to achieve the goal that everyone has an affordable home in a diverse, thriving community,” says Terri Ludwig, president and CEO of Enterprise, which is based in Columbia.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
Inside the Doughy Dog truck, workers are preparing more than hot dogs, breakfast sandwiches and mini-doughnuts. They're preparing themselves for more stable lives, working toward increased self-sufficiency one chubby hot dog at a time. This is food with a social mission: The big red Doughy Dog truck is a business venture of the Arundel House of Hope, a 17-year-old nonprofit organization in Glen Burnie that helps homeless people. The organization's clients get paid job experience and growing self-confidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Baltimore native Jason Winer will deliver the commencement address May 10 at Stevenson University, the school announced this week. Here's the release: Baltimore-born actor and Hollywood director Jason Winer will give the keynote address at Stevenson University's 60th Commencement on Friday, May 10, 2013. Winner of the 2010 Directors Guild of America (DGA) Award for Outstanding Direction of a Comedy Series for the pilot of ABC's Modern Family, Winer was named one of Variety's 2011 “10 Directors to Watch.” A graduate of Baltimore's Friends School and of Northwestern University, Winer is an alumnus of Chicago's Improv Olympic Theatre and began his career as an actor, improvisor, and photographer before making the transition to directing with the short film The Adventures of Big Handsome Guy and His Little Friend in 2005.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Vann Ellison is right about three things in his recent commentary on poverty and social enterprise ("Beyond government," July 10): Our country hasn't done an effective job of addressing poverty. Partisan gridlock weakens the social safety net and social enterprises can be effective in getting people back to work, even if they can't ensure wages sufficient for them to afford market-rate housing. Unfortunately, Mr. Ellison misses the mark on just about everything else. That poverty persists in the richest nation in the history of history is worthy of serious exploration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Baltimore native Jason Winer will deliver the commencement address May 10 at Stevenson University, the school announced this week. Here's the release: Baltimore-born actor and Hollywood director Jason Winer will give the keynote address at Stevenson University's 60th Commencement on Friday, May 10, 2013. Winner of the 2010 Directors Guild of America (DGA) Award for Outstanding Direction of a Comedy Series for the pilot of ABC's Modern Family, Winer was named one of Variety's 2011 “10 Directors to Watch.” A graduate of Baltimore's Friends School and of Northwestern University, Winer is an alumnus of Chicago's Improv Olympic Theatre and began his career as an actor, improvisor, and photographer before making the transition to directing with the short film The Adventures of Big Handsome Guy and His Little Friend in 2005.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | September 21, 2012
Thirty years ago, Enterprise Community Partners began with three women, one man and a dream. The women were members of a local church, and the man was Jim Rouse, the real estate developer responsible for Columbia. Together, they had a dream that everyone should have the opportunity to live in an affordable home. “The company was founded as a social enterprise that uses public and private partnership to achieve the goal that everyone has an affordable home in a diverse, thriving community,” says Terri Ludwig, president and CEO of Enterprise, which is based in Columbia.
EXPLORE
August 31, 2011
When writer Lisa Kawata mentioned the term “social enterprise” to me a few months ago, I nodded vaguely, wondering to myself if that had something to do with Facebook. Once she'd explained the concept to me, I was enamored with it. These are people who value giving back so much that they've built it into their business model. Or, as Loyola professor Peter Lorenzi puts it, they have a sense of “intangible wealth.” Greenbridge Pottery in Dayton is one such local business.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | August 30, 2011
Chances are that if you drank a cup of coffee recently at the Bean Hollow Cafe in Ellicott City you sipped that steaming brew from a mug made by Greenbridge Pottery in Dayton. It feels good to support a local business or two. What feels even better is knowing that every time a mug or a plate or a yarn bowl is purchased directly from Greenbridge Pottery, a portion of the sale helps others in our community and around the world. It's called social enterprise. “We were making pottery to make ourselves and our customers happy by trying to make something useful and beautiful.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
World Hope International, a Christian relief and development nonprofit group, has been providing charitable aid and small loans to farmers and entrepreneurs in Sierra Leone for years. Now the Northern Virginia group wants to go into business with those it aims to help. It has started a for-profit arm to build an industrial park and helped launch a juice plant that would process the West African country's bounty of mangoes and pineapples. World Hope's effort is part of a recalibration of how some nonprofit organizations approach their work — applying the strategies of capitalism to achieve their goals.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
Inside the Doughy Dog truck, workers are preparing more than hot dogs, breakfast sandwiches and mini-doughnuts. They're preparing themselves for more stable lives, working toward increased self-sufficiency one chubby hot dog at a time. This is food with a social mission: The big red Doughy Dog truck is a business venture of the Arundel House of Hope, a 17-year-old nonprofit organization in Glen Burnie that helps homeless people. The organization's clients get paid job experience and growing self-confidence.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
When models strut down the outdoor catwalk at The Village of Cross Keys' annual One Great Fall fashion show on Sept. 20, the sartorial showcase will be about more than hemlines and high heels. Cross Keys, an upscale enclave of residences, boutiques and cafes in North Baltimore, will utilize the occasion to benefit the House of Ruth Maryland Inc., which provides services aimed at domestic violence victims. While the glamour and beauty of fashion may seem incompatible with the ugly and violent behavior of domestic abuse, organizers are billing the event as one that, ultimately, empowers women.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
Can a company do good deeds and still expect a profit? Yes, say the heads of four fledgling Baltimore-area firms.The four start-ups last week received grants totaling $50,000 from AT&T Capital Corp., which is co-sponsored by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.This year's Partners For Growth program provides seed money for a woodworking company that hires former juvenile offenders, a construction firm that renovates homes for the poor, a health care company that creates enriched adult day care programs, and a counseling and logistical service to help seniors navigate housing transitions.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | December 25, 2009
Inside the Doughy Dog truck, workers are preparing more than hot dogs, breakfast sandwiches and mini-doughnuts. They're preparing themselves for more stable lives, working toward increased self-sufficiency one chubby hot dog at a time. This is food with a social mission: The big red Doughy Dog truck is a business venture of the Arundel House of Hope, a 17-year-old nonprofit organization in Glen Burnie that helps homeless people. The organization's clients get paid job experience and growing self-confidence.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
Can a company do good deeds and still expect a profit? Yes, say the heads of four fledgling Baltimore-area firms.The four start-ups last week received grants totaling $50,000 from AT&T Capital Corp., which is co-sponsored by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.This year's Partners For Growth program provides seed money for a woodworking company that hires former juvenile offenders, a construction firm that renovates homes for the poor, a health care company that creates enriched adult day care programs, and a counseling and logistical service to help seniors navigate housing transitions.
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