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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2005
FRANKFURT -- Germany's two major political parties sealed an agreement yesterday to govern the country together under Angela Merkel, who would become the country's first female chancellor. But after six weeks of grueling negotiations, which exposed fissures on both sides and necessitated deep compromises, the new government faced a murky future, shorn of the reformist zeal that many here believed is necessary to fix Germany's stagnant economy and stem its soaring unemployment. "This can become a coalition of new possibilities," Merkel said after the conclusion of talks between her Christian Democratic Union and the Social Democratic Party of the departing chancellor, Gerhard Schroeder.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2005
FRANKFURT -- Germany's two major political parties sealed an agreement yesterday to govern the country together under Angela Merkel, who would become the country's first female chancellor. But after six weeks of grueling negotiations, which exposed fissures on both sides and necessitated deep compromises, the new government faced a murky future, shorn of the reformist zeal that many here believed is necessary to fix Germany's stagnant economy and stem its soaring unemployment. "This can become a coalition of new possibilities," Merkel said after the conclusion of talks between her Christian Democratic Union and the Social Democratic Party of the departing chancellor, Gerhard Schroeder.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 1999
BERLIN -- The political plight of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder intensified yesterday as his Social Democratic Party was thrown out of government in the eastern state of Thuringia and suffered severe setbacks in the Ruhr, Germany's industrial heartland.The plunge in support for Schroeder, who swept to power a year ago, was symbolized by his party's failure to win municipal elections in Dortmund. The city is so tied to the labor movement that it was called "the capital of the Social Democratic Party" by former Chancellor Willy Brandt.
NEWS
By Christian Retzlaff and Christian Retzlaff,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 2, 2005
BERLIN - Facing high unemployment and an inability to reform the welfare state, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder deliberately lost a confidence vote in Parliament yesterday, opening the way for early elections that are expected to push his liberal coalition from power. Schroeder called for the vote after a series of political defeats and widening divisions within his Social Democratic Party over how to reform one of Europe's most generous welfare states. President Horst Koehler is expected to dissolve Parliament in the coming weeks, and new elections are likely by mid-September, a year before Schroeder's term was to expire.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 15, 1990
BERLIN -- The parties of Chancellor Helmut Kohl's ruling coalition swept five of six state elections yesterday, four of them in the former territory of East Germany. The show of strength leaves Mr. Kohl the overwhelming favorite to retain the chancellor's post in national elections just seven weeks away.In addition to giving Mr. Kohl the inside track to become the first freely elected all-German chancellor in nearly 60 years, the extent of the coalition parties' victory yesterday also enabled the Kohl government to recapture a majority in the Bundesrat, the federal Parliament's upper house, whose composition is determined by the country's 16 states.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 1992
BONN, Germany -- The parties in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's coalition government agreed yesterday on a proposal for a change in the country's constitution to curb an influx of refugees in an effort to halt a rash of violence against foreigners.The change would require a two-thirds majority in both houses of Parliament, but many members of the opposition Social Democratic Party, which controls one of the legislative chambers, are against it.To the Social Democrats, an amendment to the constitution would be a shameful political concession to neo-Nazi brutality after a series of firebombings and beatings that have killed 10 foreigners so far this year.
NEWS
September 23, 1998
EUROLAND, POISED to unify the currencies of 11 countries under one central bank on New Year's Day, expects seasoned government from the dominant member. If the polls before the Sept. 27 election are to be believed, Germany may not provide it.No politician in Europe has the solid accomplishments of Germany's four-term, 16-year Christian Democratic chancellor, Helmut Kohl, who unified Germany when much of Europe was opposed and pushed through the euro when many doubted it could be done.For this, his compatriots may chuck the conservative Mr. Kohl and pick inexperienced leadership from the left.
NEWS
January 6, 2003
Conrad L. Hall, 76, a leading Hollywood cinematographer who was nominated nine times for Academy awards and won twice - for 1969's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and 1999's American Beauty, died Saturday in Santa Monica, Calif., of complications of bladder cancer. Mr. Hall filmed nearly three dozen movies in a career that stretched more than three decades. He won honors including a lifetime achievement award from the American Society of Cinematography in 1994 and an outstanding achievement award from the cinematography society in 1988 for Tequila Sunrise.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 1994
ROME -- Under sparkling Palm Sunday skies, the vanguard of 48 million Italian voters meandered leisurely to the polls for national elections expected to recast their troubled nation's political future.The voting for a new national legislature resumes this morning. Interior Ministry officials do not expect authoritative returns before tomorrow, but exit polls should be available by tonight.Issues weighed less in the campaign than stark left, center and right divisions carved around personalities and their political parties.
NEWS
By Christian Retzlaff and Christian Retzlaff,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 2, 2005
BERLIN - Facing high unemployment and an inability to reform the welfare state, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder deliberately lost a confidence vote in Parliament yesterday, opening the way for early elections that are expected to push his liberal coalition from power. Schroeder called for the vote after a series of political defeats and widening divisions within his Social Democratic Party over how to reform one of Europe's most generous welfare states. President Horst Koehler is expected to dissolve Parliament in the coming weeks, and new elections are likely by mid-September, a year before Schroeder's term was to expire.
NEWS
January 6, 2003
Conrad L. Hall, 76, a leading Hollywood cinematographer who was nominated nine times for Academy awards and won twice - for 1969's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and 1999's American Beauty, died Saturday in Santa Monica, Calif., of complications of bladder cancer. Mr. Hall filmed nearly three dozen movies in a career that stretched more than three decades. He won honors including a lifetime achievement award from the American Society of Cinematography in 1994 and an outstanding achievement award from the cinematography society in 1988 for Tequila Sunrise.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 13, 1999
BERLIN -- The political plight of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder intensified yesterday as his Social Democratic Party was thrown out of government in the eastern state of Thuringia and suffered severe setbacks in the Ruhr, Germany's industrial heartland.The plunge in support for Schroeder, who swept to power a year ago, was symbolized by his party's failure to win municipal elections in Dortmund. The city is so tied to the labor movement that it was called "the capital of the Social Democratic Party" by former Chancellor Willy Brandt.
NEWS
September 23, 1998
EUROLAND, POISED to unify the currencies of 11 countries under one central bank on New Year's Day, expects seasoned government from the dominant member. If the polls before the Sept. 27 election are to be believed, Germany may not provide it.No politician in Europe has the solid accomplishments of Germany's four-term, 16-year Christian Democratic chancellor, Helmut Kohl, who unified Germany when much of Europe was opposed and pushed through the euro when many doubted it could be done.For this, his compatriots may chuck the conservative Mr. Kohl and pick inexperienced leadership from the left.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | April 10, 1994
BERLIN -- There is something familiar about this 40-something man's quest for his country's highest office.Maybe it's his top three issues: the economy, the economy and the economy, stupid, although his enemies say he'd be a tax-and-spend nightmare.Maybe it's the way he's steering a leftward political party back toward the middle after 12 years out of power. Or perhaps it's his choice of American heroes: John F. Kennedy.This man with the Clintonesque credentials is Rudolph Scharping, and if his party's lead in opinion polls holds up through the October elections, he'll be the next chancellor of Germany.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 1994
ROME -- Under sparkling Palm Sunday skies, the vanguard of 48 million Italian voters meandered leisurely to the polls for national elections expected to recast their troubled nation's political future.The voting for a new national legislature resumes this morning. Interior Ministry officials do not expect authoritative returns before tomorrow, but exit polls should be available by tonight.Issues weighed less in the campaign than stark left, center and right divisions carved around personalities and their political parties.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | March 8, 1993
BERLIN -- The extreme rightwing Republikaner Party scored impressive gains in the prosperous central state of Hesse yesterday, raising the profile of a group that had campaigned against the presence of refugees and asylum-seekers and dealing a setback to Germany's main parties.The Republikaners, who are led by Franz Schonhuber, a gray-haired former SS officer in wartime Nazi Germany, came from virtually nowhere to win 8.3 percent of the votes cast throughout the state's local elections, far more than most pollsters had predicted.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | March 8, 1993
BERLIN -- The extreme rightwing Republikaner Party scored impressive gains in the prosperous central state of Hesse yesterday, raising the profile of a group that had campaigned against the presence of refugees and asylum-seekers and dealing a setback to Germany's main parties.The Republikaners, who are led by Franz Schonhuber, a gray-haired former SS officer in wartime Nazi Germany, came from virtually nowhere to win 8.3 percent of the votes cast throughout the state's local elections, far more than most pollsters had predicted.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 6, 1992
Britain goes to the polls Thursday to put a quiet end to 13 years of radical government. The election closes the astonishing epoch of Margaret Thatcher. It makes no great difference whether Prime Minister John Major or Neil Kinnock wins this election and forms the next government. The radical years are over.Mrs. Thatcher's legacy has overshadowed Mr. Major's year at Downing Street, where he has been occupied chiefly in disengaging the Tory Party from the problems she left behind, such as the poll tax. The legacy is a mixed one, but far more positive than that of her friend Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 1992
BONN, Germany -- The parties in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's coalition government agreed yesterday on a proposal for a change in the country's constitution to curb an influx of refugees in an effort to halt a rash of violence against foreigners.The change would require a two-thirds majority in both houses of Parliament, but many members of the opposition Social Democratic Party, which controls one of the legislative chambers, are against it.To the Social Democrats, an amendment to the constitution would be a shameful political concession to neo-Nazi brutality after a series of firebombings and beatings that have killed 10 foreigners so far this year.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 6, 1992
Britain goes to the polls Thursday to put a quiet end to 13 years of radical government. The election closes the astonishing epoch of Margaret Thatcher. It makes no great difference whether Prime Minister John Major or Neil Kinnock wins this election and forms the next government. The radical years are over.Mrs. Thatcher's legacy has overshadowed Mr. Major's year at Downing Street, where he has been occupied chiefly in disengaging the Tory Party from the problems she left behind, such as the poll tax. The legacy is a mixed one, but far more positive than that of her friend Ronald Reagan.
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