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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2003
Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. first voted against slot machines back in the early 1960s as a young state senator when the question was whether to ban the gambling devices in Southern Maryland. In his quiet way, he's still fighting them today - not as a crusader, but as someone who has read the research and concluded the social and economic costs outweigh the benefits to the public coffers. Curran, Maryland's longest-serving attorney general, will continue the battle today as guest speaker at the National Coalition Against Legalized Gambling's annual conference at the Holiday Inn at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
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NEWS
By Paul Davies | August 22, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's special session on casino gambling should have been called a rubberstamp session. Because there really was no legislative session, let alone public debate or analysis regarding the negative economic and social impact that will come from more gambling. Instead, lawmakers basically rammed through a pre-packaged measure that will enable casinos to strip more wealth from Maryland residents. For a governor who once described slot machines as a "morally bankrupt" way to fund education, Mr. O'Malley's transformation to casino supporter is especially troubling.
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NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2003
When a slot machine bill backed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was rejected this year to give lawmakers time to study the issue more carefully, Barbara Knickelbein couldn't have been happier. But the anti-gambling activist's delight has turned to dismay. She and other gambling opponents say the state legislative study panel appears to be focused on where to put slot machines -- not whether it makes sense for Maryland to legalize them. "It's like a done deal, that we're going to have slots," said Knickelbein, a Glen Burnie housewife and co-chairwoman of NOcasiNO Maryland.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 18, 2005
THAT WAS A NICE little speech Doug Duncan delivered Wednesday on the perils of slot machine money as salvation for Maryland's economy. He obviously did some homework, and he knows how to deliver a heartfelt argument. If Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. could make either claim, we'd probably have slot machines across the state by now, for better or worse. Poor Ehrlich has made gambling the centerpiece of his first two years in office, and gotten nowhere. Without slots, what's his big accomplishment so far?
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Maryland faces staggering social costs in the form of increased crime, bankruptcies, divorces and other ills if it opens the door to slot machines, an array of speakers told anti-gambling activists at a national conference in Linthicum yesterday. The message was delivered by state Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. and two university professors who study gambling and its impact nationally. In his remarks to the National Coalition Against Gambling Expansion, Curran pointed to a research study that shows the economic costs of gambling far outweigh the benefits.
NEWS
November 7, 2003
FOR MARYLANDERS dazzled by the easy money of legalizing slot machines, an advance glimpse of its costs can be had inside a forlorn Baltimore rowhouse, home to the Compulsive Gambling Center Inc., said to be the nation's oldest such treatment center. There, you find patients such as Alex Horn of Pikesville, who owned a cleaning supply business until, he says, he got hooked on video poker, wasted a fortune, took to robbing banks and ended up in jail for almost 12 years. "It's hard to imagine what someone goes through," he says of his gambling.
NEWS
December 9, 2002
Slot machines siphon off funds from businesses Greg Garland's article "Risky Bet on Slots" (Nov. 24) was fantastic, and I hope our legislators and governor-elect pay attention to it. Gambling consultant Steve Rittvo estimates that up to "85 percent would be `new money' - money from people in the region who are not already traveling to Delaware, Atlantic City or West Virginia to gamble." What he neglects to say is that a University of New Orleans study for the Louisiana Gaming Commission showed that for each dollar in slots revenue, 87 cents is diverted from existing businesses.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 18, 2005
THAT WAS A NICE little speech Doug Duncan delivered Wednesday on the perils of slot machine money as salvation for Maryland's economy. He obviously did some homework, and he knows how to deliver a heartfelt argument. If Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. could make either claim, we'd probably have slot machines across the state by now, for better or worse. Poor Ehrlich has made gambling the centerpiece of his first two years in office, and gotten nowhere. Without slots, what's his big accomplishment so far?
NEWS
By Paul Davies | August 22, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's special session on casino gambling should have been called a rubberstamp session. Because there really was no legislative session, let alone public debate or analysis regarding the negative economic and social impact that will come from more gambling. Instead, lawmakers basically rammed through a pre-packaged measure that will enable casinos to strip more wealth from Maryland residents. For a governor who once described slot machines as a "morally bankrupt" way to fund education, Mr. O'Malley's transformation to casino supporter is especially troubling.
NEWS
January 31, 2004
Q: Should the state approve slot machine gambling? If so, where would you put the slots? Would you favor a referendum on the issue? The state should reject slots. Slots come with heavy social costs. These costs include increased embezzlement, which results in business bankruptcies and unemployment of innocent employees. Slots create opportunities for compulsive gamblers to bankrupt their families. They also result in increased alcoholism, domestic abuse, divorce and suicide rates. Several studies have found that the increased social costs could exceed any additional state revenue.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2004
A study released yesterday by a research firm that also has done paid work for racetrack owners confirms that the addition of slot machines would bring new jobs to their communities, but at the cost of substantial social turmoil. The report, commissioned by business groups in Baltimore and Prince George's County, came as the once fast-moving slots legislation was stalled in the state Senate over the issue of whether to permit expanded gambling at Ocean Downs. Democratic senators said they believe putting slots at the harness-racing track near Ocean City makes economic sense, though some privately acknowledge that the site is likely to be eventually removed from the list of eligible gambling locations under intense pressure from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Republican senators.
NEWS
January 31, 2004
Q: Should the state approve slot machine gambling? If so, where would you put the slots? Would you favor a referendum on the issue? The state should reject slots. Slots come with heavy social costs. These costs include increased embezzlement, which results in business bankruptcies and unemployment of innocent employees. Slots create opportunities for compulsive gamblers to bankrupt their families. They also result in increased alcoholism, domestic abuse, divorce and suicide rates. Several studies have found that the increased social costs could exceed any additional state revenue.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
Although slot machines would generate tens of millions of dollars for state government, they carry heavy social costs that far outweigh the benefits, an academic expert who studies gambling told Maryland lawmakers yesterday. "It's not even a close call," said Earl L. Grinols, an economics professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Grinols and Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., a staunch gambling foe, appeared before the House Ways and Means Committee to offer their views on the impact of legalizing slots.
NEWS
November 7, 2003
FOR MARYLANDERS dazzled by the easy money of legalizing slot machines, an advance glimpse of its costs can be had inside a forlorn Baltimore rowhouse, home to the Compulsive Gambling Center Inc., said to be the nation's oldest such treatment center. There, you find patients such as Alex Horn of Pikesville, who owned a cleaning supply business until, he says, he got hooked on video poker, wasted a fortune, took to robbing banks and ended up in jail for almost 12 years. "It's hard to imagine what someone goes through," he says of his gambling.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Maryland faces staggering social costs in the form of increased crime, bankruptcies, divorces and other ills if it opens the door to slot machines, an array of speakers told anti-gambling activists at a national conference in Linthicum yesterday. The message was delivered by state Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. and two university professors who study gambling and its impact nationally. In his remarks to the National Coalition Against Gambling Expansion, Curran pointed to a research study that shows the economic costs of gambling far outweigh the benefits.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2003
Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. first voted against slot machines back in the early 1960s as a young state senator when the question was whether to ban the gambling devices in Southern Maryland. In his quiet way, he's still fighting them today - not as a crusader, but as someone who has read the research and concluded the social and economic costs outweigh the benefits to the public coffers. Curran, Maryland's longest-serving attorney general, will continue the battle today as guest speaker at the National Coalition Against Legalized Gambling's annual conference at the Holiday Inn at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
Ask many African-Americans, in Baltimore and beyond, their views on how the media depict them and the answer likely will be impassioned, elaborate and bitter.But blacks are not the only ones complaining. Latinos, Native Americans and Asian-Americans also lament their portrayals in newspapers and on television and radio.Experts predict the perception will not improve soon.As fewer young people choose careers in journalism and affirmative action falls out of favor, the pool of minority journalists likely will shrink, they say. Many believe more inadequate coverage of minority communities will result.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
Although slot machines would generate tens of millions of dollars for state government, they carry heavy social costs that far outweigh the benefits, an academic expert who studies gambling told Maryland lawmakers yesterday. "It's not even a close call," said Earl L. Grinols, an economics professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Grinols and Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., a staunch gambling foe, appeared before the House Ways and Means Committee to offer their views on the impact of legalizing slots.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2003
When a slot machine bill backed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was rejected this year to give lawmakers time to study the issue more carefully, Barbara Knickelbein couldn't have been happier. But the anti-gambling activist's delight has turned to dismay. She and other gambling opponents say the state legislative study panel appears to be focused on where to put slot machines -- not whether it makes sense for Maryland to legalize them. "It's like a done deal, that we're going to have slots," said Knickelbein, a Glen Burnie housewife and co-chairwoman of NOcasiNO Maryland.
NEWS
December 9, 2002
Slot machines siphon off funds from businesses Greg Garland's article "Risky Bet on Slots" (Nov. 24) was fantastic, and I hope our legislators and governor-elect pay attention to it. Gambling consultant Steve Rittvo estimates that up to "85 percent would be `new money' - money from people in the region who are not already traveling to Delaware, Atlantic City or West Virginia to gamble." What he neglects to say is that a University of New Orleans study for the Louisiana Gaming Commission showed that for each dollar in slots revenue, 87 cents is diverted from existing businesses.
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