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Social Contract

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NEWS
November 6, 2011
Commentator Anthony Marcavage's view that both liberals and conservatives misunderstand the meaning of the social contract appears admirably balanced at first blush ("Both sides wrong about social contract," Commentary, Nov. 3). However, he mischaracterizes U.S. Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren's argument in order to conclude that she is wrong about what we each owe one another and society. Ms. Warren's argument that the corporate CEO didn't get rich on his own as he moved his product over roads paid for by all taxpayers is not, as Mr. Marcavage states, an argument that CEOs benefit disproportionately from the social contract simply because they are rich.
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NEWS
February 21, 2014
If letter writer David Kulick truly wishes to defend the social contract ( "The chair in the parking space: A symbol of incivility," Feb. 20), then my retort is thus: The chair in the road is just a social contract. I plowed, therefore, you do not park. To both foster some mutual humanity in this instance and to not simply allow people to go around freeloading off the hard work of others, let's modify the contract. If you have plowed a space, here or elsewhere, you may park in a plowed spot.
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NEWS
By Anthony Marcavage | November 2, 2011
We cannot find the social contract in the National Archives or the Library of Congress, but most citizens acknowledge it through day-to-day respect for the social order. Yet, because the social contract exists in our cultural consciousness, and not in written form, its terms will always be elusive. The differences between conservatives and liberals over wealth and class demonstrate this ambiguity, and nowhere are these as stark as in the views of Elizabeth Warren, the leading Democratic candidate for Senate in Massachusetts, and Republican presidential candidate and current tea party favorite Herman Cain.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 24, 2013
One way to view Detroit's bankruptcy -- the largest bankruptcy of any American city in history -- is as a failure of political negotiations over how financial sacrifices should be divided among the city's creditors, city workers and municipal retirees, requiring a court to decide instead. It could also be seen as the inevitable culmination of decades of union agreements offering unaffordable pension and health benefits to city workers. But there's a more basic story here, and it's being replicated across America: Americans are segregating by income more than ever before.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | June 24, 1992
New York -- I give a lot of speeches, and answer a lot of questions after them, and I have always been surprised after an hour of relatively dispassionate analysis of the American condition, by how seldom I am asked: ''What would you do?'' Is it because of kindness? Boredom? Despair?But after weeks of audience leniency, someone did ask me that after a recent speech. And I said:* Make the federal income tax more progressive -- again.* Bring the troops home from Europe and put the money saved into elementary and secondary education.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
Anthony Marcavage continues a vital conversation about the nation's social contract ("Both sides wrong about social contract," Nov. 3) and promotes an at-first-blush balanced view that both liberals and conservatives are wrong - certainly plausible in this day and age. However, Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren's argument is mischaracterized in order to conclude falsely that her contention about what we each owe one another and society is...
NEWS
February 21, 2014
If letter writer David Kulick truly wishes to defend the social contract ( "The chair in the parking space: A symbol of incivility," Feb. 20), then my retort is thus: The chair in the road is just a social contract. I plowed, therefore, you do not park. To both foster some mutual humanity in this instance and to not simply allow people to go around freeloading off the hard work of others, let's modify the contract. If you have plowed a space, here or elsewhere, you may park in a plowed spot.
NEWS
December 8, 2011
According to letter writer Mark L. Alexander, "millionaires became millionaires because they offered a good or service that other people wanted. They owe society nothing from these transactions. Their sole obligation was to the people with whom they entered into a contract to provide the good or service. " I think the writer ("Rich owe no debt to society," Dec. 7) is sadly mistaken. A quote from Elizabeth Warren says what I would like to say but she says it much better. Ms. Warren writes, "There is nobody in this country who got rich on his own. You built a factory out there - good for you. But I want to be clear.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | June 23, 1998
LOVE BLOOMS on the job, the item in a glossy magazine announced to the world, with pictures of the saucy, middle-aged couple inset into the story.The only hint that this was no ordinary courtship between two interesting and powerful people came buried in the piece: "Both will have to leave long-term marriages," the reporter noted, almost as an afterthought. The story made no further mention of the other lives left like so much flotsam in the wake of this romance, an abandoned wife and husband, a child who will spend his adolescence shuttling between two households.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 30, 1993
Patsy Gladden, 48, worked for 17 years as a housekeeper at a downtown Baltimore hotel, but she never earned enough to move out of public housing.Phyllis Neal, 35, a former $7.20-an-hour bookkeeper in a discount store downtown, can't find a new job that pays enough to cover her modest mortgage.Even after years of public investment to redevelop Baltimore and create good jobs, too many African-American city residents like Ms. Gladden and Ms. Neal can't make enough to support their families, according to BUILD, a church-based group with a social agenda.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 15, 2012
Question: What is the most guaranteed applause line in American politics today? Answer: Anything that allegedly benefits that fine group of Americans known as the middle class. Want proof? Well, just about every other sentence uttered at the Democratic National Convention paid homage to this esteemed socioeconomic group. Ditto for the GOP in Tampa, where speaker after speaker spoke of the virtues of the middle-income worker. From a political perspective, the drumbeat makes sense.
NEWS
December 8, 2011
According to letter writer Mark L. Alexander, "millionaires became millionaires because they offered a good or service that other people wanted. They owe society nothing from these transactions. Their sole obligation was to the people with whom they entered into a contract to provide the good or service. " I think the writer ("Rich owe no debt to society," Dec. 7) is sadly mistaken. A quote from Elizabeth Warren says what I would like to say but she says it much better. Ms. Warren writes, "There is nobody in this country who got rich on his own. You built a factory out there - good for you. But I want to be clear.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
Anthony Marcavage continues a vital conversation about the nation's social contract ("Both sides wrong about social contract," Nov. 3) and promotes an at-first-blush balanced view that both liberals and conservatives are wrong - certainly plausible in this day and age. However, Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren's argument is mischaracterized in order to conclude falsely that her contention about what we each owe one another and society is...
NEWS
By Anthony Marcavage | November 2, 2011
We cannot find the social contract in the National Archives or the Library of Congress, but most citizens acknowledge it through day-to-day respect for the social order. Yet, because the social contract exists in our cultural consciousness, and not in written form, its terms will always be elusive. The differences between conservatives and liberals over wealth and class demonstrate this ambiguity, and nowhere are these as stark as in the views of Elizabeth Warren, the leading Democratic candidate for Senate in Massachusetts, and Republican presidential candidate and current tea party favorite Herman Cain.
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | December 5, 2002
BALTIMORE NATIVE SON John Rawls died last week. His obituary writers included encomia like "most important political thinker of the 20th century," "best theorist of his generation," "America's leading political philosopher." But the average American probably has never heard of the James Bryant Conant university professor emeritus at Harvard, much less cracked the cover of his 1971 magnum opus and now classic, A Theory of Justice. Americans don't put much faith in philosophers and have never had much use for tweedy professors when it comes to the rough and tumble of politics.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | February 9, 2002
TODAY, CLASS, our civics lesson will cover the difference between a republic and a democracy. First, we begin with Webster's New World Dictionary definition of both. Republic: a political order in which the supreme power is held by a body of citizens who are entitled to vote for officers and representatives responsible to them. Democracy: government exercised either directly by the people or through elected representatives. You will notice, class, that there's a difference between the two. In a democracy, everybody votes.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | April 7, 1993
A church-based community group wants downtown businesses to provide more full-time jobs and to promote minorities to management positions as conditions for government development loans.The targets of Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) include downtown retailers in addition to hotels and the convention center, which were developed with federal money."Public subsidies must carry a public obligation," the Rev. Arnold Howard, co-chairman of BUILD, said yesterday at a news conference attended by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | December 5, 2002
BALTIMORE NATIVE SON John Rawls died last week. His obituary writers included encomia like "most important political thinker of the 20th century," "best theorist of his generation," "America's leading political philosopher." But the average American probably has never heard of the James Bryant Conant university professor emeritus at Harvard, much less cracked the cover of his 1971 magnum opus and now classic, A Theory of Justice. Americans don't put much faith in philosophers and have never had much use for tweedy professors when it comes to the rough and tumble of politics.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | September 16, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It's 4 a.m. when Barbara Ehrenreich wakes up in a cold sweat. A writer with 20 years experience, it's not a deadline that's shaken her out of peaceful slumber. "I'm thinking about the table whose order I screwed up so that one of the boys didn't get his kiddie meal until the rest of the family had moved on to their Key Lime pies," she writes in her latest book, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America (Metropolitan Books, $23). This is not the kind of thing that most best-selling authors and social critics think about late at night.
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