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By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | April 7, 1995
In a string of comic sketches where women play women, women play men and women play women playing men, no gender, age or ethnic group is safe from biting sarcasm."
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NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
The final presidential debate Monday drew a TV audience of 59.2 million viewers, according to Nielsen Media. That's down from the 67.2 million and 65.6 million for the first and second debates, respectively. But it still shows huge interest -- particularly when you consider that the debate was up against a game seven in the National League Championship series and "Monday Night Football," which together drew more than 18 million viewers. Mentions in social media were down as well -- to about 8 million, according to Bluefin Labs.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 15, 2005
Many pictures that win the Oscar don't have the resonance of a doorbell. Once their title is called at the podium, they set off no echoes in the culture. The Best Years of Our Lives, William Wyler's tough-minded, poignant chronicle of three World War II veterans coming home, mattered mightily as social commentary in 1946 - and matters just as much as history right now. Lance Morrow's new book, subtitled Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power, takes place two years later, but he gives it the main title, The Best Years of Their Lives, and he uses Wyler's film to capture a complex postwar mood, not of triumph but "of anger, of self-pity."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
Janeane Garofalo follows politics, talks about politics, at times even finds it funny - although in an absurd, disturbing way. Sometimes, politics even creeps its way into her stand-up routines. But Garofalo is not, she stresses, a political comic. Those who go to her Baltimore show this weekend - scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday at Rams Head Live - expecting an evening of political humor may end up disappointed. "I don't know why some people would think, after all these years I've been doing stand-up, that politics is the dominant theme of my show, because it isn't," the 44-year-old comic says over the phone from Long Island, where she had just finished a gig at the Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 10, 2009
Janeane Garofalo follows politics, talks about politics, at times even finds it funny - although in an absurd, disturbing way. Sometimes, politics even creeps its way into her stand-up routines. But Garofalo is not, she stresses, a political comic. Those who go to her Baltimore show this weekend - scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday at Rams Head Live - expecting an evening of political humor may end up disappointed. "I don't know why some people would think, after all these years I've been doing stand-up, that politics is the dominant theme of my show, because it isn't," the 44-year-old comic says over the phone from Long Island, where she had just finished a gig at the Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
The final presidential debate Monday drew a TV audience of 59.2 million viewers, according to Nielsen Media. That's down from the 67.2 million and 65.6 million for the first and second debates, respectively. But it still shows huge interest -- particularly when you consider that the debate was up against a game seven in the National League Championship series and "Monday Night Football," which together drew more than 18 million viewers. Mentions in social media were down as well -- to about 8 million, according to Bluefin Labs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman | October 26, 1995
Actor/comedian Michael Winslow performs at Slapstix Comedy Club tonight through Saturday. The comedian, best known for his role as Sgt. Larvelle Jones in the "Police Academy" movies, can produce more than 10,000 sound effects -- everything from Jimi Hendrix playing the guitar to sirens, helicopters and explosions. But Winslow is more than just a sound effects man. His stand-up style is a mixture of wild noises and social commentary. He tends to stay away from racier material and political humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | October 22, 2000
Kurt Weill, who was born 100 years ago and died 50 years ago, left an extraordinary mark on the 20th century. Keenly aware of how the darkest impulses of human nature were being unleashed in the early decades of the century, Weill used music -- and piercing texts by the likes of Bertold Brecht -- as a means of analysis and protest. From full-scale satire and irony in such music-theater classics as "The Three-Penny Opera" and "Mahagonny" to intimate cabaret songs, Weill's creations have a uniquely affecting power.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | January 22, 2000
ALL OF MY LIFE I've been a devotee of people theater, the art that showcases the little human dramas of ordinary life. With a background of Baltimore, I've watched the show of character, story and dialogue unfold without having to pay the tariff of a Morris Mechanic or Center Stage. Some of the most bravura performances were enacted on the oak and pine floors of the old house on Guilford Avenue where I lived for 20-some years. The players were all my family. They lived to tell a good story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and By Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | June 30, 2002
Don't Believe Your Lying Eyes, by Blair S. Walker. Ballantine. 225 pages. $22.95. Blair S. Walker, reared in Baltimore, has worked for The Sun and other newspapers. When he decided to write mystery novels, Walker created Baltimore newspaper reporter Darryl Billups, who, not so incidentally, is African-American like his creator. Don't Believe Your Lying Eyes, the third Billups novel, is filled with Baltimore scenes, insights into journalism, social commentary on race and other vital matters -- not to mention a captivating plot.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 10, 2008
From the start, the Roots were an anomaly: a rap group that uses live instruments in lieu of samples and turntables. In the '90s, as hip-hop became flashier and the genre's biggest hits mostly glorified American pathologies - ruthless violence and gross consumerism - the nine-piece Philly unit became more earnestly political. Over the course of 18 years, the Roots, who play Pier Six Pavilion tonight, have remained anomalous. Save for two gold albums - 1999's Things Fall Apart, which contained the Grammy-winning "You Got Me," featuring Erykah Badu, and 2003's Phrenology - the band has never had a true smash.
NEWS
By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
People endlessly complain that Hollywood is full of dopey, superficial films bereft of anything new to say. And they're right. Anyone looking for art that is edgy or relevant - and inspires comment - is turning to Internet video, which has become the true engine driving our pop culture. Nothing demonstrates this better than the viral success of Alanis Morissette's "My Humps," which surfaced a few weeks ago on YouTube and quickly became the most popular video on the channel, attracting 5.5 million views, easily outdistancing such rivals as "Otters Holding Hands."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 15, 2005
Many pictures that win the Oscar don't have the resonance of a doorbell. Once their title is called at the podium, they set off no echoes in the culture. The Best Years of Our Lives, William Wyler's tough-minded, poignant chronicle of three World War II veterans coming home, mattered mightily as social commentary in 1946 - and matters just as much as history right now. Lance Morrow's new book, subtitled Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon in 1948: Learning the Secrets of Power, takes place two years later, but he gives it the main title, The Best Years of Their Lives, and he uses Wyler's film to capture a complex postwar mood, not of triumph but "of anger, of self-pity."
FEATURES
February 27, 2004
Osama Rated PG-13. Sun score: *** The Triumph of Love and Yentl present cross-dressing heroines who victoriously invade bastions of male learning and get close to their true loves. But the 12-year-old in boy's drag at the center of Osama knows catastrophe is near when, midway through the story, the Taliban forces her into a militant Islamic school. At the start of "the first entirely Afghan film shot since the rise and fall of the Taliban," this delicate child wants to enjoy being a girl.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 13, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - Cue music. (Man with accordion assaults the ears.) Lights! (They flicker a bit, but the studio brightens.) Cameras! (The picture seems slightly unfocused, but it will do.) And ... finally: Live, from Afghanistan! It's Saturday night! (So what if it's only live in a sort-of kind-of way.) More than 700 people applaud wildly. Those who can whistle do. For after more than six years in the dark, Afghanistan's longest-running, even if limping, variety and quiz show is back on the airwaves, drawing standing-room-only crowds to the theater where it is taped and attracting people to the country's few remaining televisions like moths to light bulbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and By Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | June 30, 2002
Don't Believe Your Lying Eyes, by Blair S. Walker. Ballantine. 225 pages. $22.95. Blair S. Walker, reared in Baltimore, has worked for The Sun and other newspapers. When he decided to write mystery novels, Walker created Baltimore newspaper reporter Darryl Billups, who, not so incidentally, is African-American like his creator. Don't Believe Your Lying Eyes, the third Billups novel, is filled with Baltimore scenes, insights into journalism, social commentary on race and other vital matters -- not to mention a captivating plot.
NEWS
By WILLIAM NEIKIRK | June 29, 1993
Washington. -- In Steven Spielberg's ''Jurassic Park,'' the camera momentarily focuses in on a rack of T-shirts and other dinosaur souvenirs that its fictional developer, Dr. John Hammond, hopes to cash in on once the park becomes popular.Disaster strikes before he can realize his dream, but in real life the T-shirt scene has many movie critics buzzing.Was Mr. Spielberg delivering serious social commentary directed at a materialistic, entertainment-driven culture manipulated by advertising and clever commercial tie-ins?
FEATURES
February 27, 2004
Osama Rated PG-13. Sun score: *** The Triumph of Love and Yentl present cross-dressing heroines who victoriously invade bastions of male learning and get close to their true loves. But the 12-year-old in boy's drag at the center of Osama knows catastrophe is near when, midway through the story, the Taliban forces her into a militant Islamic school. At the start of "the first entirely Afghan film shot since the rise and fall of the Taliban," this delicate child wants to enjoy being a girl.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 31, 2001
As someone who has long railed against network television for ignoring social class differences, I should be dancing on the rooftop at the arrival of "The Oblongs," a new animated series on WB about a family of have-nots living in a valley of toxic waste. The series gets right to it, opening on the front doors of a mansion on a hill. The doors open, and out walks a young, handsome, blond-haired man in a monogrammed bathrobe. He picks up the morning paper, looks at the headline and smiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | October 22, 2000
Kurt Weill, who was born 100 years ago and died 50 years ago, left an extraordinary mark on the 20th century. Keenly aware of how the darkest impulses of human nature were being unleashed in the early decades of the century, Weill used music -- and piercing texts by the likes of Bertold Brecht -- as a means of analysis and protest. From full-scale satire and irony in such music-theater classics as "The Three-Penny Opera" and "Mahagonny" to intimate cabaret songs, Weill's creations have a uniquely affecting power.
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