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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 23, 2001
Landmark nonfiction television should not be this much fun. But People Like Us: Social Class in America, a documentary premiering tonight on PBS, is one of those rare films that will make you smile even as it changes the way you see the world. People Like Us is a reason to believe in public television. The two-hour film from Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker should get an award simply for tackling the issue of social class. (Alvarez and Kolker are Peabody and Emmy Award winners for such critically celebrated works as Vote for Me: Politics in America and American Tongues.
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HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Roughly 13 minutes into a science experiment involving sets of blocks, Dorian Larkins, who at that moment is two weeks shy of his third birthday, has had enough. He would rather play with the trains in the waiting room, and he says he has to pee. But at his mother's urging, he soldiers on for another five minutes or so until the session, which looks at toddler memory, wraps up. His mom believes it's imperative that Dorian participate in the work of the Laboratory for Child Development at Johns Hopkins University - but less so for her son's sake than for the researcher's.
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NEWS
By TRB | August 1, 1991
Washington. -- It does not strike me as terminally hypocritical for Clarence Thomas to have enjoyed the fruits of reverse discrimination at every stage in his career -- including his nomination for the Supreme Court -- while claiming to be morally opposed. Unless you are Ghandi, you live in society as you find it while working for change. I oppose the home mortgage-interest deduction, but I still take it every year.What nicely complicates the anti-affirmative-action position, though, is the evident reasonableness of giving someone like Clarence Thomas a leg up in the game of life.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Each week The Sun's  John McIntyre  presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: PHATIC Language carries a good deal more than mere raw information. The way you speak and write gives indications of your origins, education, and social class. And some exchanges carry little or no raw information at all. Phatic (pronounced FAT-ik)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Each week The Sun's  John McIntyre  presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: PHATIC Language carries a good deal more than mere raw information. The way you speak and write gives indications of your origins, education, and social class. And some exchanges carry little or no raw information at all. Phatic (pronounced FAT-ik)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 12, 2000
"Young Americans," a new WB drama set at a boarding school full of pretty people, tells the very old stories of star-crossed lovers and a hero on his quest. The result: a series that not only looks good, but also has some dramatic meat on its bones. Maybe I'm just desperate for any kind of new drama in this summer of reality programs, but I think WB might have another "Dawson's Creek" in the making. "Young Americans" is pleasant to look at but doesn't make you feel stupid for looking. The heart of the series, which is filmed in and around Baltimore, belongs to Will Krudski, a "townie" from the fictional town of Rawley who wins a scholarship to the prestigious Rawley Academy, prep school for the future leaders of America.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 1, 2002
The Way We Live Now is a big, fat, Masterpiece Theatre, English melodrama full of ladies and lords, young men on the make and old ones in decline, weekends in the country, romantic misunderstandings and so much social class stratification and confusion that it almost makes you dizzy. The six-hour, four-part miniseries starring David Suchet is also highly addictive. And, while it's based on the 1875 novel by Anthony Trollope and set in Victorian England, The Way We Live Now could not be more of the moment and American.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 26, 2005
Who says prime-time television never deals with differences in social class? Consider this moment from the third season premiere of The Simple Life: Interns, as job skills-impaired Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie climb into overalls to start work at a Quality Auto Muffler Center in Bayonne, N.J.: "So, is this, like, blue collar or white collar?" Hilton asks, complaining about having to wear "polyester" without underwear. "This is blue," Richie says with a degree of certainty remarkable for her. "And, like, white is better?"
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Roughly 13 minutes into a science experiment involving sets of blocks, Dorian Larkins, who at that moment is two weeks shy of his third birthday, has had enough. He would rather play with the trains in the waiting room, and he says he has to pee. But at his mother's urging, he soldiers on for another five minutes or so until the session, which looks at toddler memory, wraps up. His mom believes it's imperative that Dorian participate in the work of the Laboratory for Child Development at Johns Hopkins University - but less so for her son's sake than for the researcher's.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 1, 1995
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Ronald Reagan is 84 and ailing; it seems likely that soon he will be gone. When that happens he will be widely mourned, for to many Americans middle-aged and younger he was the most popular and respected president of their lifetimes.Newsweek, recognizing this and wanting to stay ahead of the curve, has him on its cover this week, keyed to a rather saccharine and condescending piece by Eleanor Clift about the ''long-troubled'' Reagan family and how the former president's illness has brought its members back together.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 26, 2005
Who says prime-time television never deals with differences in social class? Consider this moment from the third season premiere of The Simple Life: Interns, as job skills-impaired Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie climb into overalls to start work at a Quality Auto Muffler Center in Bayonne, N.J.: "So, is this, like, blue collar or white collar?" Hilton asks, complaining about having to wear "polyester" without underwear. "This is blue," Richie says with a degree of certainty remarkable for her. "And, like, white is better?"
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2003
It took a third drunken-driving arrest - and a motorcycle crash that left him broken, battered and bruised in Maryland Shock Trauma Center - to convince Dan Daniels that it was finally time to clean up his act. "That's when I understood that, for me, drinking and driving was no joke," a matter-of-fact Daniels, 30, told about 60 teen-agers packed on the hard benches of Howard District Court yesterday. "I did it about 10 years, got away with it. It escalated." Now that he is clean, he has no intention of returning to his hard-drinking lifestyle, he said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 1, 2002
The Way We Live Now is a big, fat, Masterpiece Theatre, English melodrama full of ladies and lords, young men on the make and old ones in decline, weekends in the country, romantic misunderstandings and so much social class stratification and confusion that it almost makes you dizzy. The six-hour, four-part miniseries starring David Suchet is also highly addictive. And, while it's based on the 1875 novel by Anthony Trollope and set in Victorian England, The Way We Live Now could not be more of the moment and American.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 23, 2001
Start simple. That's the strategy Peabody Award-winning filmmakers Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker say they used to capture one of the most elusive concepts and least understood realities in our lives: social class in America. "That was our challenge: to figure out how you get Americans to confront an issue that a lot of people don't have anything to say about -- or, at least, think they don't have anything to say about," Alvarez said in a telephone interview last week. "At first, we didn't really know what to do at all. Then we said, 'Let's do the incredibly basic thing of cutting out some pictures from magazines, putting them on a black background, taking them out on the street and asking people about them.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 2001
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Are there social classes in America? In a new book, "The Classless Society," University of Virginia sociologist Paul Kingston forcefully answers no. Published by Stanford University Press, the book challenges a long-standing intellectual tradition of class analysis and calls for a new, more complex understanding of social divisions. Kingston, an associate professor of sociology, argues that members of presumed classes do not significantly share distinct, life-defining experiences and, therefore, cannot be viewed in any meaningful ways as classes, the way they might inform some other societies.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 12, 2000
"Young Americans," a new WB drama set at a boarding school full of pretty people, tells the very old stories of star-crossed lovers and a hero on his quest. The result: a series that not only looks good, but also has some dramatic meat on its bones. Maybe I'm just desperate for any kind of new drama in this summer of reality programs, but I think WB might have another "Dawson's Creek" in the making. "Young Americans" is pleasant to look at but doesn't make you feel stupid for looking. The heart of the series, which is filmed in and around Baltimore, belongs to Will Krudski, a "townie" from the fictional town of Rawley who wins a scholarship to the prestigious Rawley Academy, prep school for the future leaders of America.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,special to the sun | April 14, 1996
"The Woman Who Walked Into Doors," by Roddy Doyle. Viking Penguin. 226 pages. $22.95. Irish novelist Roddy Doyle has written another gorgeous novel. "The Woman Who Walked Into Doors" is both powerful fiction and a dirge, a lament as devastating as his Booker Prize-winning "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha" with its horrifying revelation of the full title: "Paddy Clarke - Has no da. Ha ha ha!" Paddy's dad abandons the family and Paula, Mr. Doyle's new heroine, is beaten senseless for 17 years by Charlo, her brutal husband, before this novel's own startling conclusion.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 8, 1999
The producers of Mobil Masterpiece Theatre say they took a "dark, deep psychological approach" to Dickens in their version of "Great Expectations," which starts tomorrow night on PBS.And the moment Miss Havisham opens her mouth to tell young Pip, "I have sick fancies, Pip," you know you are sailing down Psycho River, heading straight for Freudian Falls, pulled by a narrative undertow impossible to resist. Nobody does "sick fancies" like the Brits.This is Dickens you could drown in and love every wet and wild minute of it. I am not a great fan of Dickens, but I love this rich, daring, psychologically charged interpretation.
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