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July 29, 1991
Who: Kenneth Montague Jr.Age: 48From: BaltimoreAssignment: Lesotho, 1967-71Was recruited to teach English. On arrival was assigned to teach high-school-level physics, chemistry and biology.Update: Trial lawyer and, since 1987, member of Maryland House of Delegates, representing District 44."The age of the students varied because most of them had to pay to go to school. Some were in their 20s and 30s and had been working in the mines for years to save up enough money to go to school."". . . As a volunteer you were able to use the full range of experience you had in this country.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
It took decades before serious documentaries about the civil rights struggle of the 1960s began to appear. But less than a year after some of the biggest victories in the fight for same-sex marriage, a social movement often compared to civil rights, compelling nonfiction films chronicling that history are already starting to arrive. I'm not certain whether such near-instant history will prove to be a good or bad thing, but it's sure to shape the way the fight for marriage equality and gay rights is perceived in future battlegrounds and by future generations.
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NEWS
By James Giza and James Giza,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
A task force of eight young leaders from around the world launched a Web site in Baltimore yesterday geared toward helping youths effect positive social change. The site - youthactionnet.org - was launched at the International Youth Foundation building downtown. The task force worked the past five days setting goals for its development. Task force members will jointly maintain the Web site from their respective countries - the United States, Germany, Brazil, Nepal, Zambia, Jamaica, China and the Philippines - offering such resources as tips on writing proposals and a list of youth organizations.
NEWS
April 23, 2012
Central Maryland has a lot to celebrate. This past week, hundreds of nonprofits across the region joined their voices to say "thank you" to the thousands of volunteers who selflessly give their time, effort and expertise each day as part of National Volunteer Week. From providing board of directors leadership and office support to painting, serving lunch, tutoring, harvesting produce and much more, volunteers of any age are invaluable to the nonprofits they serve, and they share something truly special with our vulnerable neighbors by listening and showing they care.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 17, 2007
Julian Bond ought to have a word with Don Imus: "Thanks." Mr. Bond, the national board chairman of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said as much when he alluded to the embattled radio showman during opening ceremonies of the 98-year-old organization's annual convention last week. "While we are happy to have sent a certain radio cowboy back to his ranch, we ought to hold ourselves to the same standard," Mr. Bond said to enthusiastic applause.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
Sam Lacy, sports editor of the Baltimore Afro-American, yesterday received the Frederick Douglass Award from the University System of Maryland, amid observations that the lives of the two civil rights activists nearly overlapped.Lacy, 94, was born eight years after Douglass' death. Better he follow in Douglass' footsteps, Lacy said of the 19th century abolitionist and editor."Frederick Douglass laid the groundwork for my work in journalism," Lacy said at a luncheon in his honor at Oriole Park.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1999
In the 1960s, Walter P. Carter went freedom riding along U.S. 40 to desegregate restaurants and before his premature death in 1971, had succeeded in becoming one of Baltimore's leading civil rights leaders during the turbulent 1960s.Carter's activism was no doubt aroused by the marchings and cross burnings of the Ku Klux Klan which he witnessed as a child growing up in Monroe, N.C., whose population of 6,000 included 2,000 blacks.During World War II, while serving as an Army clerk in Europe, he narrowly escaped death when an enemy bomb exploded a nearby ammunition dump.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
On a steamy afternoon this month, 30 ACORN members rode a school bus to a South Baltimore park where they joined members of other groups in a demonstration against Wal-Mart. Sonja Merchant-Jones, co-chairwoman of the state chapter of ACORN, gave a speech accusing the corporate giant of exploiting workers by failing to provide adequate health care benefits. After skewering Wal-Mart, Jones finished her speech with a plug for ACORN: "If you want to make a difference, join ACORN." The Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now boasts of being the nation's largest antipoverty group with chapters in more than 100 cities and 37 states and a membership of about 200,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel J. Kornstein and Daniel J. Kornstein,Special to the Sun | August 13, 2000
"Lawyers as Agents of Social Change" was the controversial subject of a spirited panel session at the annual meeting in July of the American Bar Association in New York City. The topic sends sparks flying and sharply divides lawyers, often depending on the clients they represent. But the issue is too important -- far too important in a democracy like ours, far too pressing, more urgently now than ever before -- to leave to the lawyers. It is past time for lawyer and non-lawyer alike to think good and hard about the power of private, unelected lawyers to spearhead social change.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2003
Michelle Yvette Khoury, a receptionist who enjoyed travel, died of heart disease Saturday at her Towson home. She was 30. Miss Khoury was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson, and was a 1991 graduate of Towson High School. Though she was born with a congenital heart defect, Miss Khoury was determined to make her own way in the world. "Even though she had special needs, she was a very, very special person. She was totally unselfish," said her mother, Gloria H. Khoury of Towson. After graduating from high school, she joined The Chimes Inc., a nonprofit group that provides services to mentally disabled adults and children, as a receptionist.
NEWS
October 6, 2011
While The Sun has covered the young people camping at the Inner Harbor in the Occupy Baltimore demonstrations ("' Occupy' protests spread to Baltimore ," Oct. 4), it has missed the adults who have been meeting on this issue for weeks and who are already planning large demonstrations in Washington on Oct. 6 and Oct. 15. The Pledge of Resistance was formed for individuals willing to engage in nonviolent civil resistance to first prevent and later to protest the war in Iraq. It is affiliated with several national peace groups, including the National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance and United For Peace & Justice.
NEWS
February 13, 2009
A century's worth of struggle, action and reward should be acknowledged and praised. The NAACP's centennial is a reason to celebrate the past and to lay the groundwork for the next phase of America's oldest civil rights organization. The inequities that led to the group's founding have been resolved through legal challenges and the hard work of its members. But not all is equal in today's America. A lack of opportunity persists for many African-Americans, and the disparities prevalent in America's public schools attest to the need for a vibrant and vital NAACP.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2009
I'm a theater-weeper. I'm probably not going to break down during Shrek the Musical or Avenue Q. Though to be truthful, my eyes might fill up during a love song in Wicked, and I might have to blink rapidly when Mufasa dies in The Lion King. But if you're seated next to me and we're watching a musical with a compelling story told by sublime singers who are also fine actors, hand me a tissue, please. Recently I saw such a musical at Center Stage in Baltimore. In fact, I saw it twice: My husband and I went on opening night and resolved to bring our children when they arrived home from college on winter break.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 17, 2007
Julian Bond ought to have a word with Don Imus: "Thanks." Mr. Bond, the national board chairman of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said as much when he alluded to the embattled radio showman during opening ceremonies of the 98-year-old organization's annual convention last week. "While we are happy to have sent a certain radio cowboy back to his ranch, we ought to hold ourselves to the same standard," Mr. Bond said to enthusiastic applause.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | March 11, 2007
Tucked between storefronts in the middle of Towson, a glass door marked "Odd Fellows Temple, Towson Lodge No. 79" leads to a narrow staircase. At the top, a heavy door with a peephole opens to a hall where throne-like chairs face an altar. In a back room, a skeleton lies in a casket. Generations have met in this stone building to plan good works or hold mystic ceremonies. They were brothers in a secret society, founded in the Old World but, in America, first chartered in Baltimore.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
On a steamy afternoon this month, 30 ACORN members rode a school bus to a South Baltimore park where they joined members of other groups in a demonstration against Wal-Mart. Sonja Merchant-Jones, co-chairwoman of the state chapter of ACORN, gave a speech accusing the corporate giant of exploiting workers by failing to provide adequate health care benefits. After skewering Wal-Mart, Jones finished her speech with a plug for ACORN: "If you want to make a difference, join ACORN." The Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now boasts of being the nation's largest antipoverty group with chapters in more than 100 cities and 37 states and a membership of about 200,000.
NEWS
April 23, 2012
Central Maryland has a lot to celebrate. This past week, hundreds of nonprofits across the region joined their voices to say "thank you" to the thousands of volunteers who selflessly give their time, effort and expertise each day as part of National Volunteer Week. From providing board of directors leadership and office support to painting, serving lunch, tutoring, harvesting produce and much more, volunteers of any age are invaluable to the nonprofits they serve, and they share something truly special with our vulnerable neighbors by listening and showing they care.
NEWS
March 18, 1997
THE ODENTON-FORT MEADE area of western Anne Arundel County is changing rapidly enough that you never know what you will find there.For example, the number of pleasant Asian eateries keeps increasing on the old "Boomtown" stretch along Route 175.Odenton has also become home in the past year to one of the biggest antiques malls around -- though the old Jamesway department store at Ridgeview Plaza may not be quite as large as the restored Savage Mill in...
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
It was a long drive from Atlanta to Baltimore for Morning Strickland and Keith Mercer. There was that awkward moment in a Waffle House in North Carolina when local residents eyed Strickland's traffic cone-colored orange Mohawk. But the folks at Red Emma's bookstore in Mount Vernon had plenty of coffee and vegetarian food on hand to welcome the pair, who came up for this weekend's Mid-Atlantic Radical Bookfair. Strickland and Mercer joined hundreds of activists from around the country for three days of workshops and discussions on such diverse topics as U.S. foreign policy and the prison system.
NEWS
By PETER STEINHART | September 30, 2005
It's the opening in London tomorrow of the Big Draw, a month-long series of events calculated to get Britons to come out and exercise their eyes. The Big Draw is a memorial of sorts to John Ruskin, the Victorian writer who drew every day and urged others to draw so that they might see clearly and deeply into things. On opening day last year, 35,000 sketched in Trafalgar Square. About 200,000 showed up for events around the kingdom Oct. 15, Big Draw Day. They drew Tudor hats at Queen Elizabeth's hunting lodge and naval heroes at the Royal Naval College.
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