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Social Anxiety

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By Mary Maushard | January 21, 1992
Child's social anxiety should be expressedSOCIAL ANXIETY is normal among children, and young people who deny feeling queasy at a school dance or shy at a family gathering are probably heading for more trouble than their peers who feel -- and acknowledge -- some anxiety. "Subjects who denied social difficulties portrayed themselves as more comfortable around others and happy with interpersonal contact. But they also exhibited a higher level of psychological problems," says Lee Keyes, a psychologist who studied more than 900 youths ages 8 to 19. In his study at Texas A & M University, Mr. Keyes found no relation between age or sex and social anxiety.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | September 27, 2012
Previously, the tribes were dotted with past contestants and minor celebrities, and I somehow managed to mix up Brandon and Colton from "Survivor: One World. " How I managed to mix up Brandon and his Crazy with Colton, I don't know (but thank you to Todd Mallett for pointing that out to me in the comments!) Zane thought he was being all sneaky-like and good with the strategerizing when it totally wasn't necessary, and ended up going home. Back from Tribal Council, Russell is dealing with the feeling of actually having been on the chopping block.
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NEWS
By Jim Sollisch | October 27, 2000
CLEVELAND -- When I was growing up in the '60s and '70s, drugs were something kids did, parents worried about and politicians railed against. What a quaint and simple time. Today, your kid's more likely to be using Ritalin than marijuana. There's a good chance Bob Dole turned your father on to Viagra. Olympic athletes were disqualified for using cold medicine. And the presidential candidate who figures out how best to help grandma pay for her prescription drugs may win the election. And we better hope one of them figures out a permanent solution because by the time we boomers are seniors, we'll be doing more drugs than anyone could have imagined back in the '60s.
NEWS
By Alex Pavlovic, San Jose Mercury News | April 26, 2012
The San Francisco Giants placed former Oriole Aubrey Huff on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday, two days after he left the team because of an episode of anxiety. Huff has been getting treatment in Florida and is expected to rejoin the team Friday in San Francisco, where he will continue to get help. Manager Bruce Bochy spoke with Huff on Wednesday afternoon after days of exchanging text messages. Asked whether Huff's anxiety was related to personal or baseball problems, Bochy said: "I don't know if he even knows.
NEWS
By Alex Pavlovic, San Jose Mercury News | April 26, 2012
The San Francisco Giants placed former Oriole Aubrey Huff on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday, two days after he left the team because of an episode of anxiety. Huff has been getting treatment in Florida and is expected to rejoin the team Friday in San Francisco, where he will continue to get help. Manager Bruce Bochy spoke with Huff on Wednesday afternoon after days of exchanging text messages. Asked whether Huff's anxiety was related to personal or baseball problems, Bochy said: "I don't know if he even knows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | December 18, 2011
So, who's still pissed off? We start out with Sophie still reeling from the fact that she's won $1 million. Jeff asks her about how she came across in the game, and she comes up with the awesome answer that she's decided to be more like Dawn. Again, I haven't watched Coach's previous seasons, but I found him tolerable, if a bit arrogant. If this season was him toning down the arrogance, I can see why people didn't like him. And Jeff brings up the huge amount of praying that was done this season, and yes, Coach, it does seem a bit trite.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | September 27, 2012
Previously, the tribes were dotted with past contestants and minor celebrities, and I somehow managed to mix up Brandon and Colton from "Survivor: One World. " How I managed to mix up Brandon and his Crazy with Colton, I don't know (but thank you to Todd Mallett for pointing that out to me in the comments!) Zane thought he was being all sneaky-like and good with the strategerizing when it totally wasn't necessary, and ended up going home. Back from Tribal Council, Russell is dealing with the feeling of actually having been on the chopping block.
NEWS
By Meredith Moss and Meredith Moss,Cox News Service | April 23, 2000
He understands how it feels. "I was a shy adolescent and had almost no dates in high school," says Bernardo J. Carducci, now a professor of psychology at Indiana University Southeast in New Albany. "I couldn't talk to girls." These days, Carducci, 47, is talking to all kinds of people, especially to those who find shyness a stumbling block in their daily lives. He's convinced he can help. As director of the Shyness Research Institute at his university, Carducci has interviewed thousands of shy people over the past 25 years.
NEWS
By Joe Capista and Joe Capista,contributing writer | May 16, 1999
What if the thought of conversation made you sick with fear? Or you lost a job because you were frightened of interacting with others? According to a study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association last year, this describes the lives of more than 10 million Americans who suffer from social anxiety disorder. Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is a biological brain disorder that causes people to dread and avoid everyday social situations.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2007
It certainly was not the spot Sam Perlozzo wanted for Kurt Birkins, but with all his other options in the bullpen exhausted at that point, the Orioles' manager had no choice. So, in a scoreless game in the 12th inning last night, Perlozzo summoned Birkins, who had not pitched to live hitters since an appearance in extended spring training March 30. The left-hander was one out away from escaping the inning unscathed before he threw a changeup to Detroit Tigers left fielder Craig Monroe that caught way too much of the plate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen | December 18, 2011
So, who's still pissed off? We start out with Sophie still reeling from the fact that she's won $1 million. Jeff asks her about how she came across in the game, and she comes up with the awesome answer that she's decided to be more like Dawn. Again, I haven't watched Coach's previous seasons, but I found him tolerable, if a bit arrogant. If this season was him toning down the arrogance, I can see why people didn't like him. And Jeff brings up the huge amount of praying that was done this season, and yes, Coach, it does seem a bit trite.
NEWS
By Jim Sollisch | October 27, 2000
CLEVELAND -- When I was growing up in the '60s and '70s, drugs were something kids did, parents worried about and politicians railed against. What a quaint and simple time. Today, your kid's more likely to be using Ritalin than marijuana. There's a good chance Bob Dole turned your father on to Viagra. Olympic athletes were disqualified for using cold medicine. And the presidential candidate who figures out how best to help grandma pay for her prescription drugs may win the election. And we better hope one of them figures out a permanent solution because by the time we boomers are seniors, we'll be doing more drugs than anyone could have imagined back in the '60s.
NEWS
By Meredith Moss and Meredith Moss,Cox News Service | April 23, 2000
He understands how it feels. "I was a shy adolescent and had almost no dates in high school," says Bernardo J. Carducci, now a professor of psychology at Indiana University Southeast in New Albany. "I couldn't talk to girls." These days, Carducci, 47, is talking to all kinds of people, especially to those who find shyness a stumbling block in their daily lives. He's convinced he can help. As director of the Shyness Research Institute at his university, Carducci has interviewed thousands of shy people over the past 25 years.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | January 21, 1992
Child's social anxiety should be expressedSOCIAL ANXIETY is normal among children, and young people who deny feeling queasy at a school dance or shy at a family gathering are probably heading for more trouble than their peers who feel -- and acknowledge -- some anxiety. "Subjects who denied social difficulties portrayed themselves as more comfortable around others and happy with interpersonal contact. But they also exhibited a higher level of psychological problems," says Lee Keyes, a psychologist who studied more than 900 youths ages 8 to 19. In his study at Texas A & M University, Mr. Keyes found no relation between age or sex and social anxiety.
NEWS
By Jim Sollisch | June 4, 2002
CLEVELAND - About five years ago, we noticed something strange on TV: commercials asking us to ask our doctors about amazing new drugs. All of a sudden, we all had allergies, and Claritin could help. Millions of American men admitted that they weren't as potent as they had hoped. Viagra sales soared. New syndromes were created: One recent commercial states that up to 17 percent of us suffer from social anxiety disorder. Not surprisingly, there's a drug for this. Pharmaceutical companies had discovered the power of advertising.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | October 17, 1999
Q. More than 20 years ago, I was diagnosed with agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder. After nine years of therapy, six psychologists and several ineffective prescriptions, I was given Ativan. This drug was a miracle for me. I experienced absolutely no side effects, and taking it made a difference like day and night.I was told from the beginning that Ativan is addictive, so I have been careful not to take more than the recommended dose. I've never taken it for more than seven days in a row, and it has allowed me to live an almost normal life.
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