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NEWS
January 30, 2014
Both the International Olympic Committee and Russian President Vladimir Putin erred in placing the Winter Olympics in Russia and specifically in Sochi, for the IOC granting the games to Russia and for Putin choosing Sochi, so close to the regions where terrorist attacks have occurred ("Terrorists threaten to crash Putin's party," Jan. 28). While the ideals of the Olympics have been international cooperation and brotherhood linked with tolerance, the heads of the IOC have not represented these lofty principles.
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SPORTS
March 28, 2014
Baltimore's Becca Meyers and Ian Silverman set world records on the opening day of the 2014 U.S. Paralympics Swimming Spring National Championships/Spring CanAms on Thursday at Miami's Ransom Everglades School. The event, which runs through Saturday, serves as the U.S. team qualifier for the Pan Pacific Para-Swimming Championships in August. Meyers, a Loyola Maryland student from Timonium, who competes in the S13 classification, won the women's 1500-meter freestyle in 17 minutes, 53.90 seconds in the morning session to smash the world record.
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NEWS
By Mark Nuckols | February 6, 2014
During the past seven years, Russia has spent over $50 billion to produce what President Vladimir Putin promises will be the best winter Olympics ever. It has been estimated that as much as half or more of this money has been stolen or wasted. Also overshadowing the games, which kick off Friday in Sochi with the opening ceremony, have been various credible threats of terrorist attacks. For these and other reasons, Sochi may turn out to be a national humiliation for Russia and a political disaster for Mr. Putin himself.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
You start with a little girl, dropped in an orphanage and afflicted with a spinal condition that has paralyzed her below the belly button. She's cared for, yes, but none of the well-meaning adults look at this child, scooting around the facility on her hands, and imagine a future ripe with possibility. How do you get from there to a 24-year-old woman nicknamed "The Beast," a fearsomely muscled athlete who believes her body can fulfill the most outlandish ambitions her mind concocts?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 15, 2014
What are the lessons from the flap over Under Armour's Mach 39 speed skater suit and its supposed connection to the U.S. team's poor early showing at the Winter Olympics? Walk with me, let's talk. If you follow flaps — and who doesn't? — you know that some American speed skaters suggested that the new super-suits were not so super. In fact, some thought the suits were a real drag. The Mach 39 has an oval-shaped mesh vent on the back to relieve skaters of body heat, and that appears to be why, late last week, there was a lot of sturm und drang from Sochi.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | February 10, 2014
A lot of attention has been paid to the lead up to the opening of the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia this week. While there was a lot of anticipation for fans to watch the games themselves (I'm fond of curling myself) folks here in Maryland need to consider a different side to Sochi. A lot has been made about the problems with Olympic facilities in the greater Sochi region. Some of them have been outright hilarious , some have been outright nasty , some odd , some have been dangerous and all of them have been accurate .  All of those things could have a future impact here in Maryland.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
You start with a little girl, dropped in an orphanage and afflicted with a spinal condition that has paralyzed her below the belly button. She's cared for, yes, but none of the well-meaning adults look at this child, scooting around the facility on her hands, and imagine a future ripe with possibility. How do you get from there to a 24-year-old woman nicknamed "The Beast," a fearsomely muscled athlete who believes her body can fulfill the most outlandish ambitions her mind concocts?
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
When the winter Olympics gets underway next month in Sochi, Russia, Under Armour's logo will be seen by millions of viewers around the globe as the Baltimore-based brand sponsors two U.S. teams and another from Canada. The Olympic sponsorships - the greatest exposure yet for Under Armour at any winter games - could pay off not only in brand awareness, but in stronger sales and profits, company officials say. They hope wins by sponsored athletes or even just the exposure will reinforce the company's mantra of "making all athletes better" in consumers' minds.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
John Bernstein never had trouble keeping track of what sport his daughter was competing in or the team on which she was playing. Ida Bernstein can't make the same claim for what she jokingly calls her "athletically confused career. " Ever since she graduated from Dulaney High more than a decade ago and was recruited to play soccer and run track at Syracuse, Bernstein's life on and off the field has been something of a blur. It seems fitting, since one of the objectives for the now 28-year-old Bernstein is moving quite fast in her current passions - bobsled and rugby.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
She hails from a family of Baltimore firefighters, but Summer Britcher's life runs counter. She battles the ice. One of the youngest members of the Olympic luge team, Britcher, 19, is competing in her first Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Opening ceremonies are Friday and come Monday she'll lay on her back and rattle her sled down a frozen track with 17 banked turns for nearly one mile at speeds exceeding 80 miles an hour. Sans brakes. "It's terrifying, but I'm hooked," Britcher said.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | February 24, 2014
  The Blast (16-3) blew out the host Rochester Lancers, 22-5, for its eighth consecutive win in Major Indoor Soccer League play. The Blast (16-3) led 12-0 at halftime after 3-pointers by Mike Lookingland (Loyola High) and Lucio Gonzaga , and two points each from Marco Mangione and J.T. Noone . The Lancers responded with a 3-pointer in the third quarter but allowed eight Blast points, entering the final quarter with a 20-3 deficit. Blast goalkeeper Troy Hernandez had 13 saves.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Vladimir Luxuria, Europe's first openly transgender parliamentarian, was reportedly detained twice in Sochi this week for supporting LGBT rights at the Winter Olympics. Luxuria, a former Communist member of parliament in Italy, was stopped by four men after donning rainbow-colored garb and yelling "It's OK to be gay" outside the Olympic hockey stadium, according to the Associated Press .  The men reportedly escorted her to a car, stripped her of her Olympics pass and dropped her off in the Russian countryside.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 15, 2014
What are the lessons from the flap over Under Armour's Mach 39 speed skater suit and its supposed connection to the U.S. team's poor early showing at the Winter Olympics? Walk with me, let's talk. If you follow flaps — and who doesn't? — you know that some American speed skaters suggested that the new super-suits were not so super. In fact, some thought the suits were a real drag. The Mach 39 has an oval-shaped mesh vent on the back to relieve skaters of body heat, and that appears to be why, late last week, there was a lot of sturm und drang from Sochi.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Jared S. Hopkins, Tribune Newspapers | February 14, 2014
U.S. speedskaters will resume competition Saturday in an older racing suit from Baltimore-based Under Armour, hanging up the company's high-tech Mach 39 suit introduced for the Winter Olympics in Sochi. Some skaters worried the new suit might be hurting their performance. Kevin Haley, Under Armour's senior vice president for innovation, said an Under Armour design team was in Russia, tweaking the older suits, which skaters wore during World Cup competition, to meet International Skating Union standards for use in Sochi.
NEWS
February 11, 2014
If prejudice masquerading as journalism were an Olympic sport, the vile diatribe of commentator Mark Nuckols against all things Russian would win gold hands down ( "The Sochi experiment," Feb. 6). The real problem, however, is that Mr. Nuckols' rant is just a small part of a much larger propaganda blast aimed at ginning up worse-than-Cold-War relations between Russia and the West, with potentially catastrophic strategic consequences for the planet. Give Mr. Nuckols credit for a certain perverse originality.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | February 10, 2014
A lot of attention has been paid to the lead up to the opening of the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia this week. While there was a lot of anticipation for fans to watch the games themselves (I'm fond of curling myself) folks here in Maryland need to consider a different side to Sochi. A lot has been made about the problems with Olympic facilities in the greater Sochi region. Some of them have been outright hilarious , some have been outright nasty , some odd , some have been dangerous and all of them have been accurate .  All of those things could have a future impact here in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
An albino hedgehog sits on someone's palm at the Botanical Garden in the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi. The hedgehog was found at one of the construction sites of the 2014 Winter Olympics.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun foreign reporter | June 18, 2007
SOCHI, Russia -- The two-lane road from the old Soviet-style airport to the center of town has become an avenue of billboards showing men, women and children on skis and snowboards, riding chairlifts and chasing hockey pucks. On their faces is the promise of what might come to be in this city in southern Russia, and something Russians have historically had little experience with: hope. Dubbed the "Russian Riviera" - which, granted, is a bit of an embellishment - Sochi has palm trees and parasailing and a shoreline stretching dozens of miles along the temperate Black Sea coast.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 7, 2014
Women will compete in the ski jump for the first time ever in the Winter Olympics Tuesday. Don't blink, you might miss it. While the men will compete on both hills and in team competition this week, the women will take only one day to jump from the smaller hill. But it is a big leap for womankind, the culmination of a long legal battle. Though men have competed in ski jumping since the first Winter Games in 1924, and though women are allowed to compete in bobsled, luge and ice hockey, the International Olympic Committee had refused to let women ski jump in the games until now. Why?
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Maryland first lady Catherine Curran O'Malley sits down to watch the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, she'll feel a little uneasy. Like many Marylanders and others around the world, the start of the games has left O'Malley wondering what more can be done for Russia's gay community, and what watching the games means. They wonder whether watching condones Russia's anti-gay record. Conversely, is not watching a protest? What can people do to support the athletes? O'Malley, who has spent time in Russia and admires its culture and people, will watch - but not without reflection.
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