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NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Kate Linthicum and Alexandra Zavis and Kate Linthicum,Los Angeles Times | January 4, 2009
About 220 Little Leagues and other sports organizations in the United States face losses after an online payment company stopped handing over dues and other funds that it was collecting. The missing payments, which Washington state-based Count Me In Corp. acknowledged Tuesday total $5 million, have left many of the organizations wondering how they will make up the difference. "I've lost sleep over this," said Jeff Bacon, treasurer of the Encino Little League in Los Angeles, which is owed $100,000 in membership fees.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun Reporter | February 28, 2008
The Maryland Stadium Authority ordered a $70,000 study yesterday to determine whether Prince George's County would be a suitable home for the D.C. United soccer club. The study by Crossroads Consulting will examine the county's potential as a soccer market and the potential tax and economic development benefits of attracting the Major League Soccer team. It will not focus on specific stadium sites. Those would have to be vetted later, though the club has shown interest over the years in several locations near College Park.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
IF YOU'RE anything of an old-line soccer fan, chances are that contrived, summertime promotions such as the 2005 McDonald's McSoccerfest conducted in Howard County this past weekend make you want to grind your teeth. You know, international merchandiser of high-cal fast food to kids of all ages throws around some money and gets its name printed and broadcast for free, riding the wave of popularity that continues in youth soccer. But this kind of event -- last year it was the Got Milk?
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2005
THIS IS about "the U.S. over-30 women's national team." That's a soccer team with five players who reside in Howard County. Their coach is widely known in Howard County, coaches for the western Howard County Thunder youth club, in fact. And virtually all of the players, regardless of where they live, play soccer indoors and outdoors year-round in Howard County. "Whaaaaat?" you soccer buffs surely are thinking. "What over-30 women's national team? There is no such thing." Correct. But don't tell the spokesman for a soccer club in a small German town visited a year ago by Vintage United, a team that sometimes calls itself Vintage Lightning.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2005
SOME OF the stuff people in the Howard County amateur sports scene are talking about as spring seasons blur into summertime: HCYP: The growing, four-sport Howard County Youth Program, centered in Ellicott City, is getting its first office. The office is small, about 10 by 12, but has been needed for years, and its location makes sense for anyone who has been involved with this active club. The new space is at Kiwanis-Wallas Park, on Route 144 just off U.S. 40 in western Ellicott City, where the club has its primary baseball and softball fields.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | November 14, 2004
IRONIC, IN a way, this thing about a shortage of fields in Howard County. Just ask the Thunder Soccer Club, which despite a morning delay yesterday because of soggy fields, is conducting its season-ending Fall Bash tournament for boys this weekend and for girls next weekend, drawing 135 teams from as far as New York and Ohio. "We're a western Howard County club, but most of our games are being played in the eastern part of the county," said Scott Maurer, who with Kim Clapp chairs the growing travel club's event.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | June 6, 2004
THE AFTERGLOW of last weekend's debut of the Soccer Association of Columbia-Howard County's new Covenant Park fields took a significant financial twist the day after tournament play ended. Dave Procida, the club's president, announced that directors had approved on Tuesday night the largest sponsorship in club history. Creig Northrop & The Northrop Team, a Clarksville-based real estate business, will pay $375,000 over seven years for participation in Covenant Park, Procida said. In exchange, the club will alter the name of the complex, with the entrance sign on Centennial Lane to read "Northrop Fields at Covenant Park."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2004
When Franklin High School soccer coach Ian Reid plays soccer around the house with his 4-year-old son, Alex, and his wife yells, Reid has flashbacks. "I don't exactly remember when I started playing, but when that happens, I remember the same thing happening to me when I was a boy," said Reid, one of six men who will be inducted into the Maryland Soccer Hall of Fame tomorrow night. "My family moved here when I was 12, and my dad, a Scot, was a huge soccer fan. He loved the game, loved to play and always told great stories."
NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2004
The Greater Harford Soccer Club, in conjunction with its newly acquired adviser, Colone Associates of Oneonta, N.Y., is working to create the largest soccer complex in the county, which will include 11 to 15 high-quality fields for the use of professional teams and tournaments, organizers say. The Greater Harford Soccer Park, to be completed in 2007, will cover about 86 acres in two parcels in the Aberdeen area - about 30 acres on Beards Hill Road and...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2003
J. Eugene Ringsdorf Sr., a former president of the United States Soccer Federation who was inducted into its hall of fame, died of heart failure Thursday at Oak Crest Village retirement community in Parkville. He was 91. Mr. Ringsdorf was born in Baltimore and raised near Collington and North avenues. He attended night school at Polytechnic Institute and earned his high school diploma. He also took additional business courses at City College. In 1929, he began working the Rowan Comptroller Co. and eventually became the company's purchasing agent.
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