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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2003
The Baltimore area's eastern expansion continues. That's Far East when we're talking restaurants. Suzie's Soba, the Asian noodle house and Hampden hangout, is expecting the birth of a sister restaurant. Owner Suzie Hong says Monday is the planned opening date for the new Suzie's Soba in the Munsey Building, 7 N. Calvert St. At first, Hong says, the new downtown place will be open just for breakfast and lunch. Dinner hours will come later. Breakfast items include berries with yogurt, French toast and blueberry pancakes ($5.50 each)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [SHANISE WINTERS] | April 19, 2007
What's the point? -- This colorful site gives you all the techniques, tips and recipes you need to prepare a dish that's light on your wallet and heavy on taste. What to look for --For under $3 you can go international with Chicken of the Sea Clam Spaghetti, Cheesy Quesadillas or Quick French Toast. Those a bit more daring can try a Frito pie - a less traditional version of a casserole - or Buckwheat Soba Noodles. Bloggers share photos, offer advice and post comments on everything from appetizers to great grocery picks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By KATHRYN HIGHAM and KATHRYN HIGHAM,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1998
Sue Hi Hong, known about town as Suzie, is a little bit superstitious. So she took it as a sign when she found an ornamental gong that was a perfect fit for a restaurant space she was considering in Hampden. The location, Hong knew, was just right for Suzie's Soba.You might recognize that name from Hong's restaurant in the Belvedere. Since business there is slow in the evening, Hong had been searching for a site at which to open a dinner-only restaurant, one that was small enough for her to handle the cooking.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 23, 2004
Main-dish salads, especially those that work hot or cold, add flexibility to a cook's schedule. If you have time, you could make this dish before work and have it waiting when you return home. This recipe uses Japanese soba noodles, made of buckwheat and wheat, which add heft to an entree salad. These are sold in many supermarkets, as well as ethnic and specialty stores. (However, spaghetti noodles will work just fine.) Likewise, if you can't find hoisin sauce, 4 tablespoons of soy sauce can be used in place of the hoisin/soy combination.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 6, 2002
Suzie's Soba, a graceful little Asian restaurant in Hampden, has never quite gotten the attention it deserves. Baltimore has other fine Japanese and Korean eating places, but none with the quirky charm of the noodle shop owned by Sue Hi (otherwise known as Suzie) Hong. It's a deliciously funky space, starting with the cheerful neon lips slurping neon soba noodles out front. Inside, you walk past a decorative open kitchen to get to the closely spaced tables that line both side walls in back.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2003
The old Munsey building on Calvert Street, once the home of the Equitable Trust Company, recently celebrated the grand opening of its new life as an 18-story high-end apartment building. On the ground floor are three restaurants: Suzie's Soba to the right, and Roly Poly and Coffee Coffee, which share a space, to the left. Suzie's Soba, which has another restaurant by the same name in Hampden, is the class act of the bunch, serving lively Korean fare in a stylish setting. Roly Poly and Coffee Coffee are far more prosaic, providing sandwiches, baked goods and hot beverages to the downtown breakfast and lunch crowd.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 12, 1998
Noodles. They're everywhere in Japan. Green noodles, white noodles, thick noodles, thin noodles. The Japanese inhale them like french fries.Rice and sushi are the more well-known staples of the Japanese diets, but if you're on the run, noodles are the way to go.Soba noodles, made from soba flour, are so popular that some Japanese eat them three times a day. They're often served in a broth with all other kinds of goodies - spinach, tempura shrimp, you name...
FEATURES
By Kenneth Wapner and Kenneth Wapner,United Feature Syndicate | April 27, 1994
While most people think of Japan as a land of rice, the Japanese are, in fact, great noodle eaters. There is a noodle shop around every corner in every village and city from Okinawa to Hokkaido. When I lived in Japan, I loved the "Tampopo"-like noodle shops with their rattling doors, rickety stools and round counter-tops. I can still smell the sweet-salty steam rising from the roiling vats of stock made from soy, bonito and kelp. In Japan, the type of noodles one eats depends on the region.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SHANISE WINTERS] | April 19, 2007
What's the point? -- This colorful site gives you all the techniques, tips and recipes you need to prepare a dish that's light on your wallet and heavy on taste. What to look for --For under $3 you can go international with Chicken of the Sea Clam Spaghetti, Cheesy Quesadillas or Quick French Toast. Those a bit more daring can try a Frito pie - a less traditional version of a casserole - or Buckwheat Soba Noodles. Bloggers share photos, offer advice and post comments on everything from appetizers to great grocery picks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | May 2, 1996
What do you do if you have a coffee shop buried deep in an apartment building that gets no walk-by traffic? You can do what Suzie Hong did and turn it into something so trendy people are willing to hunt for it.Thus the Cozy Corner in the lower level of the Belvedere has become Suzie's Soba.Soba, in case you aren't up on your Asian noodles, is a Japanese noodle made from buckwheat flour. And shops that specialize in Asian noodle dishes are hot, hot, hot.Ms. Hong put a neat little sandwich board outside on North Charles Street to lure people in, and added a snazzy neon sign -- lips with noodles dangling out of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2003
The old Munsey building on Calvert Street, once the home of the Equitable Trust Company, recently celebrated the grand opening of its new life as an 18-story high-end apartment building. On the ground floor are three restaurants: Suzie's Soba to the right, and Roly Poly and Coffee Coffee, which share a space, to the left. Suzie's Soba, which has another restaurant by the same name in Hampden, is the class act of the bunch, serving lively Korean fare in a stylish setting. Roly Poly and Coffee Coffee are far more prosaic, providing sandwiches, baked goods and hot beverages to the downtown breakfast and lunch crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2003
For area restaurant listings and more reviews or to search for recipes, go to www.SunSpot.net/eatsFunky, charming, delicious Suzie's Soba, a Hampden culinary destination for the past five years, has opened a second location in the historic Munsey Building on Calvert Street. The building, now being converted to high-end apartments, housed the Equitable Trust Co. for more than 80 years. Suzie's kitchen is where the tellers used to be, and the spacious dining area still purrs with the tony ambience of a high-end bank, now Suzie-fied with funky touches like origami fish that seem to float among the bubble-themed artwork, and light fixtures decorated with glass beads and silk flowers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2003
The Baltimore area's eastern expansion continues. That's Far East when we're talking restaurants. Suzie's Soba, the Asian noodle house and Hampden hangout, is expecting the birth of a sister restaurant. Owner Suzie Hong says Monday is the planned opening date for the new Suzie's Soba in the Munsey Building, 7 N. Calvert St. At first, Hong says, the new downtown place will be open just for breakfast and lunch. Dinner hours will come later. Breakfast items include berries with yogurt, French toast and blueberry pancakes ($5.50 each)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 6, 2002
Suzie's Soba, a graceful little Asian restaurant in Hampden, has never quite gotten the attention it deserves. Baltimore has other fine Japanese and Korean eating places, but none with the quirky charm of the noodle shop owned by Sue Hi (otherwise known as Suzie) Hong. It's a deliciously funky space, starting with the cheerful neon lips slurping neon soba noodles out front. Inside, you walk past a decorative open kitchen to get to the closely spaced tables that line both side walls in back.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KATHRYN HIGHAM and KATHRYN HIGHAM,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1998
Sue Hi Hong, known about town as Suzie, is a little bit superstitious. So she took it as a sign when she found an ornamental gong that was a perfect fit for a restaurant space she was considering in Hampden. The location, Hong knew, was just right for Suzie's Soba.You might recognize that name from Hong's restaurant in the Belvedere. Since business there is slow in the evening, Hong had been searching for a site at which to open a dinner-only restaurant, one that was small enough for her to handle the cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 11, 1998
I never understood why Stella's (1009 W. 36th St.) in Hampden didn't do better. Denise Whiting, who also owns Cafe Hon across the street, opened the cute little Italian restaurant in fTC 1996, then closed it the next summer when business slacked off, then reopened it last winter. Now she's sold it to Suzie Hong, owner of Suzie's Soba in the Belvedere.Hong fell in love with the location because of the porch in back. She's hired a landscape architect to fill it with plants and flowers and create a decor for the restaurant that's "very natural but trendy."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2003
For area restaurant listings and more reviews or to search for recipes, go to www.SunSpot.net/eatsFunky, charming, delicious Suzie's Soba, a Hampden culinary destination for the past five years, has opened a second location in the historic Munsey Building on Calvert Street. The building, now being converted to high-end apartments, housed the Equitable Trust Co. for more than 80 years. Suzie's kitchen is where the tellers used to be, and the spacious dining area still purrs with the tony ambience of a high-end bank, now Suzie-fied with funky touches like origami fish that seem to float among the bubble-themed artwork, and light fixtures decorated with glass beads and silk flowers.
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 1996
Asian food has exploded in popularity over the last decade and food-trend forecasters are predicting interest in this diverse cuisine will continue to grow.Noodles, the main ingredient in Asian cuisine, have hit the Baltimore area in a big way recently, with several restaurants designing their menus to showcase the affordable, healthful food.In places such as Manhattan, San Francisco and Honolulu, noodles have for the past few years been the trendy fast food, served in bowls of broth with a smidgen of meat or a pile of fresh vegetables.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 12, 1998
Noodles. They're everywhere in Japan. Green noodles, white noodles, thick noodles, thin noodles. The Japanese inhale them like french fries.Rice and sushi are the more well-known staples of the Japanese diets, but if you're on the run, noodles are the way to go.Soba noodles, made from soba flour, are so popular that some Japanese eat them three times a day. They're often served in a broth with all other kinds of goodies - spinach, tempura shrimp, you name...
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 1996
Asian food has exploded in popularity over the last decade and food-trend forecasters are predicting interest in this diverse cuisine will continue to grow.Noodles, the main ingredient in Asian cuisine, have hit the Baltimore area in a big way recently, with several restaurants designing their menus to showcase the affordable, healthful food.In places such as Manhattan, San Francisco and Honolulu, noodles have for the past few years been the trendy fast food, served in bowls of broth with a smidgen of meat or a pile of fresh vegetables.
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