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By DAVE BARRY | February 4, 1996
Skiing is an exciting winter sport, but it is not for everybody. For example, it is not for sane people. Sane people look at skiing, and they say: "Wait a minute. I'm supposed to attach slippery objects to my feet and get on a frozen chair dangling from a scary-looking wire; then get dumped off on a snow-covered slope so steep that the mountain goats are wearing seat belts; and then, if by some miracle I am able to get back down without killing myself, I'm supposed to do this again??"As I get older -- which I am currently doing at the rate of about 5 years per year -- this is more and more how I view skiing.
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NEWS
February 19, 2008
Two incidents - an oversize load that damaged the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel and an accident at the Bay Bridge toll plaza - complicated traffic yesterday. About 8:30 last night, the top of a backhoe secured to a flatbed trailer being pulled by a dump truck struck the roof of the southbound tube of the tunnel, bringing down ceiling tiles and parts of their support structures, said Cpl. Jonathan Green, a spokesman for the Maryland Transportation Authority Police. There were no injuries and no other vehicles were involved, Green said.
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SPORTS
January 4, 1991
Oakland third baseman Carney Lansford was examined yesterday for injuries, described by the Athletics as "serious," suffered in a snowmobiling accident last week, a team spokesman said.Lansford injured his right shoulder and left knee while riding a snowmobile near his home in Baker, Ore., Monday, team spokesman Jay Alves said.Alves said he did not know the exact nature of Lansford's injuries but that no bones were broken. However, a team news release described the injuries as "serious.""He's undergoing tests at this time in San Francisco, and we won't know anything until tomorrow," Alves said.
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 21, 2003
CHICAGO - Standing before a group of schoolchildren, President Bush repeated an oft-stated promise that his environmental policies would stand on hard scientific research. "We'll base decisions on sound science," he said in 2001. "We'll call upon the best minds of America to help us achieve an objective, which is: cleaner air, cleaner water and a better use of our land." But the role of science in forging environmental policy has grown into a central controversy of Bush's presidency. Critics say that although Bush vowed to "rely on the best of evidence before deciding," many of his policies dismiss the scientific recommendations of federal agencies.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 20, 1996
An Elkton man was charged yesterday with stabbing a dog with a buck knife at a Cecil County park and throwing the wounded animal, which later died, into bushes after the dog kept running around his snowmobile.William Robert Shockley, 35, of the 400 block of Gallaher Road was charged with cruelty to animals, inflicting unnecessary pain on a dog and illegally operating an off-road vehicle in a state park. He was released on $1,000 bail.John Surrick, a spokesman for Maryland Natural Resources Police, said the Saturday evening stabbing was witnessed by an Elkton woman and her teen-age son.The woman told police that a dog was running around a snowmobile at Fair Hill Natural Environmental Area.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
ALLENSTOWN, N.H. - They are noisy, smelly and seemingly able to rattle the marrow right out of your bones. Hardly selling points for a new consumer product. The product is the snowmobile. And with one crazy stunt 41 years ago, Edgar Hetteen made snowmobiles a must-have item for residents of North America's snow belt, and launched a $9 billion-a-year industry. There are an estimated 3 million snowmobiles in the United States and Canada. Twenty-six states have snowmobile associations that help maintain 135,000 miles of groomed trails, more than triple the miles in the Interstate Highway System.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
Environmentalists were disappointed when the Bush administration lifted a pending ban on snowmobiles in Yellowstone National Park. Now, it's the snowmobilers' turn to be unhappy. When the telephone reservation system opens tomorrow to begin booking visits under new rules, vacationers will discover there's a limit to their fun. For the first time, they'll have to pay a nonrefundable $10 fee if they want to ride the roads to Old Faithful and the bubbling thermal springs. In most cases, they'll be required to hire a licensed guide.
NEWS
February 20, 1997
Col. Alfredo Enrique Peralta Azurdia,88, a former Guatemalan president, died yesterday of natural causes in a Guatemala City military hospital, army spokesman Col. Edgar Noe Palacios said.The army installed Colonel Peralta, then defense minister, as president in 1963, a year after the first Guatemalan guerrilla groups formed and nine years after civilian rule was overturned by a CIA-backed coup. In 1966, he was replace by elected president Julio Cesar Mendez Montenegro.T. Christopher Pettit,51, a former president of Lehman Bros.
NEWS
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 21, 2003
CHICAGO - Standing before a group of schoolchildren, President Bush repeated an oft-stated promise that his environmental policies would stand on hard scientific research. "We'll base decisions on sound science," he said in 2001. "We'll call upon the best minds of America to help us achieve an objective, which is: cleaner air, cleaner water and a better use of our land." But the role of science in forging environmental policy has grown into a central controversy of Bush's presidency. Critics say that although Bush vowed to "rely on the best of evidence before deciding," many of his policies dismiss the scientific recommendations of federal agencies.
TRAVEL
December 8, 2002
Breathing Easily A Philadelphia Sheraton clears the air for hotel guests The "Do Not Disturb" signs hanging on the doors at the Sheraton Rittenhouse Square Hotel in Philadelphia are made of recycled materials, as is the toilet paper in the bathrooms and the carpet on the floor. The Sheraton, which requires its customers to sign a waiver vowing not to smoke in the building, boasts that it's the nation's most environmentally friendly hotel. It's the first hotel to receive the Green Seal of Approval from Green Seal, a Washington-based environmental organization.
NEWS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 17, 2003
On the eve of the opening of snowmobile season at Yellowstone National Park, a federal judge ordered the National Park Service yesterday to scrap a Bush administration plan to expand snowmobile use in the park and reimpose a Clinton-era policy phasing out the machines. The ruling, in a lawsuit brought by a number of environmental groups, also affects neighboring Grand Teton National Park and the John D. Rockefeller Memorial Parkway, which connects the two parks in northwest Wyoming. The plaintiffs, including the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, argued that the Park Service had ignored its own research that shows that prohibiting snowmobiles would be the best way to protect the parks' resources.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 28, 2003
MONTREAL - Bombardier Inc., the world's third-biggest maker of commercial jets, agreed yesterday to sell its snowmobile and boat unit for C$1.23 billion ($880 million) to a group that includes the founder's family and Bain Capital LLC, taking another step to preserve the company's credit rating. The Bombardier family will keep 35 percent of the business, which was created about 61 years ago in Quebec to mass-produce the "snow vehicle" Joseph-Armand Bombardier invented. Boston-based Bain Capital will get 50 percent and Canada's biggest pension-fund manager will hold 15 percent, the group said in a statement.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
Environmentalists were disappointed when the Bush administration lifted a pending ban on snowmobiles in Yellowstone National Park. Now, it's the snowmobilers' turn to be unhappy. When the telephone reservation system opens tomorrow to begin booking visits under new rules, vacationers will discover there's a limit to their fun. For the first time, they'll have to pay a nonrefundable $10 fee if they want to ride the roads to Old Faithful and the bubbling thermal springs. In most cases, they'll be required to hire a licensed guide.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 21, 2003
Snowmobiles will be allowed in Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park under a compromise announced yesterday that satisfies the builders and users of the machines but guarantees challenges from the environmental community and members of Congress. The proposal, which is expected to be signed March 24, reverses a decision by the Clinton administration that would have banned snowmobiles from the parks by next winter. The park service now plans to cap the number of machines allowed in Yellowstone daily at 950 and limit Grand Teton to 150. Yellowstone now averages 840 snowmobiles daily, but on holidays such as Presidents Day weekend, the total can soar to nearly 1,700.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 16, 2003
WEST YELLOWSTONE, Mont. - There are days, more than Kitty Eneboe cares to count, when being a ranger at the nation's oldest national park is more like being part of a NASCAR pit crew. Hundreds of snowmobiles roar up to her entrance station at Yellowstone National Park and turn crisp evergreen-scented winter air into a malodorous blue-tinged haze capable of inducing headaches and watery eyes. On those days, Eneboe checks park passes from behind the glass of her kiosk as a blower forces clean air inside.
TRAVEL
December 8, 2002
Breathing Easily A Philadelphia Sheraton clears the air for hotel guests The "Do Not Disturb" signs hanging on the doors at the Sheraton Rittenhouse Square Hotel in Philadelphia are made of recycled materials, as is the toilet paper in the bathrooms and the carpet on the floor. The Sheraton, which requires its customers to sign a waiver vowing not to smoke in the building, boasts that it's the nation's most environmentally friendly hotel. It's the first hotel to receive the Green Seal of Approval from Green Seal, a Washington-based environmental organization.
NEWS
February 19, 2008
Two incidents - an oversize load that damaged the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel and an accident at the Bay Bridge toll plaza - complicated traffic yesterday. About 8:30 last night, the top of a backhoe secured to a flatbed trailer being pulled by a dump truck struck the roof of the southbound tube of the tunnel, bringing down ceiling tiles and parts of their support structures, said Cpl. Jonathan Green, a spokesman for the Maryland Transportation Authority Police. There were no injuries and no other vehicles were involved, Green said.
NEWS
By Stanley C. Dillon | November 18, 1990
If you're looking for something different today that has plenty of action and good food, try the grass drags at Kingsdale, Pa.Snowmobiles will reach speeds of 70 mph on a 500-foot grassy drag strip when the Pigeon Hills Snowmobile Club is host for the Mason Dixon Grass Drag Championships. The event will be at the Kingsdale Volunteer Fire Company grounds, north of Taneytown.Races start at noon and gates open at 8 a.m. Admission is $5 for adults and children under 12 are admitted free.Manchester dairy farmer Norman Sellers, race organizer, is an avid snowmobile enthusiast, but says he is not into racing.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
ALLENSTOWN, N.H. - They are noisy, smelly and seemingly able to rattle the marrow right out of your bones. Hardly selling points for a new consumer product. The product is the snowmobile. And with one crazy stunt 41 years ago, Edgar Hetteen made snowmobiles a must-have item for residents of North America's snow belt, and launched a $9 billion-a-year industry. There are an estimated 3 million snowmobiles in the United States and Canada. Twenty-six states have snowmobile associations that help maintain 135,000 miles of groomed trails, more than triple the miles in the Interstate Highway System.
NEWS
February 8, 2001
THE ROAR is so loud that it drowns out the sound of Old Faithful. The air is more polluted than in downtown Los Angeles. That is winter in Yellowstone National Park under the onslaught of snowmobiles. To protect the environment, wildlife and quality of visits, the National Park Service is moving to ban snowmobiles at Yellowstone and two dozen other parks. That effort must not be stayed. The phase-out of snowmobiles reflects long overdue enforcement of an executive order of the Nixon administration, 10 years of environmental study and three years of public hearings and comment.
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