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November 6, 1990
This oriental-inspired dish provides lots of flavor and very little fat and calories. This dish is excellent served over rice. Two-thirds cup white rice, for example Minute Rice, cooked without butter would add an additional 120 calories per serving.WHAT YOU NEED 1 1/4 pounds boneless chicken breasts, skinned, all visible fat removed6 ounces snow peas1 tablespoon cornstarch1/2 cup low sodium chicken broth1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce2 tablespoons vegetable oil2 cloves garlic, minced1/2 teaspoon minced fresh gingerHOW TO MAKE ITRinse chicken and pat dry. Slice into thin strips.
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By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Fe Reyes-Dollete and Roldolfo Dollete's patio container garden grew out of desperation. For 30 years the couple, who are both physicians, tried to grow flowers and vegetables on their suburban property, only to watch deer consume all they grew. Reyes-Dollete recalls one year she managed to grow a particularly beautiful daylily. She went to get her camera to take a picture of it, and when she returned it was gone, eaten by a deer she saw standing in the yard. The couple decided to move their garden to their patio.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 21, 2000
Each spring for the past few years, I have given a cooking class called simply "Salads, Salads, Salads." Without fail the course is always the most popular of the season. The format remains the same every year; I choose four salads that can be used as first courses, as entrees or as side dishes. The menu includes one salad with seafood, another with beef or poultry, one that features vegetables and one that highlights fresh fruit. Students tell me repeatedly that they find themselves using these salads over and over again when entertaining during the warm weather months, when lighter fare is in order.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | May 14, 2008
In Dana Sawyer's household, the combination of a busy single mom and somewhat picky kids has made for some less-than-successful dinner times. Sawyer, of Rodgers Forge, has two daughters, Cameron, 7, and Lauren, 4, and a full-time job as a paralegal. When she gets home from work around 6:15 p.m., she finds she makes the same time-tested recipes with chicken or beef and potatoes or noodles and falls back a bit too often on pizza, Chinese food and Boston Market. Sawyer knew she needed to learn some simple meals that were healthful, incorporated more vegetables and could get to the table before 7 p.m., when "everyone is starving and grumpy."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Schneider and Elizabeth Schneider,Eating Well Magazine United Feature Syndicate | June 26, 1994
While shelling English peas is a good project for a lazy afternoon, sugar peas -- the kind with the edible pods -- are more suited to those of us who are just getting home from the office. The British and French appropriately call them mange-tout, meaning eat-it-all. We know them as two distinct types called snow peas and sugar snap peas.Ribbon-flat, pliable snow peas are also dubbed Chinese snow peas. Curiously, they have nothing to do with snow, and $H originated not in China but in the Near East.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 1997
As the Chinese New Year on Friday welcomes in the year of the Ox, consider this simple and exotic celebration, fit for a king. This recipe not only says fresh but has a kick from the chilies as well as gorgeous colors.As a side dish, serve plain white rice. Have that cooking while you prepare and organize the components for the speedy stir-fry.Fortune cookies are fun for dessert. Serve them with some juicy fresh tiny tangerines called Clementines.Stir-fried salmon, scallops and shrimp with fresh chiliesServes 41 tablespoon canola oil8 ounces cubed salmon fillet8 ounces bay or sea scallops8 ounces medium peeled shrimpSAUCE:1 to 2 fresh chili peppers, about 1-inch long (optional)
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 9, 1997
What you get: 1 pound, 5 ounces (about two 2 1/4 -cup servings)Cost: $2.99Time to prepare: 15 minutes on stovetopReview: This pleasant blend of noodles and crunchy vegetables (broccoli, green beans, red peppers and carrots) gets smothered by the overabundant hot sauce -- even after tossing with boneless chicken breast. Add the optional peanuts and snow peas or bamboo shoots, and you'll diffuse the sauce, creating a fair imitation of Kung Pao chicken. No MSG here, but you'll get 60 percent of a day's dose of salt with each serving.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 29, 1993
New Year's Eve is my favorite night to entertain. However, rather than giving a large party with a crowd of revelers, my husband and I decided long ago we liked sharing this holiday with a small circle of close friends. So, since the '80s we have been welcoming each new year by cooking a special meal with the same group.The ritual is always the same. As the hosts, we are responsible for the table setting and the opening course plus the entree. Others prepare appetizers, side dishes and dessert.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | April 20, 1994
One of my favorite recipe collections is "Chopstix," by Hugh Carpenter, which blends American cuisine so simply with Chinese, Thai and even Mexican flavors. This dish, Oriental burritos, marries the most classic Chinese flavorings with south-of-the-border style. Since it can be eaten by hand, it makes for a casual, friendly meal.To round out the main dish, serve a simple salad of shredded lettuce and quickly steamed snow peas (or buy frozen, stemmed snow peas and thaw before tossing) and a peeled, sliced fresh orange.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | December 7, 1994
Recently I have seen and sampled dishes on restaurant menus with a delicious topping called a Lacquered Sauce. Of course, the ingredients list is usually a mile long and requires hours of chopping, but the revamped version I came up with here calls for less than 20 minutes for prep and cooking time.The Lacquered Sauce can be approached from many directions. You can get the mahogany Asian flavors from a long list of ingredients or you can streamline. This version uses only ingredients found on most home pantry shelves.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | November 21, 2007
This is a quick and low-fat Chinese meal to rival your local favorite restaurant. I have used only vegetables, which I chose for their variety of flavors, colors and textures. Most supermarkets sell fresh Chinese noodles in the refrigerated section of the produce department. Dried Chinese noodles can be found in the Chinese or Oriental food section of the market. Either type works fine. If authentic noodles are difficult to find, use thin spaghettini. Lo mein actually means mixed noodles.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | May 2, 2004
Quick, easy, eye-catching, delicious, healthy. Those are adjectives I would use to describe an ideal main course for today's entertaining. Students in my classes, friends, family members -- in fact, everyone I talk to -- tells me they are pressed for time and welcome recipes that take just minutes to assemble and cook. Many, especially first timers in the kitchen, are drawn to dishes that require modest culinary skills but still make a distinctive visual impression. And all cooks expect their efforts to result in delectable fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2003
Ding How sits on a prime piece of real estate at Broadway and Aliceanna Street in Fells Point. Yet in a neighborhood where most restaurants are tiny and trendy, it is defiantly - or maybe obliviously - neither. While other Fells Point eating places are all about the hardwood floors and exposed brick walls, this boxy Chinese restaurant is appointed in '70s-era beige and bamboo. And forget au courant blues or pop tunes over the sound system. The music at Ding How is so awful that we actually found ourselves subjected to "Pomp and Circumstance."
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | July 2, 2003
I NEVER THOUGHT THIS would happen, but lately I have found myself singing the praises of peas. Until recently, peas and I did not have a happy history. When I was a kid, peas were one of the foods that held me hostage at the table. "Eat your peas," the authorities would order. More than once, an untasted pile of peas on my plate kept me from fleeing the school cafeteria and joining my classmates at recess, or speeding out the kitchen door to play baseball in the evening game that regularly took place in front of our house.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
It may be hard to believe that a fungus could be good for you, but mushrooms actually contain B vitamins and several essential minerals. Just as important, they taste good. Here's a recipe from the Mushroom Information Center that mixes mushrooms with spring vegetables: Bring 2 cups of salted water to a boil, add 1 1/4 cups of snow peas and cook until crisp-tender, about 30 seconds. Drain and rinse under cold water. In a large bowl, combine snow peas, 4 1/2 cups of fresh white mushrooms (thinly sliced)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
It's easy to imagine popping into the Boatyard Bar and Grill after a day of sailing. This is a boat-happy restaurant, located near the Annapolis City Marina, across the Spa Creek Bridge in Eastport. The walls are covered with photographs, paintings and doodads of all things nautical; the handsome wooden bar is in the shape of a boat's hull; and sailboat races are shown on the television in the bar. Boating enthusiast Dick Franyo, who with his wife, Susan, opened the restaurant in October 2001, films local yacht races on Wednesday nights during the racing season, then shows them shortly afterward on television sets in the bar. After September, reruns from the previous season are shown on Wednesdays.
FEATURES
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 8, 1992
Scallops are sweet and tender and need very little cooking. In coquilles a la nage (scallops in light wine sauce), the scallops are gently poached in a light wine sauce that will keep them juicy and tender. Cutting the carrots on a diagonal will make them about the same size and shape as the snow peas that give color and texture to the dish.Porcini, or cepes mushrooms, have a wonderful pungence; only a few are needed to flavor a dish. They are delicate and difficult to find fresh,but are readily available dried.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2001
China Village, on Route 103 (Montgomery Road) in Ellicott City, is as busy as the thoroughfare. Although the 24-seat restaurant is relatively cozy, China Village runs a brisk carryout and delivery trade. "Our customers like General Tso's Chicken the most," says Fanny Xie, co-owner with her husband, Hoa Hoang. "But they also order the House Combo and Happy Family a lot." The House Combination offers seafood, beef, chicken and pork with a variety of vegetables in "house special brown sauce," and Happy Family offers jumbo shrimp, scallops, chicken, beef stir-fried with snow peas, mushrooms, carrots, baby corn and broccoli.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
Ann Popovich of Jeannette, Pa., requested a recipe for vegetable lasagna "with a cream sauce and no tomatoes." Bryon Predika of Baltimore responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. Vegetable Lasagna Serves 18 6 cups thinly sliced onions (about 3 large) 1 stick butter 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon flour 1 1/2 quarts milk 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 3 pounds ricotta cheese 2 eggs 2 to 3 large cloves garlic 1/3 cup chopped parsley 1/4 teaspoon oregano 1/4 teaspoon basil 1/8 teaspoon thyme 2/3 cup grated Romano cheese 1 pound lasagna noodles 1/2 pound asparagus tips, cut into bite-sized pieces 1/3 pound snow peas 1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced 1 pound grated sharp cheddar cheese 1 pound grated Swiss cheese 1 ounce pine nuts In a large skillet with a lid, saute the onions in butter until limp.
NEWS
By Kristin Eddy and Kristin Eddy,Special to the Sun | February 24, 2002
You may be in the mood for a Chinese restaurant classic: shrimp fried rice. This recipe is a lot lighter and brighter than many takeout versions. MENU: Shrimp fried rice Braised bok choy Mandarin-orange salad Lemon cookies Hot spiced tea TIME-SAVING TIPS: * Buying chopped vegetables from a supermarket salad bar will cut down on preparation time. * Buy already-shelled shrimp or even cooked shrimp. Kristin Eddy writes for the Chicago Tribune. Shrimp Fried Rice Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking time: 6 minutes Yield: 4 servings 1/3 cup each: soy sauce, chicken broth 2 tablespoons rice-wine vinegar or sherry 1 / 8 teaspoon ground white or black pepper 1 pound raw shrimp, peeled, deveined 2 tablespoons sesame oil 2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil 1 1/2 cups fresh snow peas 1/2 cup each: fresh or frozen corn kernels, shredded carrot 2 bunches green onions, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 eggs, beaten 2 cups jasmine or long-grain white rice, cooked Combine soy sauce, broth, vinegar and pepper in a small bowl; set aside.
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