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Snow Geese

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NEWS
By Cindy Ross | April 4, 2011
The sky is beginning to glow pink as we bank the turn into the entrance of Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area in Pennsylvania. We hurry, not wanting to miss the show that is about to begin. Although we can't see the estimated 100,000 snow geese floating on the sheltered lagoon, we hear their communal voices. It's March, and these magnificent white birds are here for only a few weeks during their migratory passage to the Arctic. After resting and fattening up on local farm crops, they'll continue north to Canada's St. Lawrence River, ending eventually at their Alaskan mating and breeding grounds.
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TRAVEL
By Rona Kobell, For The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
This would be the one where we stayed home, my husband and I agreed before the recent holidays. No Christmas flight to Texas to visit his family. No four-hour drive through the mountains to Pittsburgh for Thanksgiving dinner with my dad. With two busy careers, an active 8-year-old and a toddler who had taken to saying "no night-night" when it's time for bed, we didn't have the energy. Even a low-maintenance weekend jaunt to New York on BoltBus seemed like too much work. But then the 8-year-old read "Misty of Chincoteague" that wonderful book about a horse born in the wilds of Assateague Island and raised on Chincoteague Island.
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NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | March 12, 2006
Howard County police have opened an investigation into the illegal dumping of about two dozen dead snow geese at a Columbia playground this month, police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn said Friday. Maryland Department of Natural Resources police decided not to open a similar case last week after they found no evidence of illegal hunting. Snow geese have a liberal bag limit of 15 birds per hunter per day. Hunting season ended Feb. 25. Residents found the birds March 2 in Kings Contrivance village, and their deaths were first reported in the Columbia Flier.
NEWS
By Cindy Ross | April 4, 2011
The sky is beginning to glow pink as we bank the turn into the entrance of Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area in Pennsylvania. We hurry, not wanting to miss the show that is about to begin. Although we can't see the estimated 100,000 snow geese floating on the sheltered lagoon, we hear their communal voices. It's March, and these magnificent white birds are here for only a few weeks during their migratory passage to the Arctic. After resting and fattening up on local farm crops, they'll continue north to Canada's St. Lawrence River, ending eventually at their Alaskan mating and breeding grounds.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | March 10, 2006
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources will not pursue hunting-related charges in the deaths and dumping of about two dozen snow geese found near a Columbia playground this month, Sgt. Ken Turner said yesterday. Turner said that snow goose hunting season ended Feb. 25 and that his agency had no evidence that the birds, were "killed illegally" or after that date. The birds were found March 2, and their deaths first reported in the Columbia Flier. Turner said that any law enforcement agency, including his own, could pursue illegal dumping - or littering - charges in the case, but that his agency would not do so. Turner said that the birds had been shot and some of their breasts removed, apparently for food.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | December 1, 1996
BOMBAY HOOK, Del. -- When the Dutch acquired this marshy point from the Indians in 1679, they called it Boompies Hoock. It's said the price they paid was a musket and powder, some liquor and a steel kettle -- about what they paid to buy Manhattan. I'd rather have Bombay Hook.Since 1937 there has been a national wildlife refuge here, more than 16,000 acres worth, mostly marsh but also including some wooded upland and several big freshwater ponds. Tidal rivers like the Leipsic, Duck Creek and my favorite, Old Woman's Gut, pass through it. It's a wonderful place to see birds of all kinds, especially migrants.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
TUCKAHOE STATE PARK - Snow geese, once on the verge of extinction, have become such a nuisance that Maryland and Delaware have expanded their hunting seasons for the birds, established reciprocal hunting license agreements and increased bag limits. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is preparing an environmental impact statement for nontraditional methods of holding down the population of the beautiful white birds with black wing tips, including a spring hunting season, allowing hunters to use electronic calls and authorizing longer shooting hours.
TRAVEL
By Rona Kobell, For The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
This would be the one where we stayed home, my husband and I agreed before the recent holidays. No Christmas flight to Texas to visit his family. No four-hour drive through the mountains to Pittsburgh for Thanksgiving dinner with my dad. With two busy careers, an active 8-year-old and a toddler who had taken to saying "no night-night" when it's time for bed, we didn't have the energy. Even a low-maintenance weekend jaunt to New York on BoltBus seemed like too much work. But then the 8-year-old read "Misty of Chincoteague" that wonderful book about a horse born in the wilds of Assateague Island and raised on Chincoteague Island.
SPORTS
December 27, 1990
* LOCH RAVEN: Both white and yellow perch for shore-line anglers.* LOWER DORCHESTER: Plenty of sikas for muzzleloaders.LAKE ANNA: This Virginia hotspot has big white perch, some stripers and bass.* KENT COUNTY: More snow geese now available. Canadas are plentiful.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | February 5, 1995
Maryland's Mid-Winter Waterfowl Inventory, an aerial survey taken between Jan. 3 and 13, showed a significant increase in ducks and snow geese and a small drop in Canada geese, according to statistics released last week by the Department of Natural Resources.The total number of waterfowl increased from 549,800 in 1994 to 651,300 this winter. Canada goose numbers were 259,200 compared to 260,300 last year.In the Canada goose hunting season, said Larry Hindman, waterfowl project manager, preliminary information suggests that adult birds dominated the kill again.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | March 6, 2008
We heard spring peepers for the first time Tuesday night. The little frogs are my favorite harbinger of spring. Almost simultaneously, I received this dispatch from Kurt Kolaja, on the Eastern Shore: "The spring migration is on. I don't know who said it; wish it had been me: `There are two seasons here on the Shore - when there's geese, and when there ain't.' Flocks of Canada and snow geese, along with invisibly high swans, are on the move ... just below the stars."
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | March 12, 2006
Howard County police have opened an investigation into the illegal dumping of about two dozen dead snow geese at a Columbia playground this month, police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn said Friday. Maryland Department of Natural Resources police decided not to open a similar case last week after they found no evidence of illegal hunting. Snow geese have a liberal bag limit of 15 birds per hunter per day. Hunting season ended Feb. 25. Residents found the birds March 2 in Kings Contrivance village, and their deaths were first reported in the Columbia Flier.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | March 10, 2006
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources will not pursue hunting-related charges in the deaths and dumping of about two dozen snow geese found near a Columbia playground this month, Sgt. Ken Turner said yesterday. Turner said that snow goose hunting season ended Feb. 25 and that his agency had no evidence that the birds, were "killed illegally" or after that date. The birds were found March 2, and their deaths first reported in the Columbia Flier. Turner said that any law enforcement agency, including his own, could pursue illegal dumping - or littering - charges in the case, but that his agency would not do so. Turner said that the birds had been shot and some of their breasts removed, apparently for food.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2004
As global demand for flights has grown, so has the number of planes in the air - and so have the collisions with birds that can't always maneuver around the fast and quiet modern jets. But after about a decade of effort, aviation and wildlife experts believe they are pecking away at the costly and sometimes tragic problem that has caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damages annually and almost 200 deaths since 1990. Innovations beyond shooting migrating Canada geese and other feathered, and some furry, wildlife are being shared in Baltimore this week at an international conference on bird "strikes."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
The Snow Geese, by William Fiennes. Random House. 288 pages. $24.95. This is one man's story about finding his way home. No, wait, it's about how birds find their way home. Truth be told, it's both: the story of how an Englishman follows geese from their winter sanctuary in southern Texas to their breeding grounds in northern Canada and in the process discovers what Dorothy said on the silver screen more than 60 years ago - there's no place like home. William Fiennes' first book, is an unusual breed, a part-travelogue, part-bird book that almost works to perfection.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
TUCKAHOE STATE PARK - Snow geese, once on the verge of extinction, have become such a nuisance that Maryland and Delaware have expanded their hunting seasons for the birds, established reciprocal hunting license agreements and increased bag limits. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is preparing an environmental impact statement for nontraditional methods of holding down the population of the beautiful white birds with black wing tips, including a spring hunting season, allowing hunters to use electronic calls and authorizing longer shooting hours.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | March 6, 2008
We heard spring peepers for the first time Tuesday night. The little frogs are my favorite harbinger of spring. Almost simultaneously, I received this dispatch from Kurt Kolaja, on the Eastern Shore: "The spring migration is on. I don't know who said it; wish it had been me: `There are two seasons here on the Shore - when there's geese, and when there ain't.' Flocks of Canada and snow geese, along with invisibly high swans, are on the move ... just below the stars."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Greater snow geese present a burgeoning problem, one the Department of Natural Resources wants to get under control before the population of snows potentially doubles in the next decade.Greater snows have been increasing in the Atlantic Flyway since the mid-1960s. More than 600,000 greater snows now winter in Maryland and Delaware, according to DNR, damaging or destroying habitat critical to the survival of other species -- and perhaps ultimately themselves.Snow geese feed by eating the root stalks of plants such as saltmarsh cordgrass, destroying the entire plant and eventually eliminating the marsh.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1999
Unlike the migratory Canada goose, the snow goose has flourished in the Atlantic Flyway, growing to the point that farmers, landowners and waterfowl managers want great numbers of them eliminated.Snow geese are voracious feeders and destroy habitat by consuming even the roots of plants in coastal marshes and grain fields. The long-term effects of heavy grazing are devastating for other species of waterfowl and wildlife that share habitat with snow geese.Aerial surveys of snow geese on the St. Lawrence River this spring produced an estimate of 800,400 birds staging for their migration north to Bylot Island, the main breeding area in the Canadian Arctic.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The Department of Natural Resources yesterday submitted its final proposals for waterfowl seasons to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, including a 60-day duck season with five-duck bag limit. Duck hunters will be allowed to take one additional teal during duck season, bringing the total bag to six. The USFWS has allowed Maryland to extend the snow goose season to 107 days, with the last of three splits ending March 10. Split dates for snow geese are Oct. 16-Nov. 26, Dec. 6-Jan.
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