Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSnow Days
IN THE NEWS

Snow Days

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
It will soon be payback time for Maryland students who have spent those lazy snow days sleeping until 10 a.m., playing with friends and sledding. Twenty-two of Maryland's 24 school districts have already plowed through the days they build into their annual calendars for snow and bad-weather closings, according to an unofficial tally by state education officials made before this week's storm. State law requires students to go to school for 180 days.     See updated closings for Thursday So if the snow falls as predicted and schools close a day or two this week, local superintendents will have to start adding days.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | April 3, 2014
The Harford County public school system included seven days in the academic calendar this school year as potential makeup days in case of snow. Turns out, the school system ended up canceling classes 11 times (or 12 if the state doesn't allow the two and a half hour day to count), which means if the school year ends on June 12, Harford County students will not have attended classes for the requisite 180 days required by state standards. The school system, therefore, has requested a waiver from the Maryland State Board of Education, which has authorized the state superintendent to grant or deny such waivers.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | February 8, 2010
Just when the snowplows and shoveling might allow schools to be open on Tuesday or Wednesday, a second storm with at least 5 inches of snow could arrive Tuesday night. Will area students walk through the doors of their schools any day this week? If not, school districts might be back where they were after the Presidents Day storm of 2003, having used up all or nearly all of their snow days. All public schools in the Baltimore region, and the majority around the state, will be closed today.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
J. Robert Clark's letter ( "Waivers are for lazy teachers," March 30) is particularly disturbing since I spent 42 years in Baltimore classrooms. He attacks teachers as being lazy because they want waivers to excuse snow days. Then he throws in that he is a Baltimore County bus driver who doesn't get paid much and then moves to attack U.S. educational performance, followed by a tirade against the Common Core curriculum. If he had any focus to his rant, it seems to be that teachers are lazy.
NEWS
January 28, 2000
Anne Arundel County schools will reopen Monday. To make up for lost days, students will lose the Feb. 21 Presidents Day holiday, and they may lose a day of spring vacation. The system has used its four emergency closing days. Baltimore schools will be closed today for a previously scheduled professional in-service day. The school system has used all three allotted snow days. The school year is scheduled to end June 16. Baltimore County schools will open two hours late today and there will be no morning kindergarten.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
When some kids hear the hallowed words "snow day" in advance of Monday's storm, they'll grab their coats and sleds and head outdoors. But Maryvale Preparatory School senior Elizabeth Piet, like a growing number of students across the Baltimore region, will power up her iPad to see what assignments her teachers have waiting. Both private and public schools are turning traditional snow days into cyber days that sometimes require students to use the Internet and email to stay connected to their teachers, allowing educators to stick more closely to lesson plans during a winter that's included more severe weather than usual.
EXPLORE
July 5, 2011
The Howard County Public School System is the very last in the state to finish the school year, dragging it out until June 22. Yes, while Frederick, Montgomery, Carroll county children that my children know are laughing at us, my kids are taking final exams. Why? The short answer is that they didn't plan for any/enough "snow" days. That is nothing short of ridiculous! The school system that closes or delays school when there is so much as one snowflake didn't plan on having to close school?
NEWS
March 9, 1994
The Howard County school board meets tonight to wrestle with the difficult problem of how to make up the 11 school days that have been lost this year because of snow.Eleven is the count so far. Even one additional day will make an already bad situation worse. As it is, none of the options available is a good one.For kids who were gleeful when the first flake of snow hit the ground, there is now a realization that a price will have to be paid in June.Teachers, likewise, have started to grumble.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | February 27, 1993
While Baltimore County students and teachers slept late on Friday, a chunk of their spring vacation disappeared in a puff of snow.Just hours before the storm began, the county school board chopped two days from the middle of the April break in a series of last-minute calendar changes brought on by snow closings, budget cuts and state mandates.With Friday on the books as this year's second snow-closing day, here's the drift of what the board did to compensate:*The snow days will be made up on Monday and Tuesday, April 5 and 6, the first two weekdays of what had been a weeklong spring holiday.
NEWS
February 6, 2000
Several counties are taking advantage of the state's offer to waive some snow days. Talbot County has received approval for its request to be excused from four days that students have missed because of bad weather. Montgomery County, which had used up its four snow days, will be excused from making up two of them. State Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick announced last week that all Maryland counties were eligible to have up to four days waived from the 180-day school attendance rule if schools were closed because of the governor's declaration of a state of emergency for Hurricane Floyd in September and last week's snowstorm.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
I feel I must respond on behalf of all of us "lazy teachers" who feel work is beneath them ( "Waivers are for lazy teachers," March 29). Letter writer J. Robert Clark obviously does not realize that we work the same amount of days every school year regardless of how many snow days we have. I know of no teacher who feels that work is beneath them. In fact, many of my colleagues get to school early and stay late, well beyond their contractual obligations. Our objections to Common Core have nothing to do with laziness.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Maryland Superintendent Lillian M. Lowery informed Anne Arundel County on Friday that she will not waive five days of school for the district because of snow this year. As a result, Anne Arundel spokesman Bob Mosier said, the school district has decided to ask Lowery to allow the county to open schools on Easter Monday, making up one of the five days it needs to meet the requirement that students be in session for 180 days a year. "So, we set about trying to make what adjustments we could now," Mosier said.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
I don't know if it was poor reporting by The Sun or poor accounting by Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance, but in an article about technology in schools you recently wrote that Mr. Dance would "pay for the computers in part by evaluating whether central office employees who leave the school system should be replaced" ( "Baltimore County school board OKs $205 million technology contract," March 11). I'm not a bookkeeper, but I can't recall when the act of evaluating ever helped pay for anything.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
The snow continued to play havoc with school schedules Monday, delaying the beginning of state testing in some places and keeping students home for yet another day. All Baltimore-area school systems have used more days than allotted in the school calendar for snow and must find ways to make up those days. School districts also are adjusting their schedules for state testing, which was scheduled to begin Tuesday in some counties, as some students still might have trouble getting to school or focusing on academics.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
When some kids hear the hallowed words "snow day" in advance of Monday's storm, they'll grab their coats and sleds and head outdoors. But Maryvale Preparatory School senior Elizabeth Piet, like a growing number of students across the Baltimore region, will power up her iPad to see what assignments her teachers have waiting. Both private and public schools are turning traditional snow days into cyber days that sometimes require students to use the Internet and email to stay connected to their teachers, allowing educators to stick more closely to lesson plans during a winter that's included more severe weather than usual.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
I really think it's time my 12-year-old son took the white crayon from the window sill. As kids everywhere know, if you want a snow day from school, put the white crayon by the window and turn your pajamas inside out. This year, the superstitions worked beautifully. The schools have now run out of snow days and I've run out of patience. Don't misunderstand me. I love snow and the way it brightens up the dark and dreary winter landscape. And now that I'm a college professor, I, too, get snow days off from teaching.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
It will soon be payback time for Maryland students who have spent those lazy snow days sleeping until 10 a.m., playing with friends and sledding. Twenty-two of Maryland's 24 school districts have already plowed through the days they build into their annual calendars for snow and bad-weather closings, according to an unofficial tally by state education officials made before this week's storm. State law requires students to go to school for 180 days.     See updated closings for Thursday So if the snow falls as predicted and schools close a day or two this week, local superintendents will have to start adding days.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 11, 2014
When the leadership of a school system makes a decision about whether to cancel classes because of bad weather, there will be criticism. Another truism of making such decisions is that mistakes will be made, resulting in even harsher criticism. Given these realities, those making the decisions should always be prepared to make their mistakes on the side of safety. Over the past several years in Harford County, the practice has been to err on the side caution, sometimes resulting in canceling schools on days when the weather ends up not posing a hazard.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.