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By PETER A. JAY | June 16, 1994
It's here! World Cup soccer! In the United States! The sport that enthralls the globe will soon be appearing on our very own home television sets. Quick, somebody, bring me a No-Doz.It's hard to say why even the prospect of watching international soccer slows my pulse and makes my eyelids heavy, but it does, and I know a lot of other people who experience the same symptoms. Yet soccer isn't intrinsically boring. It's fast, easy to understand, demands and displays a variety of athletic skills, and doesn't require much equipment.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Dr. Lewis B. Newberg, a retired ear, nose and throat specialist who turned his personal battle with sleep apnea and snoring into a book in which he combined humor and practical medical advice for those similarly afflicted, died Oct. 22 of heart failure at his Edgewater home. He was 72. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Newberg was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., where he was a graduate of public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he earned his medical degree in 1964 from the Chicago Medical School.
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FEATURES
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
Not long after Laureen and Lewis Newberg got married last December, the bride began to consider sleeping in a different bedroom."It was very, very rough," recalls Mrs. Newberg. "We were newlyweds and I thought to myself, 'What have I gotten into?' "Her husband snored. Loudly. So loudly, she had trouble sleeping. So loudly, the couple's children from previous marriages complained about The Noise."They would say they couldn't hear the TV, and they were downstairs," she says.But the Newberg house slumbers peacefully these days thanks to a new and increasingly popular laser procedure to treat snoring -- a problem that afflicts an estimated 30 million Americans.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 28, 2011
Dr. Lewis B. Newberg, a retired ear, nose and throat specialist who turned his personal battle with sleep apnea and snoring into a book in which he combined humor and practical medical advice for those similarly afflicted, died Oct. 22 of heart failure at his Edgewater home. He was 72. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Newberg was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and raised in Jamaica, N.Y., where he was a graduate of public schools. After earning a bachelor's degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he earned his medical degree in 1964 from the old Chicago Medical School.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
The Suttons had tried everything from soft music to earplugs. Nothing could stop Charles Sutton's snoring and give his wife, Carol, a good night's sleep.Now they are hoping that a new laser procedure will let them both sleep easier.When the Crownsville couple sought help from Dr. Douglas Finnegan, an Annapolis ear, nose and throat specialist, he suggested the laser procedure as an alternative to painful and expensive surgery. The procedure was developed in Europe a few years ago, but only introduced in the United States in May.Sitting in the patient's chair in Dr. Finnegan's office last week, Mr. Sutton was nervous, but determined to go ahead with his first treatment.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | August 18, 2009
Severe nightly episodes of interrupted breathing during sleep - commonly known as sleep apnea - double the risk of death for middle-age men, according to a new study being called the largest ever conducted on the disorder. Even men with moderate sleep apnea - anywhere from 15 to 30 instances of oxygen deprivation per hour - appear to be 45 percent more likely to die from any cause than those who have no nighttime breathing problems. As many as one in four men is believed to suffer from sleep apnea, researchers said, and many with less severe apnea may not even know they have it, even though it can dangerously decrease the oxygen in their bloodstream.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
When Patricia Berg phoned Anne Arundel County Police last Thursday to report a possible prowler, the Glen Burnie resident thought she would receive help, and fast. But before local authorities could respond to her call for assistance, Berg had to wait a few moments -- for a tired 911 call-taker to finish his nap. According to police records, Berg's emergency call about 2:45 a.m. July 29 was delayed for one minute and 42 seconds as Louis Gerber, one of the county's 911 call-takers, fell asleep and snored into the phone.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 15, 1994
Members of my family have heard terrible noises in the night, which resemble a building going down. After careful scrutiny and analysis, they are now reporting the source of such noises, which turns out -- against anything I personally would have imagined -- to be snoring."
NEWS
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 7, 2001
A man -- we'll call him "Harvey" -- went to see a doctor, complaining of tiredness, bruises all over his body, shooting pains, and quotation marks around his name. The doctor immediately recognized these symptoms: "Harvey" had a snoring problem. At night, he was being jabbed repeatedly by his wife, trying to make him shut up. Also, somebody had apparently been shooting him. Yes, snoring is a serious health problem, one that affects more Americans than shark attacks and Rep. Gary Condit combined.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 11, 2007
Not since the Victorian age of starched sheets and starchy manners, builders and architects say, have there been so many orders for separate bedrooms. Or separate sleeping nooks. Or his-and-her wings. In interviews, couples and sociologists say that often it has nothing to do with sex. More likely, it has to do with snoring. Or with children crying. Or with getting up and heading for the gym at 5:30 in the morning. Or with sending e-mail messages until well after midnight. In a survey in February by the National Association of Home Builders, builders and architects predicted that more than 60 percent of custom houses would have dual master bedrooms by 2015, according to Gopal Ahluwalia, staff vice president of research at the builders association.
EXPLORE
October 12, 2011
In Aberdeen, mayors come and mayors go, just like anywhere else. This year, there's a contested race for mayor in the city that hosts the post, but it doesn't hold the promise of being a particularly interesting one. Incumbent Mike Bennett is challenged by Patrick McGrady, who has risen to prominence in the local Tea Party related movements and who ran unsuccessfully for the Maryland House of Delegates in 2010. Bennett's previous success has come through running low key campaigns that involve a lot of door-to-door work on his part and that of his supporters.
NEWS
August 31, 2009
Good and adequate amounts of sleep are essential for the growth and development of children. Sleep problems vary with age. For example, younger children may suffer from snoring and sleep apnea. Sleep terrors and sleepwalking also are common. For teens, sleepiness is commonly caused by inadequate sleep from later bedtimes combined with early start times of typical high schools. Dr. Robert Meny, a pediatric sleep specialist at the St. Joseph Medical Center Sleep Disorders Center, explains the most common sleep problems for children, how parents can cope and when to seek professional help.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | August 18, 2009
Severe nightly episodes of interrupted breathing during sleep - commonly known as sleep apnea - double the risk of death for middle-age men, according to a new study being called the largest ever conducted on the disorder. Even men with moderate sleep apnea - anywhere from 15 to 30 instances of oxygen deprivation per hour - appear to be 45 percent more likely to die from any cause than those who have no nighttime breathing problems. As many as one in four men is believed to suffer from sleep apnea, researchers said, and many with less severe apnea may not even know they have it, even though it can dangerously decrease the oxygen in their bloodstream.
NEWS
By Christopher T. Assaf and Christopher T. Assaf,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | November 18, 2007
The Maryland State House is similar to a marble mausoleum: Not much changes over time but the residents. Politics and the creaking advancement of democracy are the session norm. This process involves piles of paper and a lot of pontification, both stuffed with procedural formality. What little evolves does so lazily, trickling along like a withdrawing glacier. From this photographs are to be made. Better yet, photographs with visual interest. The difficult part arises in trying to create stimulating pictures of people who, for the most part, do one or more of the following: Stand with microphone, sit listening, stare at laptop screens, read papers or quietly converse in person or by phone.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | September 6, 2007
What if you went to bed on time last night, thought you got a good night's sleep, but still woke up feeling tired? You may be suffering from a potentially serious disorder called sleep apnea, says Uday Nanavaty, chief pulmonologist at St. Agnes Hospital. Sleep apnea can cause people to be drowsy and irritable during the day and have difficulty staying awake at school, work or even while driving. The name "sleep apnea" comes from the Greek for "without breath." How do you describe the disorder?
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Reporter | March 11, 2007
FEELING A LITTLE GROGGY this morning and blaming the switch to daylight-saving time? Maybe you ought to look at the person on the other side of the bed instead. Americans aren't sleeping well. About 70 million of us have problems sleeping, according to the National Institutes of Health. In spite of our dual-control beds covered in high thread-count Egyptian cotton sheets, Breathe Right nasal strips to eliminate snoring and, of course, the magic Lunesta butterfly and other potent sleeping aids, we still aren't getting our recommended z's. What's even worse, our bed partners are often to blame.
NEWS
August 31, 2009
Good and adequate amounts of sleep are essential for the growth and development of children. Sleep problems vary with age. For example, younger children may suffer from snoring and sleep apnea. Sleep terrors and sleepwalking also are common. For teens, sleepiness is commonly caused by inadequate sleep from later bedtimes combined with early start times of typical high schools. Dr. Robert Meny, a pediatric sleep specialist at the St. Joseph Medical Center Sleep Disorders Center, explains the most common sleep problems for children, how parents can cope and when to seek professional help.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 11, 2007
Not since the Victorian age of starched sheets and starchy manners, builders and architects say, have there been so many orders for separate bedrooms. Or separate sleeping nooks. Or his-and-her wings. In interviews, couples and sociologists say that often it has nothing to do with sex. More likely, it has to do with snoring. Or with children crying. Or with getting up and heading for the gym at 5:30 in the morning. Or with sending e-mail messages until well after midnight. In a survey in February by the National Association of Home Builders, builders and architects predicted that more than 60 percent of custom houses would have dual master bedrooms by 2015, according to Gopal Ahluwalia, staff vice president of research at the builders association.
NEWS
April 14, 2006
Toxicology Men more affected by amphetamines Amphetamines appear to have a greater effect on men's brains than women's, a finding that could help doctors develop better treatments for addiction and neurological diseases, according to a study by the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The research found that men's brains showed up to three times the amount of the chemical dopamine as women's when exposed to amphetamines. Hopkins scientists will publish the results July 1 in The Journal of Biological Psychiatry.
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