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NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 22, 1996
If the summer of '96 left pop fans with a profound sense of deja vu, as such reconstituted rock bands as KISS and the Sex Pistols toured the country, the fall ought to provide welcome relief -- at least to an extent.With new albums on the way from Dr. Dre, Sheryl Crow, Crash Test Dummies, Counting Crows, Phil Collins, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Babyface, Alan Jackson, Snoop Doggy Dogg and the "Evita" soundtrack (featuring Madonna), there will be no shortage of fresh sounds for the pre-Christmas season.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 10, 1998
In the wee hours of March 9, 1997, Christopher Wallace -- a man known to millions of rap fans as Biggie Smalls or Notorious B.I.G. -- was shot to death while sitting in a black Chevy Suburban outside the Petersen Automotive Museum in the Wilshire district of Los Angeles.Coming barely six months after the similarly violent demise of fellow rap star Tupac Shakur, Biggie's death left the rap world reeling. There was an immediate outpouring of grief -- and a flood of rumors. Many wondered if the two deaths weren't an outgrowth of the much-hyped gangsta rap "war" between the West Coast crew of Death Row Records (of which Tupac was a part)
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FEATURES
By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 26, 1995
Near the end of "The Show," an up-close look inside the world of hip-hop, a group of old-school rappers sharing war stories at a coffee shop are asked to discuss the meaning of hip-hop.Their answers center on expression -- the craft of creating new rhymes, capturing all kinds of situations, performing. Somebody gets up and imitates a gangsta rapper by moving from side to side, implying that the new stars don't work very hard to entertain. "You come to see us, you see a show," says one veteran.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 10, 1997
Things ought to look pretty good for Death Row Records right now. This week finds the Death Row soundtrack to "Gridlock'd" -- which features the late Tupac Shakur both as co-star and musician -- atop both the Billboard Hot 200 and R&B Albums charts.Moreover, the "Gridlock'd" album kicks off with a duet between 2Pac and the label's other big name, Snoop Doggy Dogg. Add in a new, MTV-friendly single from Snoop himself (a cover of the Biz Markie oldie "Vapors") plus continuing strong sales for Makaveli's "The Don Killuminati" album (another 2Pac project)
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 28, 1994
Dr. Dre and Snoop Doggy Dogg were among the big winners when the Source Awards -- the world's first rap-oriented awards show -- were handed out in New York's Paramount theater Monday night.Dre, easily the evening's biggest winner, took home trophies for Artist of the Year (Solo), Album of the Year and Producer of the Year. Among those productions was Snoop Doggy Dogg's debut, "Doggy Style," a title that helped Snoop win the New Artist of the Year (Solo) and Lyricist of the Year awards.Staten Island's Wu-Tang Clan were named New Artist of the Year (Group)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1995
Issues involving teens and sex occupy two programs, including an NBC TV movie about a school official sexually harassing students and a PBS special making a serious examination of pregnancy and sex education in schools.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- The old mistaken-sexual-identity plot gets a twist. Catherine Oxenberg guest- stars as a publicist hired by Maxwell (Charles Shaughnessy). He's interested in her, but she's eyeing someone else. CBS.* "Murphy Brown" (9 p.m.-9:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 9, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Pity poor Robert L. Grace Jr. He's the co-prosecutor in the case of rap star Snoop Doggy Dogg, a.k.a. Calvin Broadus, who is on trial for murder in Los Angeles.It would be tough enough under any circumstances for Deputy District Attorney Grace, 35, to go up against the high-powered legal talent that a well-heeled defendant like Snoop Doggy Dogg can afford. But it doubles the burden for Mr. Grace that he is a black man prosecuting a black man in Los Angeles in 1996. After the racial tensions surrounding Rodney King, Reginald Denny and O.J. Simpson, Mr. Grace's skin color puts him on a tightrope, torn by conflicting loyalties to blacks, whites and the criminal-justice system.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers | December 16, 1993
THE LINE between fantasy and reality is becoming dangerously blurred in the rap music world.In the past few months, several rappers whose songs have offered a glimpse into the crime, despair and violence of inner-city life have themselves been labeled criminals. Many of them are perpetrators of the hard core "gangsta rap" that glorifies murder, mayhem, misogyny and drug abuse.Rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg is riding a wave of crossover success unprecedented for hip-hop performers.His rise to fame as co-rapper of the movie soundtrack "Deep Cover" featured him menacingly chanting "It's 1-8-7 [the police terminology for murder]
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 9, 1994
Warren G's approach to making records is fairly straightforward. "I try to do stuff different from everybody else," says the soft-voiced 23-year-old over the phone from a tour stop in Miami. "I put lyrics, rap lyrics, to music that people wouldn't usually put lyrics to, you know what I'm saying? That's basically it."Sounds simple enough, doesn't it? But there must be more to it than that, because G Funk -- Warren G's term for the supple, bass-heavy hip-hop style he specializes in -- has clearly struck a chord with rap fans around the country.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 5, 1995
One night last month two incidents -- a music award and a killing -- pointed up the relationship between artistry and violence that defines Death Row Records, the nation's hottest producer of "gangsta rap" music:The debut album of Snoop Doggy Dogg, Death Row's charismatic superstar, took top honors at the Soul Train Music Awards. A few hours after the show, a 28-year-old fan was fatally stomped at a party the company threw for its out-of-town retailers and promoters.The slaying was the latest example of how Death Row's meteoric rise has been marked by violence and legal problems involving its key figures.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 22, 1996
If the summer of '96 left pop fans with a profound sense of deja vu, as such reconstituted rock bands as KISS and the Sex Pistols toured the country, the fall ought to provide welcome relief -- at least to an extent.With new albums on the way from Dr. Dre, Sheryl Crow, Crash Test Dummies, Counting Crows, Phil Collins, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Babyface, Alan Jackson, Snoop Doggy Dogg and the "Evita" soundtrack (featuring Madonna), there will be no shortage of fresh sounds for the pre-Christmas season.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 9, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Pity poor Robert L. Grace Jr. He's the co-prosecutor in the case of rap star Snoop Doggy Dogg, a.k.a. Calvin Broadus, who is on trial for murder in Los Angeles.It would be tough enough under any circumstances for Deputy District Attorney Grace, 35, to go up against the high-powered legal talent that a well-heeled defendant like Snoop Doggy Dogg can afford. But it doubles the burden for Mr. Grace that he is a black man prosecuting a black man in Los Angeles in 1996. After the racial tensions surrounding Rodney King, Reginald Denny and O.J. Simpson, Mr. Grace's skin color puts him on a tightrope, torn by conflicting loyalties to blacks, whites and the criminal-justice system.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 3, 1995
IF SOMEONE mentions the names of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman, most folks would readily identify them as the two people who were killed by either O. J. Simpson or some as yet unidentified party in July 1994.Now here's a question: Who's Philip Woldemariam?Don't be embarrassed if you don't know. You really have to search to find out anything about the guy.Mr. Woldemariam was only 20 years old when a man pumped two bullets into him in Los Angeles' Woodbine Park on the evening of Aug. 25, 1993.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1995
Issues involving teens and sex occupy two programs, including an NBC TV movie about a school official sexually harassing students and a PBS special making a serious examination of pregnancy and sex education in schools.* "The Nanny" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- The old mistaken-sexual-identity plot gets a twist. Catherine Oxenberg guest- stars as a publicist hired by Maxwell (Charles Shaughnessy). He's interested in her, but she's eyeing someone else. CBS.* "Murphy Brown" (9 p.m.-9:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 26, 1995
Near the end of "The Show," an up-close look inside the world of hip-hop, a group of old-school rappers sharing war stories at a coffee shop are asked to discuss the meaning of hip-hop.Their answers center on expression -- the craft of creating new rhymes, capturing all kinds of situations, performing. Somebody gets up and imitates a gangsta rapper by moving from side to side, implying that the new stars don't work very hard to entertain. "You come to see us, you see a show," says one veteran.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 5, 1995
One night last month two incidents -- a music award and a killing -- pointed up the relationship between artistry and violence that defines Death Row Records, the nation's hottest producer of "gangsta rap" music:The debut album of Snoop Doggy Dogg, Death Row's charismatic superstar, took top honors at the Soul Train Music Awards. A few hours after the show, a 28-year-old fan was fatally stomped at a party the company threw for its out-of-town retailers and promoters.The slaying was the latest example of how Death Row's meteoric rise has been marked by violence and legal problems involving its key figures.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 23, 1993
If controversy really does sell CDs, now is the time to be in th record business. Three of the most notorious acts in popular music are unleashing new albums today: Rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg, the Dr. Dre cohort currently under indictment for murder; Beavis and Butt-head, the animated MTV twosome whose show has been blamed for everything from arson to the decline of Western Civilization; and Guns N' Roses, the riot-inciting hard rock act whose name has become...
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | January 20, 1994
The gloomy countenance of rap artist Snoop Doggy Dogg recently graced the cover of Newsweek magazine. The caption noted that his most recent album hit number one on the charts at about the same time he was indicted for murder.Beads of sweat were noticeable on the rapper's face, which evoked defiance touched with a -- of bewilderment -- as if he were wondering whether his next album would be cut from the pernicious digs of San Quentin or Soledad.Snoop Doggy Dogg, born Calvin Broadus, is in the eye of the storm of controversy that surrounds ''gangsta'' rap. Some radio stations have refused to play it. Ministers and women's groups have condemned the genre for its glorification of violence and its misogynistic lyrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 9, 1994
Warren G's approach to making records is fairly straightforward. "I try to do stuff different from everybody else," says the soft-voiced 23-year-old over the phone from a tour stop in Miami. "I put lyrics, rap lyrics, to music that people wouldn't usually put lyrics to, you know what I'm saying? That's basically it."Sounds simple enough, doesn't it? But there must be more to it than that, because G Funk -- Warren G's term for the supple, bass-heavy hip-hop style he specializes in -- has clearly struck a chord with rap fans around the country.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 28, 1994
Dr. Dre and Snoop Doggy Dogg were among the big winners when the Source Awards -- the world's first rap-oriented awards show -- were handed out in New York's Paramount theater Monday night.Dre, easily the evening's biggest winner, took home trophies for Artist of the Year (Solo), Album of the Year and Producer of the Year. Among those productions was Snoop Doggy Dogg's debut, "Doggy Style," a title that helped Snoop win the New Artist of the Year (Solo) and Lyricist of the Year awards.Staten Island's Wu-Tang Clan were named New Artist of the Year (Group)
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