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By Charles J. Holden and Zach P. Messitte | March 8, 2012
With the Republican presidential nomination contest in high gear, Marylanders might be forgiven for smiling. The word "snob" has returned with full force to presidential politics after a four-decade hiatus. Former Sen. Rick Santorum (Penn State University '80, University of Pittsburgh '81, Dickinson School of Law '86), in an old-fashioned beat-down on higher education, recently informed us that President Barack Obama is "a snob" for wanting Americans to go to college, where they would be indoctrinated by "some liberal college professor.
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BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | December 27, 2013
I have a confession to make. I kind of love Red Lobster. Yes, I live in the land of the jumbo lump crabcakes and fresh rockfish, but there's something oddly comforting for me about the chain restaurant that my dad took me to as a kid. I'm known for forcing my uppity Maryland friends to make the trek to White Marsh or Columbia or now Arundel Mills! (What can I say I'm a fan.) Once a busboy stopped my party from being seated because the table was "still a little buttery. " I loved it. So I have been watching with concern as my favorite chain restaurant has fallen on hard times.
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FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 12, 2001
This is my punishment for being a cookie snob. I have been assigned to test some of the quick-and-easy-cookie recipes that abound this time of year. The ones that use shortcuts like cake mix in place of several ingredients or have a "secret" (read bizarre) ingredient like potato chips. The ones that have brand names instead of ingredients like unsalted butter and fresh eggs. When I tell a friend -- also a cookie snob -- about my story, she says, "What on earth is wrong with sugar, butter, flour, nuts and chocolate, the fab five?"
EXPLORE
By Lisa Airey, thewinekey@aol.com | December 13, 2012
Wine is subjective. It's a matter of personal taste and everybody's tastes are different. This is not just a question of personal preference. It has a lot to do with how we are hard-wired. For example, the average recognition threshold for sugar is 1percent. At 1 percent sugar, half the population will recognize a wine as "sweet" while the other half will either have recognized sweetness below that concentration or need additional sugar to acknowledge its presence. This is why two people drinking the same wine can have markedly different perceptions.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | October 5, 1994
Hold on to your hats, Maryland wine fans. Don't let the modest price tag fool you. This is serious, full-bodied white wine. Made from the underrated seyval blanc grape, this wine delivers just as much flavor, intensity and complexity as many $20 chardonnays. There's plenty here: toasty oak, vanilla, peach, pear, dry essence of honey, spices. It would be fun to serve this blind to some California wine snob.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | December 14, 2005
This dry white wine from New Zealand is delightfully fresh and made to be drunk young. It offers vibrant and penetrating flavors of gooseberry, sweet pea, lime, mineral and herbs. While it's very much a "fun" wine, it is also very skillfully crafted. There's no shame in serving it to anyone but the rankest snob -- and you don't want to drink with that fellow anyway. Serve with --shellfish, light-flesh fish, finger food
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | September 13, 2006
Compared with Italy or Spain, Greece is a latecomer to the modern world of scientific winemaking, but this dry white from the Peloponnese region demonstrates that nation's tremendous potential. The Moschofilero, made from the grape of that name, is an intensely flavorful, bone-dry white with crackling flavors of lemon, apple, melons and minerals. Not only is it elegant and fascinating, it would be a wickedly baffling wine to serve blind to your friendly local wine snob. Serve with white-fleshed fish, such as sole.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | February 9, 2000
Vigil Vigilante Red, Numero Tres, Table Wine ($10). Here's a hearty, fruity, somewhat rustic red wine that is just perfect for quaffing with hamburgers or a bowl of chili. This is not a wine for deep contemplation, but for inexpensive enjoyment. It offers straightforward beef and black currant flavors and a certain edgy intensity. It's a unique blend, whose largest component is the little-known Blue Portuguese variety (which, naturally, is native to Austria). Have a wine snob friend? Cover the back label, serve this wine and ask him or her to identify the grapes in the blend.
NEWS
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,Boston Globe | January 28, 2007
Once upon a time, snobbery was a bad thing, a character flaw indulged in by effete elites and condemned by everyone else. But is snobbery going mainstream? Are snob appeal and mass appeal converging? The recent holiday season confirmed that many of us have begun "behaving as if we're rich," in the words of author James Twitchell. The country is on a status binge that has made the quest for luxury goods the new national pastime. And the rules of the game evidently are: No guilt, no limits.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
Peanut butter prices are set to climb by as much as 40 percent because of the devastated peanut crop, so we asked our staff about which foods they would go broke for. •••• Sandwiches from the Avanti Market. Mmm, mmm!  Editor's note: This is our company cafeteria, where Luke is sometimes found hovering over the pastrami and swiss.  Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun •••• “Nutella-jelly time” doesn't have the same ring to it as “peanut butter-jelly time,” but I'll take hazelnut over peanut.
NEWS
By Charles J. Holden and Zach P. Messitte | March 8, 2012
With the Republican presidential nomination contest in high gear, Marylanders might be forgiven for smiling. The word "snob" has returned with full force to presidential politics after a four-decade hiatus. Former Sen. Rick Santorum (Penn State University '80, University of Pittsburgh '81, Dickinson School of Law '86), in an old-fashioned beat-down on higher education, recently informed us that President Barack Obama is "a snob" for wanting Americans to go to college, where they would be indoctrinated by "some liberal college professor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
A number of years ago a serious chef, baker and food writer named Beth Hensperger got an assignment from her publisher: A slow-cooker cookbook. She declined. More than once. Vehemently. "I was like, 'Oh my God … It doesn't fit in with my style of living,'" says the woman with her James Beard award and California cooking pedigree. "It was not an easy match for me. " But Hensperger eventually did it, releasing, "Not Your Mother's Slow Cooker Cookbook," followed with five sequels.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
Peanut butter prices are set to climb by as much as 40 percent because of the devastated peanut crop, so we asked our staff about which foods they would go broke for. •••• Sandwiches from the Avanti Market. Mmm, mmm!  Editor's note: This is our company cafeteria, where Luke is sometimes found hovering over the pastrami and swiss.  Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun •••• “Nutella-jelly time” doesn't have the same ring to it as “peanut butter-jelly time,” but I'll take hazelnut over peanut.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 4, 2011
In promoting his book, "States of Confusion: My 19,000-Mile Detour to Find Direction," author Paul Jury put up a video on the Internets that stereotypes every state in the country in less than two minutes. The video already has more than 1.2 million views on YouTube.  What was Maryland's stereotype?  For our fair state, Jury positioned himself on a couch in comfortable-looking living room, holding a glass of red wine. He said, "Have Jeeves bring the lobster boat around.
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | February 28, 2008
Oh, we Mac users are a sensitive lot. Numerous Mac-oriented Web sites have been weighing in on a video report by Brittany Umar of TheStreet.com that had a little fun with some statistics on what sort of people use Macs. Most of those sites had several pages of comments from less-than-amused Mac users pointing out how few, if any, of the characteristics described in the video - provocatively titled "Mac Users Are Snobs" - applied to them. Citing the original research by Mindset Media, Umar says Mac users are apt be "self-centered," "arrogant," "conceited" and "self-important."
NEWS
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,Boston Globe | January 28, 2007
Once upon a time, snobbery was a bad thing, a character flaw indulged in by effete elites and condemned by everyone else. But is snobbery going mainstream? Are snob appeal and mass appeal converging? The recent holiday season confirmed that many of us have begun "behaving as if we're rich," in the words of author James Twitchell. The country is on a status binge that has made the quest for luxury goods the new national pastime. And the rules of the game evidently are: No guilt, no limits.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | February 19, 1995
For my sins, I have just read " The Bridges of Madison County." For sins yet uncommitted (and some, I hope, still unimagined), I have also just read " Border Music."As the chart above this column demonstrates, " The Bridges" has been on national best seller lists for 129 weeks. Warner Books, its publisher, reports it has produced 5,293,000 copies in 61 printings, and an additional 3,128,300 copies of Robert James Waller's second novel, " Slow Waltz at Cedar Bend." " Border Music" has just turned up, with 1.1 million in print.
NEWS
By TIM WARREN Title: "Josephine: The Hungry Heart" Authors: Jean-Claude Baker and Chris Chase Publisher: Random House Length, price: 532 pages, $27.50 and TIM WARREN Title: "Josephine: The Hungry Heart" Authors: Jean-Claude Baker and Chris Chase Publisher: Random House Length, price: 532 pages, $27.50,LOS ANGELES TIMES Title: "Torsos" Authors: John Peyton Cooke Publisher: Mysterious Press Length, price: 352 pages, $19.95 KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 3, 1994
Title: "Dances With Trout"Author: John GierachPublisher: Simon & SchusterLength, price: 205 pages, $21 John Gierach knows he's got just about the best job in America: He goes fishing a lot and then he writes about it. He lives in a little cabin near the St. Vrain River in Northern Colorado -- no kids, no time clock to punch. His hours are spent fishing for big Colorado rainbow trout or Alaskan grayling, or hunting snowshoe hares in the Rockies, or tying flies. If he's tired, he reads a lot.He also is one terrific writer, as he shows in "Dances With Trout," his eighth collection of outdoors pieces.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,Morning Call | October 22, 2006
Countless Americans have decorated their homes for Halloween, but many could have received better value for their money if they had bought those decorations at a dollar store. Holiday decorations are one example of the fantastic buys at variety stores going by such names as Dollar General, Family Dollar, Dollar Tree, Fred's and 99 Cents Only Stores. "You've got to look around, but you can get a ton of stuff cheap," said Wes Sass, who has self-published a brief guide to dollar stores, Living on 99 Cents.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 25, 2006
Over the years, I've run into just about every kind of beverage snob you could run into. I've run into wine snobs, who seem to drink the stuff just so they can prattle on and on about its bouquet and complexity and bore the hell out of everyone. I've run into beer snobs who only buy the hottest microbrew and look down on anyone drinking a Bud or Heineken as the Great Unwashed. I've run into coffee snobs who have to pay five bucks for an Arabian Mocha Sanani at the designer coffee emporiums to be spiritually fulfilled, and when you mention getting a cup of Folgers at the diner, they scrunch up their faces and make gagging sounds.
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