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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 20, 2002
Despite the appearance of rap superstar Nelly in the small but crucial role of a hip-hop phenom named Prolifik, Snipes plays like a moldy oldie. Although Nelly is top-billed in the ads, the real lead is Sam Jones III as Erik, a high school student known as Philadelphia's top "sniper" - the term for kids who blanket buildings and street poles with ads for rap acts. The shortening of that term to "snipes" may refer to Wesley Snipes, since Erik's best friend, an aspiring rap artist himself, wants to be called Nino Brown, in homage to Snipes' role in New Jack City.
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NEWS
April 22, 2014
Maryland voters will head to the polls to pick the Democratic and Republican nominees for governor nine weeks from today, and the state of the race thus far is pretty depressing. Most of the oxygen in the contest is being sucked up by an unilluminating series of attacks and counter-attacks between Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown. It's like we're stuck on a long car ride with two feuding brothers in the back seat. Mr. Gansler brought things to a new low on Monday when he said Mr. Brown's service as a military lawyer in Iraq was not "a real job. " This led to a round of outrage from the Brown camp, a clarification (but not an apology)
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FEATURES
By Mal Vincent and Mal Vincent,The Virginian-Pilot | December 12, 1994
Laurence Fishburne and Samuel L. Jackson get the critical notice, but it's cool cat Wesley Snipes who rules the box office.Not that he's hurt for raves. Since breaking out three years ago in "New Jack City," Mr. Snipes has taken on consistently larger and more varied roles. Figure in his looks and charisma, and he's what the movie industry likes to call "bankable."He's also to the 1990s what Sidney Poitier was two decades ago: The African-American star of his generation.As Mr. Snipes walks through the door, the first thing you notice is his shaved head.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 21, 2014
One of the best and most enduring aspects of presidential cabinets has been the willingness of many chief executives to appoint at least one member from the opposition party. The practice demonstrates bipartisanship and also gives the president access to views that may not always be offered by loyalist appointees. The custom of reaching across the party aisle has been brought into question by the new memoir of former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, kept in the job by President Obama as a carryover from the George W. Bush presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 6, 1992
Wesley Snipes is such a singular, riveting presence on screen it seems a shame to waste him on something as generic as "Passenger 57." It's like putting Anthony Hopkins or Al Pacino in an Alpo commercialThe hijack thriller is cobbled together out of pieces of other movies that, generally, weren't any good either. It's strictly a for-the-dollars and by-the-numbers money machine.Snipes plays some kind of vaguely defined "security expert" who is haunted by guilt because he tried to stop a holdup at a convenience store and only succeeded in getting his wife killed.
FEATURES
By Mark Caro and Mark Caro,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 31, 2004
Oliver Stone's The Doors is reaching a fever-dream climax, with Jim Morrison/Val Kilmer about to screech something about his mother amid the throb of "The End," when the bottom third of the screen explodes in a lime-green flash. Talk about your bad trips: It's an on-screen promo for Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. OK, so maybe that's what you get for watching The Doors on Bravo in the first place. Bravo used to skim the cream of the art-film coffee, but that was before the network got bought by NBC. Now it's home to Celebrity Poker, West Wing reruns, Queer Eye and Inside the Actor's Studio.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 25, 1993
Wesley Snipes doesn't enter a room so much as explode into it, a slash of cosmic lightning from the planet of the supremely talented, so lit up with juice and jazz and attitude he can even excite . . . journalists.And so when he shazams into a New York hotel banquet room in service to his new co-starring vehicle, "Rising Sun," it's more like rising temperatures or rising wind currents or something: He's a blur, a tangle of arms, legs and eyes, a riot of noise and sound effects, rogue ergs of energy around the room, incendiary opinions, fierce glares and deeply contemptuous snorts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 25, 1994
Washington -- Well, he admits, there were some on his team that weren't too crazy about him playing another drug dealer."But I wanted to act," says Wesley Snipes, who went ahead and committed to "Sugar Hill," the complex "Godfather"-like drama of a dealer's withdrawal and redemption.Snipes, in person, is a lean, wily presence, whose eyes are even more intensely riveting than they are on screen. Rare among movie stars, he's not a disappointment in the flesh; he's no little man with a big head, plated teeth, bad breath and bad clothes that only a close-up camera could love.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 13, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Actor Wesley Snipes, star of the film "New Jack City," accused Los Angeles police officers yesterday of racial harassment during a recent traffic stop -- a claim echoed by several other black actors.The actor said he was ordered out of his car by police and forced to lie face-down on the pavement, where he was spread-eagled and handcuffed while one officer knelt on his neck and put a 9mm handgun to his head.The incident occurred about midnight Sunday after the actor left a movie set in a leased late-model Mustang that had been mistakenly reported as stolen, Mr. Snipes said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doris Toumarkine and Doris Toumarkine,The Hollywood Reporter | December 30, 1994
In what New York City officials are calling a first, the city police department and Mayor's Film Office have paved the way for Columbia Pictures' big-budget "Money Train" to shoot in Times Square on New Year's Eve.Approximately 300 extras will be joining the 300,000-plus throng of revelers and multitude of news and broadcast crews expected tomorrow night at one of the world's most celebrated NewYear's Eve gatherings.The shoot won't involve the film's stars, Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson, but will capture footage for a key chase sequence at the end of the film when Mr. Snipes, a good-guy decoy cop, chases his adversaries on a motorcycle.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
Maryland's gubernatorial candidates sniped at each other Thursday in their second and likely final televised debate, while focusing on transportation, immigration, the Redskins and other issues dear to the Washington suburbs. Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. appeared more focused and at ease than he had earlier this week in the first debate, firing off crowd-pleasing one-liners. Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley played it safe, sticking mostly to his campaign talking points and avoiding gaffes.
NEWS
July 30, 2009
On July 27, 2009, ROBERT L. COLEMAN. Survived by lifetime companion, Sarah L. Perkins; brother James E. Coleman (Dorothy); two sisters, Willie Rose Snipes (GA), Juanita Coleman-Tyler and a host of other family and friends. Family will receive friends at the WYLIE FUNERAL HOMES, P.A., OF BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road on Friday from 5 to 7 P.M. On Saturday, Mr. Coleman will lie in state at the Union Baptist Church, 1219 Druid Hill Avenue, 11 A.M Wake, 12 P.M Funeral. Entombment following.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks will sponsor its Great Snipe Hunt -- a hay ride and trek into the woods to search for the (imaginary) Rockburn Snipe, largest of the species. Bring a large brown paper bag and a flashlight. The event for children ages 4 to 7 with parents will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday at Rockburn Branch Park in Elkridge. No harm will come to the snipe. The cost is $20 for a family of up to five people. Registration is required because space is limited.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | May 28, 2007
Spike Lee is a happy guy and not because he is in those ready-made-ingredient food commercials where the delivery guy mistakes him for a Chinese cook. Spike and Paramount have nabbed Wesley Snipes to play the movie role of the late great James Brown. Noonan's report Here's a strictly personal report from my pal Peggy Noonan of The Wall Street Journal about a social burst of true philanthropy. Peggy usually writes about politics but in this case she was telling of the wonderful Lily Safra, and all she has done for the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,New York Times News Service | March 18, 2007
BUTLER, Ga. -- The cool, busy lobby of the Taylor County courthouse features a bulletin board, a Dr Pepper vending machine and two framed rosters honoring World War II veterans. It is easy to spot the slight difference in wording that justifies displaying two plaques instead of one. This list says "Whites," and that list says "Colored." County officials explain that the segregated plaques continue to hang because state law says no publicly owned memorial dedicated to veterans of the United States - or of the Confederate States of America - shall be relocated, removed, concealed, etc., etc. "Fifty-dash-three-dash-one, subparagraph B," recites Edward N. Davis, the county attorney.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Faye Fiore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- On a day when the federal deficit and the Iraq war were the official business, Washington found itself caught up again yesterday in the question of whether House Speaker Nancy Pelosi should fly home to San Francisco in a big plane or a little one. To recap: Security rules permit the speaker - second in line to the presidency - occasional use of a military passenger jet. Republican Dennis Hastert used one when he was speaker to commute to...
NEWS
By Scott Wyman and Jean-Paul Renaud and Scott Wyman and Jean-Paul Renaud,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | October 28, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Hoping to avoid another presidential election fiasco, Broward County officials scrambled yesterday to replace tens of thousands of missing absentee ballots, reduce long waits for early voting and shore up a telephone system deluged with calls from angry voters. A day after acknowledging that as many as 58,000 absentee ballots have not reached voters who requested them, elections supervisor Brenda Snipes decided to mail new ones. She will pay extra for overnight delivery for those sent outside Broward in hopes of ensuring voters can return them before Tuesday's deadline.
NEWS
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,New York Times News Service | March 18, 2007
BUTLER, Ga. -- The cool, busy lobby of the Taylor County courthouse features a bulletin board, a Dr Pepper vending machine and two framed rosters honoring World War II veterans. It is easy to spot the slight difference in wording that justifies displaying two plaques instead of one. This list says "Whites," and that list says "Colored." County officials explain that the segregated plaques continue to hang because state law says no publicly owned memorial dedicated to veterans of the United States - or of the Confederate States of America - shall be relocated, removed, concealed, etc., etc. "Fifty-dash-three-dash-one, subparagraph B," recites Edward N. Davis, the county attorney.
NEWS
October 8, 2006
Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks will present the Great Snipe Hunt! for children ages 4 to 7 and their parents from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday at Rockburn Branch Park in Elkridge. A campfire, crafts and s'mores are planned, followed by a hay ride and trek into the woods to search for the "Rockburn snipe." Children should bring a large brown paper bag and a flashlight to catch and release the imaginary creature. The cost is $15 a family. Information or to register: 410-313-7275; text telephone, 410-313-4665.
FEATURES
By CHAUNCEY MABE and CHAUNCEY MABE,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 27, 2006
When Wesley Snipes declined the television reprise of the half-vampire superhero he played in three respectable B-movies, fan message boards predicted Blade: The Series would be the worst sci-fi show in action-adventure history. Which would, of course, be impossible, considering that history includes such cable and syndicated monsterpieces as Earth: Final Conflict, TekWar, Andromeda and Total Recall 2070. Lost in the uproar over the loss of Snipes was the good news: David S. Goyer, who wrote all three Blade theatricals, and directed the last one, signed on to shepherd the franchise's transition to Spike, where it will be the man-boy netlet's first scripted drama.
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