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NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | August 22, 2006
The fugitive's tattoo gave him away, as two Baltimore police officers apprehended the subject of a citywide escape alert yesterday morning. Rolf, the bomb-sniffing German shepherd, had been at large since disappearing from his handler's home Saturday night. He was returned to the custody of the Maryland Transit Administration Police. On Sunday the MTA Police put out a "be-on-the-lookout" bulletin to police agencies and the news media concerning the 2-year-old dog, assigned to Officer Donald Paige.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Federal prosecutors pursuing a drug money case based in part on a police dog whose certification has been questioned said in court filings this week that the dog might actually have been properly trained. The case stems from the seizure of $122,000 in suspected drug money at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport last fall. An attorney for a woman who claims the money is hers asked a judge to throw out the case, alleging that prosecutors used a faked K-9 training certificate produced by the Maryland Transportation Authority Police to bolster their case.
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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 21, 1990
The big-eating holidays may be weeks away, but I'm already in training.The other night I taught the kids how to sniff cognac.This was a skill I had recently picked up during a lunch with Robert Leaute, master blender of cognacs for Remy Martin. The lunch was on a yacht, and as we bobbed in the Baltimore harbor, Leaute explained how to sniff out the subtleties of cognac, a type of brandy made from champagne grapes and distilled in the Cognac area of France. In between bobs, I took notes.I figured this ritual could come in handy as a form of after-dinne entertainment during the upcoming holiday gatherings of our clan.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, June 11, 1964: Glue sniffing was in the rise in Harford County among people ages of 13 to 17. Dr. Henry Freimuth, a toxicologist from the office of the Chief Medical Examiner, furnished the following information relating to the habit of glue sniffing. The practice of glue sniffing is a means of obtaining a cheap high. Most sniffers fail to realize the practice could be habit-forming and may cause harmful after effects. Drowsiness, stupor and unconsciousness may follow.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - When a police dog sniffs the air to detect drugs, is it conducting a police search? The Supreme Court said yesterday that it will decide. The Constitution forbids "unreasonable searches" by the police, and in the past the high court has said officers may not search a car for drugs unless they have some reason to suspect the motorist is breaking the law. In November, the Illinois Supreme Court threw out drug charges against a motorist who was stopped for speeding on Interstate 80. After one officer had stopped the car, a second police officer arrived and circled the car with a "drug-detection dog."
NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | December 8, 2006
I'd rather eat chocolate chip cookies than smell them" - JOE BOROULLIETTE, 50, said after sniffing scented bus shelter ads put up in San Francisco on Monday by the milk industry. The advertisements were taken down later in the week after people complained.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | October 20, 1994
In a sign of the growing problem of inhalant abuse in Howard County, three eighth-grade boys at Mount View Middle School in Marriottsville were taken to an area hospital yesterday after sniffing nail polish remover.Another eighth-grader apparently had brought the nail polish remover to school in a plastic container inside a plastic bag, said Patti Caplan, a school spokeswoman. The three boys were overcome while sniffing it shortly after 1 p.m., she said.One of the three was taken by ambulance to Howard County General Hospital; the other two were taken there by their parents, said Howard County police spokesman Sgt. Steven Keller.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 4, 2008
The minute that the weather turns summery, the air should be filled with the smoke from barbecue cookers. So on a recent sunny afternoon I drove around the Baltimore area, sniffing for smoke and eating pulled-pork sandwiches. I found several, including two very good ones. Smokers Barbeque Address --2833 Baltimore Blvd., Finksburg Phone --410-861-8675 Hours --10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday The pork in this $5.25 sandwich was dry and somewhat chewy. It was helped by a tangy sauce.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | August 3, 1992
New Orleans. -- I don't know what dogs do elsewhere in the dog days of summer, but here they just lie down and melt in furry puddles that bite when you step on them. Even police dogs are out of commission right now, so the police are training pigs to do dogs' jobs. A narcotics-sniffing Vietnamese pot-bellied pig named Tootsie and her porcine partner, Baby Doll, were introduced by the New Orleans police to the press.At approximately the same time, a police surveillance team sans pig swooped down on two lovers smooching over a parking meter.
NEWS
April 11, 1991
The man who walked into an Odenton Church last month and sniffed theminister's shoe has been commited to a psychiatric institute, countypolice.Police spokesman Officer V. Richard Molloy said police are withholding the identity of the man who walked into the Epiphany Episcopal Church on Odenton Road on March 17. He will not be charged.Molloy said the man's family admitted him to Shepherd Pratt Hospital in Baltimore.The Rev. Phebe Coe called police after the man walked into the church during a social function, took her shoe off andbegan sniffing it. He also took some children's shoes and began sniffing them, police said, before leaving the church.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
There probably have been five times in the past 20 months or so that I've written a game story about Chris Tillman's continued emergence/maturation as a pitcher. Several times I've written about whether he is - or is at least on his way to becoming -  a staff ace. Whenever I've asked scouts or baseball executives about Tillman, though, I'm told he is a No. 2 starter, maybe a No. 3 on a great team. But then you see what he did Sunday, and you have to wonder, if he can do that consistently, why he can't earn that ace label.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
A bomb threat at the Lowe's store at Westview Shopping Center in Catonsville caused the store to be evacuated Wednesday afternoon, Baltimore County police said. An unidentified person called the store in the 5900 block of Baltimore National Pike just after 4 p.m. and said there was a bomb in the store, and store management immediately evacuated the building, police said. Police responded shortly after with bomb-sniffing dogs, said Louise Rogers-Feher, a Baltimore County police spokeswoman.
FEATURES
David G. Savage and Tribune Washington Bureau | January 10, 2012
The Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide whether police may use a drug-sniffing dog at the front door of a house or an apartment to detect marijuana, even if the officers have no evidence of criminal conduct. The decision in a Florida case will be the latest test of the 4th Amendment's protection against "unreasonable searches" in drug cases. It also will be the third in a trilogy of rulings on drug-sniffing dogs. In the past, the court has upheld the use of dogs to sniff luggage at airports and to sniff around cars that were stopped along the highway.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
Underneath the mattress isn't going to cut it. Neither will tucking it behind the stack of "Twilight" books. Not even pushing it deep into the toe of a smelly gym shoe. The dog will find it. And he'll know it's not oregano. A new service in Maryland is promising parents peace of mind by allowing them to essentially rent a drug-sniffing dog, a highly trained canine that will come to their house and within seconds, detect even the tiniest whiff of narcotics. The program allows ordinary moms and dads access to a search tool typically reserved for law enforcement — and typically aimed at suspected criminals.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
The grounds of the school in Afghanistan where students linger each week to chat with their Glenelg Country School friends via webcam are riddled with buried landmines, the lethal souvenirs of decades of war. Risking life and limb hasn't deterred the group of boys from Roshan High School in Laghman Province from staying past sunset to exchange ideas with their American counterparts on the other side of the world, local organizers say. ...
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | June 14, 2009
THE PROBLEM: A sewer pipe leaks in a Lauraville alley. THE BACK STORY: Watchdog sniffed out the back story behind a leaky - and stinky - sewer pipe in the alley behind Marty Walunas' house in Northeast Baltimore's Lauraville neighborhood. The leak was inspected several times, but it has not been fixed since the problem was first reported last June. When the weather gets warmer, "it stinks to high heaven," Walunas said. He has reported the leak at least five times. City crews have promptly responded to his 311 calls, but despite several different tests, none seems to have solved the problem, according to Walunas.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 4, 1999
PASADENA, Calif. -- Nate Lewis earned his scientific name coaxing chemical leaves to pull energy from sunlight. A decade ago, he led a team that handily debunked the myth of cold fusion. Now, Lewis is onto what may be his most difficult project: He's building an artificial nose.The restless 43-year-old chemist started sniffing at the project because it was uncharted territory. Of all the human faculties, smell remains the least studied and most misunderstood.Undaunted, Lewis is busy untangling the chemical riddle of smell -- an achievement that could have large economic and social consequences.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 5, 1991
The father recites the last months of his son's life in a numb voice. The school principal announces the death over the public address system. The juvenile officer sends condolences to the family of the deceased.Everybody says it shouldn't have happened, that Chester Wiczulis, 17 years old, shouldn't be dead today, only nobody knows how it could have been stopped.Some of the kids knew him as Chester the Cheetah. They said he could jump off a roof and land on his feet. He was quick, and he knew karate, and a lot of the kids said you didn't want to mess with Chester right up until the glue sniffing and the paint sniffing started getting the best of him."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 10, 2008
Maryland State Police troopers and nine drug-sniffing dogs swept through the city juvenile lockup yesterday as part of an investigation into a recent drug problem in the secure facility. A three-hour search of the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center turned up one cell phone but no narcotics - evidence, one juvenile official said, that tighter facility policies are working. Searches last week, without the dogs, revealed enough marijuana to roll five to eight joints, plus cigarettes and three cell phones, said John Dixon, deputy secretary of the state Department of Juvenile Services.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 4, 2008
The minute that the weather turns summery, the air should be filled with the smoke from barbecue cookers. So on a recent sunny afternoon I drove around the Baltimore area, sniffing for smoke and eating pulled-pork sandwiches. I found several, including two very good ones. Smokers Barbeque Address --2833 Baltimore Blvd., Finksburg Phone --410-861-8675 Hours --10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday-Saturday The pork in this $5.25 sandwich was dry and somewhat chewy. It was helped by a tangy sauce.
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