Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSneeze
IN THE NEWS

Sneeze

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 3, 2013
I'm not trolling for any sympathy, since I got to spend the whole week in New Orleans covering the buildup to the Super Bowl, but it hasn't been all happy hours and fancy "Hurricane" drinks for this former party animal. The only party I got invited to was the media party last Tuesday night, and every fool with a credential gets invited to that. Some of my friends got into the Rolling Stone (Magazine) party, which must have been rockin'. The Playboy and Sports Illustrated Swimsuit parties also are very hot tickets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 3, 2013
I'm not trolling for any sympathy, since I got to spend the whole week in New Orleans covering the buildup to the Super Bowl, but it hasn't been all happy hours and fancy "Hurricane" drinks for this former party animal. The only party I got invited to was the media party last Tuesday night, and every fool with a credential gets invited to that. Some of my friends got into the Rolling Stone (Magazine) party, which must have been rockin'. The Playboy and Sports Illustrated Swimsuit parties also are very hot tickets.
Advertisement
NEWS
By BARBARA TUFTY | September 16, 1993
Washington. -- Sneeze if you must -- but don't blame the goldenrod!The real culprit for hay fever these autumn days is ragweed, a coarse, many-leafed green-flowered plant that thrives everywhere -- in meadows, edges of woods, in empty city lots, in the corner of your garden if you don't watch out.Goldenrods have long been cursed and maligned erroneously for causing the itchy noses and throats and swollen eyes of late summer. But it's ragweed that should take the rap. Both plants come into full flower in late August and September -- one of the worst seasons for allergy-prone folks.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 12, 2008
Heather Johnson's symptoms kicked in after Tropical Storm Hanna's rains quit and she opened her windows to let in some fresh air. "By the next day, I'm all congested, I can't breathe," she said between coughs. But she wasn't sick. The raspy voice, the congestion, the severe sinus pain and all the rest of Johnson's complaints were allergy symptoms - likely the result of what specialists describe as an especially bad couple of weeks in this year's late-summer ragweed season. "We've been very busy," said Dr. Peter S. Creticos, clinical director of the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Johns Hopkins.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | April 24, 1994
If spring has you sneezing, you have lots of company -- about 40 million to 50 million allergy sufferers in the country. Traveling // in that condition, sufferers know, is not pleasant. Spring -- you guessed it! -- is the worst season. Then summer: 73 percent of respondents to a new survey suffer most at these times.Travel writer Arthur Frommer, Dr. Jay Grossman and Efidac/24, a 24-hour over-the-counter nasal decongestant, offer some solutions.Before you go:* Identify the allergens in the area you'll be visiting.
FEATURES
By Anthony R. Wood and Anthony R. Wood,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 2, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- Michelle Robertson assumed it was a nasty cold that kept showing up every year around this time. She had days when she would sneeze her head off. She had trouble driving.She missed time from her job as a medical assistant at a doctor's office, and when she did show up, the patients would look at her red, swollen eyes and give her friendly advice: See a doctor.She did. "I just couldn't take it anymore," said Robertson, 25. She learned that, like about 20 percent of the population, she was allergic to pollen.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 22, 2000
THE NEXT TIME you have a head cold, look at it in a humorous light. Consider writing a funny story for children. Then find a talented illustrator and a major publisher. Maybe one day your book will be on the list for school book fairs. That's the story behind "The Flea's Sneeze," the third children's picture book by Hampstead author Lynn Downey. Henry Holt Inc., which found illustrator Carla Firehammer, publishes it with Hallmark cards. Next year, Downey's book will be available at school book fairs.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 3, 1994
Rose fever or hay fever.Whatever the name, it's pure agony.And it's in the air.The other day I was sweeping my wooden front porch. The boards were dusted with something that resembled dry mustard powder. It was in the air. It was everywhere. Science calls itpollen.Within minutes, my eyes were red. I was coughing and sneezing. Again. And again. Then three more upper respiratory eruptions. By comparison, the downtown noontime Monday air raid whistle sounds quiet.In recent years, we've taken to calling this condition allergies, but the seasonal names are more descriptive and less clinical.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2004
Barely 1 1/2 years after its first play in December 2002, Bay Theatre Company's fifth offering, Anton Chekhov's The Sneeze, establishes the company's reputation for superbly acted, high-quality plays. Co-founders Lucinda Merry-Browne and Janet Luby are adept at selecting small-cast plays that work well in the intimate theater space. Merry-Browne directs six of the seven Sneeze vignettes - with the title one directed by Jim Chance - and she plays supporting roles, while Luby is featured in three of the seven.
NEWS
By Jacqueline Evert | May 21, 1997
I see you from a distanceon the drab sidewalkstrolling by colorless buildingscauterizingthe polluted airwith your purple badge of courageYou are totally intactUp closer your skin is dead whitepellucidlike fine Italian marblethere is a nose ring,ring in lower lipI wonder how it feelsif you blow your nosewhen you sneeze or have a coldyou are so youngDo you still kiss a loverpassionately?How would lips feel hard uponthat metal ring?Would it mean inducement?Are these odditiessimply your way to say ''back offyou fools?
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2006
As the annual flu season looms, some scientists have this question on their minds: Why now? For more than a century, physicians have recognized that influenza sweeps the Northern Hemisphere during the winter months, typically peaking here between late December and March. Over the years they've floated numerous theories to explain the seasonal flu spike - blaming everything from the flood of frigid air to the wintertime tendency of people to huddle indoors. Yet these explanations "remain astonishingly superficial and full of inconsistencies," says Dr. Scott Dowell, director of the Global Disease Protection Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2005
Bay Theatre Company continues its third season with Harold Pinter's Betrayal - the company's seventh play and the fifth in its intimate 90-seat West Garrett Place playhouse at 275 West St. At a recent rehearsal, Bay Theatre founders Lucinda Merry-Browne and Janet Luby described Betrayal as one of Pinter's more accessible works. Betrayal tells the story of Emma, a woman who has an affair with her husband's best friend, Jerry. The play opens at the end of the affair and works backward. Along the way it illustrates the power of deceit and willful blindness.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 7, 2005
BOSTON - Not long ago, a young actor I know was doing a gig as a waiter. Faced with a truly obnoxious customer, he finally leaned over the table and said theatrically, "Sir, do you realize that I'm going to be spending time alone with your dinner?" This was a memorable moment in the annals of sick humor. But this winter, many of the people spending time alone with your dinner - or huddling around your desk - are just plain sick. A particularly nasty little virus has taken down two members of my family, and brought Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton to the floor in the middle of a speech.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2004
Barely 1 1/2 years after its first play in December 2002, Bay Theatre Company's fifth offering, Anton Chekhov's The Sneeze, establishes the company's reputation for superbly acted, high-quality plays. Co-founders Lucinda Merry-Browne and Janet Luby are adept at selecting small-cast plays that work well in the intimate theater space. Merry-Browne directs six of the seven Sneeze vignettes - with the title one directed by Jim Chance - and she plays supporting roles, while Luby is featured in three of the seven.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
Harford County refinanced some of its debt yesterday in a move that is expected to save the county slightly more than $2 million, though officials said the sale was dampened by the recent upturn in bond market interest rates. The sale, which County Executive James M. Harkins said last month could help jump-start the funding of a middle-high school complex, fell short of expectations as officials elected to pull some bonds from the sale at the last minute. "The interest rates were just not there," said county Treasurer James M. Jewell.
NEWS
By Linda Marsa and Linda Marsa,Special to the Sun | February 3, 2002
As we cough, sneeze and sniff our way through the cold season, it may comfort us to know that technology has finally caught up with our expectations. Two new medicines promise to cure the common cold. The drugs, one of which may be available within the next several months, stop cold viruses in their tracks -- not just mask symptoms, as current remedies do. Patients who have taken them report feeling better almost immediately, sleeping through the night and having to use fewer tissues on the cold's hallmark runny nose.
NEWS
By Lavinia Edmunds | July 8, 2001
THE DAY before the piano recital, "Two for a See-Saw" is disintegrating before my ears, notes running together in a fast slide downhill. My 6-year-old daughter, Emma, is practicing for her first piano recital. When I criticize her, she begins to cry. She doesn't want to play at all. She worries she will forget or will sneeze in the middle of the performance. I opt for gentle coercion, praying I won't turn her off music at this young age. I have been intent on giving my children the gift of a musical education.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2005
Bay Theatre Company continues its third season with Harold Pinter's Betrayal - the company's seventh play and the fifth in its intimate 90-seat West Garrett Place playhouse at 275 West St. At a recent rehearsal, Bay Theatre founders Lucinda Merry-Browne and Janet Luby described Betrayal as one of Pinter's more accessible works. Betrayal tells the story of Emma, a woman who has an affair with her husband's best friend, Jerry. The play opens at the end of the affair and works backward. Along the way it illustrates the power of deceit and willful blindness.
NEWS
August 22, 2001
PRESSURES on the Federal Reserve Board go far beyond U.S. borders. It responded yesterday with a seventh reduction of interest rates this year, and a signal of more in October if economic weakness remains a greater danger than inflation. A few years ago, the Clinton administration was bombarding Japan with advice to stimulate its economy, reduce savings and increase spending by Japanese consumers. The prosperity of Southeast Asia depended on it. Of course, European and Japanese leaders were offering advice to Washington, too. Mostly to end the federal budget deficits.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.