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By Leo Bretholz | March 1, 2014
While it was many years ago, the horrific injustices I experienced during the Holocaust are seared in my brain. I can still recall in explicit detail the atrocities I saw as I was placed in a cattle car bound for a Nazi death camp and as I watched families being separated and possessions taken away. And I cannot forget who was responsible. The train company that tried to send me to Auschwitz was owned and operated by SNCF, a French company that still exists today. SNCF collaborated willingly with the Nazis and was paid per head and per kilometer to transport 76,000 innocent victims - including American pilots shot down over France as well as 11,000 children - across France to death camps like Auschwitz and Buchenwald.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A bill that would block a U.S. subsidiary of the French national railway from bidding to become a partner in a $2.4 billion project because of its role in the Holocaust would put federal funding of the project at "significant risk," the attorney general's office has concluded. In an opinion letter sent Wednesday, General Assembly counsel Dan Friedman told lawmakers that enacting the measure would run afoul of the Federal Transit Administration's rules ensuring open competition among bidders for projects to which it contributes money.
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NEWS
March 5, 2011
As President of the Baltimore Jewish Council, a Holocaust Survivor and someone who testified at this week's Maryland legislative hearings on "Transportation-Procurement for MARC Train Service — Disclosure Requirements Regarding Involvement in Deportations" legislation, I want to applaud Chairman Joan Carter Conway and members of Maryland's Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee, and Chairman Pete Hammen and members of the...
NEWS
March 11, 2014
My wife of 46 years is French, and as a result I have spent a lot of time in France and ridden the SNCF rails in France. I have a brother-in-law who was a SNCF engineer. So seeing the acronym in a recent article, I wondered why someone was publicly singling out French complicity in German-instigated atrocities, especially since the French were not the only Europeans to have done so. Having read Alain Leray's recent commentary, I now see why SNCF has become a subject of such interest ( "SNCF: Holocaust legislation is discriminatory," March 10)
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
A dispute with its roots in the Holocaust will receive a hearing in Annapolis next week as lawmakers consider legislation that could effectively bar an affiliate of the French national railway from bidding on a contract to operate two of the state's three MARC commuter lines. Bills in the House of Delegates and Senate could require SNCF — Société Nationale des Chemins de fer — to make extensive disclosures of records chronicling its role in the transport of Jews and others from France to Nazi death camps during World War II in order for its subsidiary to bid on the contract.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A bill that would block a U.S. subsidiary of the French national railway from bidding to become a partner in a $2.4 billion project because of its role in the Holocaust would put federal funding of the project at "significant risk," the attorney general's office has concluded. In an opinion letter sent Wednesday, General Assembly counsel Dan Friedman told lawmakers that enacting the measure would run afoul of the Federal Transit Administration's rules ensuring open competition among bidders for projects to which it contributes money.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
As policymakers, it is important we acknowledge our limited ability to force actors to behave how we want. What we can do and often attempt is to hold those bad actors accountable when they break the law or act immorally. That is what Leo Bretholz's commentary, "No reparations, no business" (March 1), and House Bill 1326/Senate Bill 754 are all about. Over 70 years ago, the French company SNCF engaged in atrocious behavior, deporting Jews and other minorities to their certain deaths at the hands of their Nazi captors.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
My wife of 46 years is French, and as a result I have spent a lot of time in France and ridden the SNCF rails in France. I have a brother-in-law who was a SNCF engineer. So seeing the acronym in a recent article, I wondered why someone was publicly singling out French complicity in German-instigated atrocities, especially since the French were not the only Europeans to have done so. Having read Alain Leray's recent commentary, I now see why SNCF has become a subject of such interest ( "SNCF: Holocaust legislation is discriminatory," March 10)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Questions of guilt and atonement that are usually the province of historians and moral philosophers arose in Annapolis during hearings Thursday on a bill that would hold a subsidiary of the French national railway responsible for the parent company's role in transporting deportees to death camps under Nazi occupation. Holocaust survivors and their relatives asked Maryland legislators to impose broad disclosure requirements on Keolis America, a Rockville-based company controlled by the French company SNCF, before it can compete for a contract to operate the MARC Camden and Brunswick lines.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2011
Last week a bill came before the General Assembly that could have a profound impact upon the future of two of the three MARC commuter lines. But nobody showed up to speak for the riders. Not the MARC management. Not the Maryland Transit Administration. Not the Maryland Department of Transportation. Neither did a single MARC rider show up. But it's hard to blame them. They'd have to take a day off work to testify — and it's doubtful anyone would have paid much attention anyway.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
By Alain Leray | March 7, 2014
Perhaps the darkest episode in human history, the Holocaust has been at the center of Jewish and world consciousness for over six decades. In the spring of 1940, France was invaded and occupied by Nazi troops. Both my parents and grandparents, who were living in Paris at the time, fled into hiding to survive. During this time, SNCF, the company operating the French railroad system, and the parent company of my current employer, SNCF America, was placed under Nazi command according to Article 13 of the French-German Armistice agreement of June 1940.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
As policymakers, it is important we acknowledge our limited ability to force actors to behave how we want. What we can do and often attempt is to hold those bad actors accountable when they break the law or act immorally. That is what Leo Bretholz's commentary, "No reparations, no business" (March 1), and House Bill 1326/Senate Bill 754 are all about. Over 70 years ago, the French company SNCF engaged in atrocious behavior, deporting Jews and other minorities to their certain deaths at the hands of their Nazi captors.
NEWS
By Leo Bretholz | March 1, 2014
While it was many years ago, the horrific injustices I experienced during the Holocaust are seared in my brain. I can still recall in explicit detail the atrocities I saw as I was placed in a cattle car bound for a Nazi death camp and as I watched families being separated and possessions taken away. And I cannot forget who was responsible. The train company that tried to send me to Auschwitz was owned and operated by SNCF, a French company that still exists today. SNCF collaborated willingly with the Nazis and was paid per head and per kilometer to transport 76,000 innocent victims - including American pilots shot down over France as well as 11,000 children - across France to death camps like Auschwitz and Buchenwald.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2011
Baltimore attorney Aaron Greenfield's work representing Holocaust survivors and their families earned him an invitation last month to join a special committee of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Greenfield, special counsel in the corporate practice group of Duane Morris LLP, was selected after he worked on state legislation requiring firms bidding on commuter rail contracts to disclose whether they had transported Holocaust victims to death camps during World War II. The measure was passed this year by the Maryland General Assembly and signed into law last month.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2011
Last week a bill came before the General Assembly that could have a profound impact upon the future of two of the three MARC commuter lines. But nobody showed up to speak for the riders. Not the MARC management. Not the Maryland Transit Administration. Not the Maryland Department of Transportation. Neither did a single MARC rider show up. But it's hard to blame them. They'd have to take a day off work to testify — and it's doubtful anyone would have paid much attention anyway.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2011
Baltimore attorney Aaron Greenfield's work representing Holocaust survivors and their families earned him an invitation last month to join a special committee of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Greenfield, special counsel in the corporate practice group of Duane Morris LLP, was selected after he worked on state legislation requiring firms bidding on commuter rail contracts to disclose whether they had transported Holocaust victims to death camps during World War II. The measure was passed this year by the Maryland General Assembly and signed into law last month.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
March 5, 2011
As President of the Baltimore Jewish Council, a Holocaust Survivor and someone who testified at this week's Maryland legislative hearings on "Transportation-Procurement for MARC Train Service — Disclosure Requirements Regarding Involvement in Deportations" legislation, I want to applaud Chairman Joan Carter Conway and members of Maryland's Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee, and Chairman Pete Hammen and members of the...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Questions of guilt and atonement that are usually the province of historians and moral philosophers arose in Annapolis during hearings Thursday on a bill that would hold a subsidiary of the French national railway responsible for the parent company's role in transporting deportees to death camps under Nazi occupation. Holocaust survivors and their relatives asked Maryland legislators to impose broad disclosure requirements on Keolis America, a Rockville-based company controlled by the French company SNCF, before it can compete for a contract to operate the MARC Camden and Brunswick lines.
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