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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
I wrote in my first post here on Gay Matters that I wanted readers' help understanding "what it means to be LGBT in Baltimore today," and Jenn Sulin-Stair obliged almost immediately. Jenn sent me a picture of her, her wife Sarah Harding and their two daughters Ryenne and Charlize as they prepared to go out to dinner on a recent night. "We are one of the faces of what it is to be a gay family in Baltimore and we are proud to share our story and proud of WHO we are and our family," Jenn wrote in her email.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
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NEWS
January 20, 1992
The past year has been a tough one for Maryland's economy. Thousands of jobs have been lost in key industries. Retail sales have been depressed. The real estate industry has been in the doldrums and building activity has plummeted in most areas.That's the bad news. The good news is that the worst may be behind us. No one expects a return to the heady growth rates of the 1980s. But state development officials and outside economists are pointing to promising signs that the state's economy may be poised for a turnaround.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Reported robberies in Baltimore for the week ending July 26 rose 11 percent compared with the previous week, according to statistics posted by the city. The incidents include the previously disclosed hold-up of the Harbor East Whole Foods store, as well as another commercial hold-up in the 600 block of E. Pratt St. in the Inner Harbor. There were four robberies reported in Canton and four in Central Park Heights, while data show three people were held up at gunpoint in a single incident in Woodbourne Heights.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 3, 2003
Philip Seymour Hoffman paints a fascinating, and perhaps unique, portrait of addiction in Owning Mahowny. Based on a true incident, Mahowny tells the story of a Toronto assistant bank manager whose real full-time job is gambling addict. And the real magic of Hoffman's performance is that he refuses to make Mahowny anything special, or use histrionics to show the depths of his addiction. This may be the quietest addict ever to hit movie screens, as well the most disturbing. We get no background on Mahowny; screenwriter Maurice Chauvet's script is concerned only with the here and now. This is not a portrait of addiction, but rather a snapshot - a few moments in the life of a man who's given over control of his life to a game of chance, and doesn't even realize he's shortchanging himself.
NEWS
October 26, 2005
BOYS SPORT SOCCER Jesse Ayers, North Carroll STATS -- The Panthers' center-midfielder had seven goals and one assist through the weekend to lead the team in scoring and rank him among the county's leaders. He scored the game-winning goal in the season opener against Frederick, then knocked in the first two goals in a 4-1 win over Tuscarora. SIDELINES -- Coach Denny Snyder calls Ayers "as solid a player as I've ever had" - a comment on his phenomenal foot skills. The senior, a first-team All-County selection last season, sees the field better than most and has one of the hardest shots in the county.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,sun art critic | October 14, 2007
At 58, celebrity portrait photographer Annie Leibovitz seems to have made peace with the choices that led her to a fantastically successful, 35-year career. Though her photos hang in art museums - an exhibition of her work opened this weekend at the Corcoran Gallery of Art - she doesn't seem particularly insistent on claiming everything she does is great art. In Washington last week to promote her show Annie Leibovitz: A Photographer's Life, 1990-2005, she fielded more criticism that the concept - mixing slick images of Demi Moore, Brad Pitt, Queen Elizabeth II, etc. with personal snapshots of family and friends - seemed self-indulgent.
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Staff Writer | July 2, 1993
Clues. By the hundreds. All right there in front of you.That laptop computer balanced on your knees. The Coke bottle in the fridge. The pair of Air Jordans in the closet. The Cadillac cruising down the street. The sound of an electric guitar wailing from the stereo. Snapshots on the hall table. The stack of two-by-fours gathering dust in the basement.Clues, Sherlock. To who we are, where we're going, where we've been.They're everywhere."You may have to do a little mental digging," cautions Phil Patton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 26, 2000
The ultimate criticism of contemporary art, going back at least to the days of Picasso and Matisse, has always been the flummoxed viewer who, his voice rising in indignation, declares: "Why, I could have done that!" Now, a new show at Baltimore's Contemporary Museum has come up with what may be the ultimate riposte to that complaint: "Sure you could have!" "Snapshot," the museum's exhibition of some 1,300 photographs, on display through Jan. 14, demonstrates that sincerity goes a long way toward making up for any shortcomings of skill.
NEWS
By Amy Segreti and Amy Segreti,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
Early Saturday morning, 20 people will hike out to streams across the Jones Falls watershed. And at 9 a.m. - or as close to that time as possible - they will simultaneously dip their test tubes into the water for the second annual "snapshot" of the watershed. "`Snapshot' is like a one-day picture," said Ellen Schmitt, restoration coordinator for the Jones Falls Watershed Association, which works to protect the area through monitoring, advocacy and community awareness. "It's a glimpse of what the entire watershed looks like at a particular day and time."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Bowie Community Theatre has double cause for celebrating its 47th season - a slate of shows and a new home for rehearsals at the city's Kenhill Center. BCT President John Nunemaker says the new location offers adequate rehearsal and workshop space, plus room to grow. Renewing its promise to offer bold, largely undiscovered works, Bowie's current show is R.T. Robinson's "The Cover of Life," a play that had its New York premiere in 1992. In Robinson's World War II-era play, Life magazine gives journalist Kate Miller her first chance at a cover story, focusing on three young wives married to three brothers who moved into their husbands' mother's home after the husbands enlisted.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
I wrote in my first post here on Gay Matters that I wanted readers' help understanding "what it means to be LGBT in Baltimore today," and Jenn Sulin-Stair obliged almost immediately. Jenn sent me a picture of her, her wife Sarah Harding and their two daughters Ryenne and Charlize as they prepared to go out to dinner on a recent night. "We are one of the faces of what it is to be a gay family in Baltimore and we are proud to share our story and proud of WHO we are and our family," Jenn wrote in her email.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
I turned on the TV at noon Wednesday to see how Baltimore stations handled what I was thinking of as fluff: the arrival of the first ships for the Star-Spangled Sailabration. I came away instead impressed with the performance of Baltimore's top two broadcast news operations, WBAL and WJZ, in handling serious breaking news without ignoring the kind of culturally important softer stories that make a city into a community rather than just a TV market. And I was reminded of a largely overlooked truth: Baltimore viewers enjoy some of the best local TV journalism in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
Station North was abuzz with thousands of cinema addicts and more casual moviegoers this past weekend, for the 14th annual Maryland Film Festival. The Festival brought some 100 films and an even higher number of filmmakers to the neighborhood. As always, the Charles Theatre was the hub for the action, which included favorites such as a screening with devious filmmaker John Waters, and newer fare such as a disturbing flick starring a 12-year-old. Festival director Jed Dietz, who's seen attendance at his annual event grow every year, said he was surprised by the adventurousness of the crowd.
SPORTS
By Jim Tomlin, St. Petersburg Times | March 26, 2011
IndyCar launches its 17-race schedule at the Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg Sunday. The teams owned by Chip Ganassi and Roger Penske are expected to dominate the series once again. Drivers to watch Dario Franchitti: Going for his third championship in a row and fourth overall, Ganassi's Franchitti won the title last year by five points over Penske's Will Power and by 55 points over third-place Scott Dixon, Franchitti's teammate. Franchitti won three races last season, including the Indianapolis 500. Power is the defending champion in St. Pete.
NEWS
December 6, 2009
Where we went After consulting with Donald F. Norris, chairman of the public policy department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, the Baltimore Sun dispatched 25 journalists on Thursday to 15 city neighborhoods that, taken together, mirror the racial, gender and age breakdown and median household income of the city as a whole. Information for each was obtained from the Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, which uses Census data. About the interviews Sun journalists sought at least 20 people in each neighborhood representing the demographic composition of that area.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2006
A snapshot of workplace statistics
NEWS
October 1, 1995
In today's Today section, a Sunday snapshot about 14-year-old Megan Leaf incorrectly states the county in which she lives. She is a resident of Harford County.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | jean.marbella@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
I n the market and at the bus stop, over glasses of wine and under the barber's clippers, the daily rhythm of life in Baltimore has been interrupted by a question reverberating through many a conversation: Should Mayor Sheila Dixon, convicted of embezzlement, continue to run the city? With emotions and opinions running the gamut and residents expressing everything from condemnation to support for Dixon, a sampling of 383 residents contacted by The Baltimore Sun found clear leanings: Most of those questioned believe Dixon has done a good job as mayor.
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