Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSnakelight
IN THE NEWS

Snakelight

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 2, 1996
Black & Decker Corp. defeated another foe of its popular SnakeLight when Coleman Co. Inc. said it will stop selling its flexible flashlight and pay the Towson-based company $2.5 million, company officials said yesterday.The agreement settles a patent infringement suit filed by Black & Decker against the camping gear company in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va.Combined with wins in other lawsuits, the settlement means SnakeLight will face little competition this holiday season on store shelves.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 17, 1997
Black & Decker Corp. reported flat quarterly profits yesterday, saying sales failed to keep pace with a year-ago period, when the company's smash-hit SnakeLight was still going strong.Towson-based Black & Decker reported second-quarter net earnings of $45.5 million, or 47 cents per share, compared with $45.3 million, or 47 cents a share, in the year-ago period. For the quarter ended June 29, sales were $1.18 billion, down from $1.21 billion -- a 2.4 percent decline that the company blamed on a stronger dollar in Europe.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1995
Black & Decker Corp., the Towson-based tool and small-appliances manufacturer, has won a federal court injunction barring two competitors from marketing flexible flashlights that are similar to its popular Snakelight.Meanwhile, the company continued its aggressive defense of its market share for the Snakelight -- the company's best-selling product ever -- by adding the Coleman Equipment Co. to a design patent rights infringement suit. That action has been filed against several manufacturers and importers marketing similar flexible flashlights.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Black & Decker Corp.'s quarterly earnings dropped 31 percent, largely because of lower sales of its SnakeLight flexible flashlight and a higher tax rate, the company said yesterday. But the decline was not as steep as analysts had expected, and the outlook not as gloomy. Investors sent Black & Decker shares up $2.25 to $32.125.Net income for the company's first quarter, which ended March 30, was $26.3 million -- down from $38 million in the year-ago period. On a per-share basis, earnings fell to 27 cents from 39 cents.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1996
Black & Decker Corp.'s Snakelight will no longer face competition from the Pretzl Lite marketed by an Owings Mills firm, under an agreement between the two companies disclosed yesterday.The Owings Mills company, Universal Security Instruments Inc., also agreed to pay Black & Decker $300,000 for infringing on its patents for the Snakelight flexible flashlight.Black & Decker has sued several manufacturers and importers marketing flashlights similar to the Snakelight -- a huge hit with consumers since its introduction in November 1994 and the best-selling product in the company's history.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Black & Decker Corp.'s quarterly earnings dropped 31 percent, largely because of lower sales of its SnakeLight flexible flashlight and a higher tax rate, the company said yesterday. But the decline was not as steep as analysts had expected, and the outlook not as gloomy. Investors sent Black & Decker shares up $2.25 to $32.125.Net income for the company's first quarter, which ended March 30, was $26.3 million -- down from $38 million in the year-ago period. On a per-share basis, earnings fell to 27 cents from 39 cents.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
Black & Decker's "Snakelight" will continue to face competition from a Hong Kong company's "flexible flashlight" after a federal jury ruled that the rival wasn't similar enough to the Towson company's product to block sales.But the federal jury in Virginia on Wednesday also ordered the company, GSL Engineering Ltd., to pay Black & Decker $2.17 million because its "Grip Light" design infringed on a patent for Snakelight.Both sides in the case claimed victory.GSL President and Chief Executive Officer George R. Milman called the jury's ruling an "unqualified victory."
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
Black & Decker Corp. has won its second federal jury award in the battle to protect its popular SnakeLight flexible flashlight from rival products.After a weeklong trial in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., the jury late Friday ordered Coleman Co. Inc. to pay Black & Decker $3.7 million for infringing on two SnakeLight patents, said Raymond P. Niro, a patent attorney for the Towson-based company.The jury concluded that two versions of Coleman's Job Pro flashlight violated patents covering the proportion and design of the SnakeLight.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
Two years ago, SnakeLight snared a $100 million market to become Black & Decker Corp.'s most successful product ever.Newscasts told of shortages of the flexible flashlight. Oklahoma City bombing rescue workers ordered them. Television's David Letterman joked that he gave his mother one for Christmas.Now in its third holiday season, SnakeLight faces a problem that befalls every runaway hit. The novelty's gone.That means that SnakeLight has not only lost its cachet, but that it faces another inevitability - copycats who want to seize its flexible flashlight franchise.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1997
Black & Decker Corp. reported flat quarterly profits yesterday, saying sales failed to keep pace with a year-ago period, when the company's smash-hit SnakeLight was still going strong.Towson-based Black & Decker reported second-quarter net earnings of $45.5 million, or 47 cents per share, compared with $45.3 million, or 47 cents a share, in the year-ago period. For the quarter ended June 29, sales were $1.18 billion, down from $1.21 billion -- a 2.4 percent decline that the company blamed on a stronger dollar in Europe.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1997
Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that fourth-quarter net income fell 24.5 percent, a drop that was expected after the company warned last month that it wouldn't meet analysts' expectations.In the quarter that ended Dec. 31, the Towson-based maker of power tools and household appliances faced several rough spots: sagging SnakeLight sales, tough competition for corded power tools, start-up problems in a Brazilian plant and a weak market in the Far East.The company's earnings met the lowered expectations of analysts.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
Two years ago, SnakeLight snared a $100 million market to become Black & Decker Corp.'s most successful product ever.Newscasts told of shortages of the flexible flashlight. Oklahoma City bombing rescue workers ordered them. Television's David Letterman joked that he gave his mother one for Christmas.Now in its third holiday season, SnakeLight faces a problem that befalls every runaway hit. The novelty's gone.That means that SnakeLight has not only lost its cachet, but that it faces another inevitability - copycats who want to seize its flexible flashlight franchise.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1996
Black & Decker Corp. defeated another foe of its popular SnakeLight when Coleman Co. Inc. said it will stop selling its flexible flashlight and pay the Towson-based company $2.5 million, company officials said yesterday.The agreement settles a patent infringement suit filed by Black & Decker against the camping gear company in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va.Combined with wins in other lawsuits, the settlement means SnakeLight will face little competition this holiday season on store shelves.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
Black & Decker Corp. has won its second federal jury award in the battle to protect its popular SnakeLight flexible flashlight from rival products.After a weeklong trial in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., the jury late Friday ordered Coleman Co. Inc. to pay Black & Decker $3.7 million for infringing on two SnakeLight patents, said Raymond P. Niro, a patent attorney for the Towson-based company.The jury concluded that two versions of Coleman's Job Pro flashlight violated patents covering the proportion and design of the SnakeLight.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1996
Black & Decker Corp.'s Snakelight will no longer face competition from the Pretzl Lite marketed by an Owings Mills firm, under an agreement between the two companies disclosed yesterday.The Owings Mills company, Universal Security Instruments Inc., also agreed to pay Black & Decker $300,000 for infringing on its patents for the Snakelight flexible flashlight.Black & Decker has sued several manufacturers and importers marketing flashlights similar to the Snakelight -- a huge hit with consumers since its introduction in November 1994 and the best-selling product in the company's history.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
Black & Decker's "Snakelight" will continue to face competition from a Hong Kong company's "flexible flashlight" after a federal jury ruled that the rival wasn't similar enough to the Towson company's product to block sales.But the federal jury in Virginia on Wednesday also ordered the company, GSL Engineering Ltd., to pay Black & Decker $2.17 million because its "Grip Light" design infringed on a patent for Snakelight.Both sides in the case claimed victory.GSL President and Chief Executive Officer George R. Milman called the jury's ruling an "unqualified victory."
BUSINESS
April 18, 1995
Columbia Gas files planColumbia Gas System Inc. and its pipeline subsidiary filed bankruptcy reorganization plans yesterday to pay $7.5 billion to creditors.Columbia Gas, based in Wilmington, Del., proposed paying some $3.6 billion, of which about $3.4 billion would settle loans. Charleston, W.Va.-based Columbia Gas Transmission Corp. would pay about $3.9 billion, including $2 billion to the parent firm and $1.2 billion to suppliers.A Bankruptcy Court judge, regulators, creditors and shareholders must approve the plan before the utility can emerge from Chapter 11.Travelers' earnings dropTravelers Inc. said yesterday its first-quarter operating income fell 1.3 percent from a year ago as earnings at the company's Smith Barney Inc. unit plunged.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1995
The star at Black & Decker Corp.'s annual meeting yesterday was 28 inches long and had a light bulb in its head.The SnakeLight, the new flexible flashlight, was in the spotlight at the annual meeting of the Towson-based power tool and appliance manufacturer. A runaway best seller, the product is also symbolic of the company's dramatic turnaround in the last year."We hope this is just the beginning of a long period of growth and prosperity for Black & Decker," Noland D. Archibald, chairman and chief executive officer, told about 250 stockholders at the Sheraton Hotel in Towson.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1995
Black & Decker Corp., the Towson-based tool and small-appliances manufacturer, has won a federal court injunction barring two competitors from marketing flexible flashlights that are similar to its popular Snakelight.Meanwhile, the company continued its aggressive defense of its market share for the Snakelight -- the company's best-selling product ever -- by adding the Coleman Equipment Co. to a design patent rights infringement suit. That action has been filed against several manufacturers and importers marketing similar flexible flashlights.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1995
The star at Black & Decker Corp.'s annual meeting yesterday was 28 inches long and had a light bulb in its head.The SnakeLight, the new flexible flashlight, was in the spotlight at the annual meeting of the Towson-based power tool and appliance manufacturer. A runaway best seller, the product is also symbolic of the company's dramatic turnaround in the last year."We hope this is just the beginning of a long period of growth and prosperity for Black & Decker," Noland D. Archibald, chairman and chief executive officer, told about 250 stockholders at the Sheraton Hotel in Towson.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.