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By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | September 2, 2006
Our local lake flooded this spring, and after the water went down, golf-ball-size dead snails lay scattered on the shore. Then I noticed live ones feeding up the creek. In 20 years, I have never seen these snails before. After the Northern snakehead catastrophe, Marylanders know better than to dump exotic pets into local waterways, but citizens always need to be on the alert for new invasive species. Please immediately notify the state Department of Agriculture at 410-841-5700. Let them know that you suspect an invasive species has been introduced into the lake and creek.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A shipment of aluminum sheets from China had to be fumigated at the port of Baltimore this week after a snail species never seen locally before was spotted on the outside of a shipping container, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The Acusta sp. snail species could have posed "a significant agriculture threat because they cause damage by feeding on agricultural and horticultural crops as well as native plants, thereby lowering crop yields and crop quality," CBP officials said Wednesday.
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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | August 15, 2002
Snails are in my wife's garden. They are active throughout the warm months. But it is in late summer when they are much on the march. Forget the "dog days": These are the "snail days." The snails come in the night and eat holes in the green hosta; they mutilate the caladium's delicate, flamingo-pink leaves; they nibble the climbing hydrangea and drain it of its desire to scale the arbor; they chew the blossoms off the impatiens, one of the few spots of bright color in our shady garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | November 9, 2012
So, the big story this episode is Leslie and Ben's engagement party, to which Leslie has invited both of Ben's very estranged parents. Things seem to be going ok after Ben's mom arrives (and is promptly given a glass of wine) but then Ben's dad shows up with his much younger girlfriend, Ulani. Leslie still thinks she can repair everything by revealing the "unity quilt" she's made, with squares to represent friends and family of both her and Ben. But once the quilt is revealed, it only causes more problems as she didn't make a square for Ulani.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1999
Sooner or later every snail farmer has to confront the shocking sex life of his slippery gastropods."Snails are hermaphrodites," says Eddie Chupek, Maryland's only snail farmer and one of about five in the whole country.Being hermaphrodites means, as any kid who's gone to an old-time county fair knows, they have both male and female parts."Essentially," Chupek explains, "[coming] out of the side of their heads they have something called a `spicule,' which is a small white spike. Two snails will get together, next to each other, or head to head, and they exchange these spikes."
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | July 30, 1993
Ruth Schoonover learned that snails eat chalk as a source of calcium for their shells, and Kristine Harrison built a miniature car with Lego pieces.Ruth and Kristine are among 80 girls attending Bryn Mawr School's Summertech program.For 10 years, Bryn Mawr, the private, all-female school in north Baltimore, has conducted the computer and science program for fifth- to eighth-graders. The four-week program ends today.Most of the students come from city schools. Caren Cranston, Summertech's director, said the program aims to introduce the girls to science and computers, areas typically identified with boys.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2001
Like everyone else in Saturday's Comcast Baltimore Marathon, Mary Spinoso will be on new footing for the inaugural running of the race. Spinoso, a 40-year-old massage therapist from Baltimore, has run three Marine Corps marathons, but will be running her first outside Washington. Thanks to the help of the NCR Trail Snails, a loosely formed running group that trains on the converted railroad trail in northern Baltimore County, she figures to be ready. "It's a group that takes in runners of all shapes and sizes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 27, 1996
You'll never squish a gnat with quite the same obliviousness again. After all, he might be somebody's lover.That is the immediate response to "Microcosmos," a stunning documentary that examines life at the ground level in a patch of banally pretty but otherwise nondescript French meadow. At the level of the stalks, the bugs thunder about like saurian lizards, clanking, many-jointed monstrosities out of a nightmare. Snails undulate with the sexuality of mucus-soaked porn stars. Big critters eat little critters and bigger critters still eat them.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
The Orioles put an interesting spin on how they decided the draft order for their annual team fantasy football draft this past weekend - with the help of some Maryland blue crabs. Reliever Darren O'Day wanted to do something more exciting than just picking names out of a hat. At first, O'Day was thinking about having a snail race, but he soon found out snails aren't that easy to purchase. “It's hard to buy them,” O'Day said of the snails. “I was looking out looking in the garden, and I looked down in the harbor because I live right down by the water and I saw crabs everywhere.
NEWS
By USHA LEE MCFARLING and USHA LEE MCFARLING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2006
As she stared down into a wide-mouthed plastic jar aboard the R/V Discoverer, Victoria Fabry peered into the future. The marine snails she was studying - graceful creatures with winglike feet that help them glide through the water - had started to dissolve. Fabry was taken aback. The button-sized snails, called pteropods, are hardy animals that swirl in dense patches in some of the world's coldest seas. In 20 years of studying the snails, a vital ingredient in the polar food supply, the marine biologist from California State University, San Marcos had never seen such damage.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
The Orioles put an interesting spin on how they decided the draft order for their annual team fantasy football draft this past weekend - with the help of some Maryland blue crabs. Reliever Darren O'Day wanted to do something more exciting than just picking names out of a hat. At first, O'Day was thinking about having a snail race, but he soon found out snails aren't that easy to purchase. “It's hard to buy them,” O'Day said of the snails. “I was looking out looking in the garden, and I looked down in the harbor because I live right down by the water and I saw crabs everywhere.
NEWS
November 29, 2009
T he Obama administration has given U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan $5 billion for a "race to the top" fund designed to encourage states to adopt educational innovations that produce major improvements in student achievement. But in the race to take advantage of this federal largesse, Maryland is limping along at a snail's pace compared with the rest of the pack. State schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick hasn't announced a plan to compete for the federal aid, even though the deadline for the first round of applications is less than two months away.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
By now you probably all know what a short sale is: a deal in which the lender allows a home to change hands for less than the balance on the mortgage, forgiving most or all of the difference. For months, real estate agents have said there are far more would-be short sales than closed deals. The lenders reject the offers, or they take so long to consider that buyers give up and move on. Thus I was curious to hear what Olivia Surge, who negotiates short sales on behalf of homeowners at the Law Offices of G. Russell Donaldson in Crofton, is seeing now. Compared with 2007, when nine months could go by before lenders would even look at an offer, "things have gotten much, much better," she said.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | June 14, 2009
When people ask me to recommend a French restaurant in the area, I never think of Crepe du Jour. I didn't realize until I ate there recently how much the Mount Washington creperie, which started as a cart in the Village Square at Cross Keys, had turned into a serious restaurant. OK, not serious, but a French restaurant with good food, not just a place dishing out crepes. Like the other eating places located on this block of Sulgrave Avenue, Crepe du Jour is loaded with lively charm. On a damp, dreary evening, the dining room's vivid colors, tangerine and pumpkin predominantly, immediately cheered us up. The tables are close together, bistro style, with bright tomato-red paisley tablecloths under glass.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | September 2, 2006
Our local lake flooded this spring, and after the water went down, golf-ball-size dead snails lay scattered on the shore. Then I noticed live ones feeding up the creek. In 20 years, I have never seen these snails before. After the Northern snakehead catastrophe, Marylanders know better than to dump exotic pets into local waterways, but citizens always need to be on the alert for new invasive species. Please immediately notify the state Department of Agriculture at 410-841-5700. Let them know that you suspect an invasive species has been introduced into the lake and creek.
NEWS
By USHA LEE MCFARLING and USHA LEE MCFARLING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2006
As she stared down into a wide-mouthed plastic jar aboard the R/V Discoverer, Victoria Fabry peered into the future. The marine snails she was studying - graceful creatures with winglike feet that help them glide through the water - had started to dissolve. Fabry was taken aback. The button-sized snails, called pteropods, are hardy animals that swirl in dense patches in some of the world's coldest seas. In 20 years of studying the snails, a vital ingredient in the polar food supply, the marine biologist from California State University, San Marcos had never seen such damage.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2002
OCEAN LIFE EXHIBITS by Stacey Gruber's pupils transformed their fourth-grade classroom at Hampstead Elementary into a model aquarium last week. Inviting families for a look was the final part of Ocean Exhibit WebQuest, designed by media teacher Iva Martin to encourage kids to explore the Internet and print media for facts that they could turn into exhibits to teach other children. This was the first public view of how the school's wireless laptop lab enabled the 9-year-old pupils to conduct research online for 13 unusual sea creatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | November 9, 2012
So, the big story this episode is Leslie and Ben's engagement party, to which Leslie has invited both of Ben's very estranged parents. Things seem to be going ok after Ben's mom arrives (and is promptly given a glass of wine) but then Ben's dad shows up with his much younger girlfriend, Ulani. Leslie still thinks she can repair everything by revealing the "unity quilt" she's made, with squares to represent friends and family of both her and Ben. But once the quilt is revealed, it only causes more problems as she didn't make a square for Ulani.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 29, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- Suffering from colorectal cancer, Tom McAuliffe was in such pain that he had to sleep standing up, propped against a couch. Now he can rest easier, thanks to a new pain medicine derived from an unlikely source: the venom of a snail from a coral reef off the Philippines. When the drug received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration in December, it was believed to be the first time the agency has approved a medicine that is an exact copy of a chemical found in the ocean.
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