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By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The recipe is familiar, but with a fresh twist. Mix the salty, crunchy goodness of traditional munchies with the spicy kick reminiscent of Maryland's steamed crabs - and add the power of several professional Baltimore athletes for good measure - and you've got a new line of snacks with hometown flavor. Crab-inspired cheese curls, buttery popcorn and sunflower seeds are some of the product offerings from Home Team Snacks, headquartered in Carroll County. Launched in 2012, the company is the brainchild of Marc Heyman and Jeff Hinton, 49-year-old Baltimore-area natives who grew up in Mount Washington and Catonsville, respectively.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The recipe is familiar, but with a fresh twist. Mix the salty, crunchy goodness of traditional munchies with the spicy kick reminiscent of Maryland's steamed crabs - and add the power of several professional Baltimore athletes for good measure - and you've got a new line of snacks with hometown flavor. Crab-inspired cheese curls, buttery popcorn and sunflower seeds are some of the product offerings from Home Team Snacks, headquartered in Carroll County. Launched in 2012, the company is the brainchild of Marc Heyman and Jeff Hinton, 49-year-old Baltimore-area natives who grew up in Mount Washington and Catonsville, respectively.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new fat substitute Olestra yesterday for use in such salty-type snack foods as potato chips and crackers, a decision that is likely to open the door to future uses in a wide range of foods.While Olestra has the taste and texture of fat, it adds no fat or calories. However, it also has been associated with some unpleasant side effects, including abdominal cramping, diarrhea-like symptoms and the depletion of important nutrients from the body.
HEALTH
By Bailey Shiffler, For The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
After battling stomach problems for years, Sarah Croessmann took action. On the advice of her doctor, she tried eating fewer fats, then removing dairy. Four years ago, she hit on a winner: She cut gluten from her diet. Croessmann, a 25-year-old Baltimore resident, is one of 1.6 million Americans on gluten-free diets who have not been diagnosed with celiac disease, according to a recent study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Celiac disease is triggered by the gluten found in wheat, barley, rye and possibly oats, which causes an autoimmune reaction and can lead to damage to the small intestine.
NEWS
By Allure magazine | March 30, 2003
Nearly 18 percent of the calories consumed by Americans come from snack foods, including candy, chips and soda.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff writer | May 10, 1992
Frito-Lay Inc. says Maryland's new tax on snack foods won't delay the opening of its Aberdeen manufacturing plant, but the tax may force the company to hire fewer workers for it.Robbi Dietrich, director of government affairs for Frito-Lay, based in Plano, Texas, said it might employ fewer people than originally planned if sales are "dramatically" affected."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
The Maryland Senate approved a $23.6 billion state budget yesterday that taps reserve accounts for hundreds of millions of dollars and imposes a sales tax on salty snack foods. The House of Delegates, meanwhile, is embarking on a different direction that could include a 1-cent sales tax increase or a surcharge on the state's wealthiest residents. House Democrats plan to meet Monday in an effort to reach consensus on taxes needed to close a projected budget gap and pay for a landmark public schools program.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1994
With four days to go until Tuesday's primary, Republican gubernatorial candidate Helen Delich Bentley yesterday unveiled her plan to help small business, calling for the repeal of the state's so-called snack tax, which she said causes too much confusion for store owners.Mrs. Bentley, a five-term member of Congress, also called for a review of state regulations to make them more business-friendly, creation of an ombudsman's position to help small business navigate the bureaucracy and the scaling back of state regulations that go beyond what the federal government requires.
NEWS
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
More than 15 percent of American children are overweight, and that percentage is growing, according to the National Institutes of Health. One way parents can improve the health of their children is to offer nutritious, kid-pleasing options for meals and snacks, including school lunches. Oldways Preservation Trust, a think tank that promotes healthful eating, has a new printable school lunch planner on its Web site, www.oldwayspt .org, to help parents pack more creative, better-tasting nutritious lunches.
HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Rachel Ernzen weighs in on bad habits. Information about the relationship between food and health abounds in newspapers, magazines, books, TV and Internet. Foods have become more readily available and portion sizes have grown, but we lead more sedentary daily lives.
HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Rachel Ernzen weighs in on bad habits. Information about the relationship between food and health abounds in newspapers, magazines, books, TV and Internet. Foods have become more readily available and portion sizes have grown, but we lead more sedentary daily lives.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | December 11, 2005
Howard County residents weighed in on the battle of the bulge last week when the Board of Education heard two hours of testimony about a proposed nutrition plan that would essentially ban high-sugar, high-fat snack foods in vending machines and at school functions. About 30 people testified Thursday night and shared concerns ranging from childhood obesity issues connected to a less restrictive policy to the potential revenue loss linked to the proposed plan - which has been called one of the most strict in the country.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
No candy, no brownies, no barbecue-flavored chips, no junk. Moving to meet new state guidelines, school systems are cooking up tougher nutrition policies that - in Baltimore City and Howard County, at least - would do away with high-sugar, high-fat snack foods in vending machines and even at booster club concession stands. The push for such nutrition standards is being driven by national concerns about childhood obesity - the percentage of children who are overweight has more than doubled since 1980, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | September 5, 2004
Vibrations from the heavy machines made the floor beneath our feet rumble. Through the plate-glass windows, we could see giant machines at work, sprinkling salt on potato chips and weighing pretzels before they were placed in bags. Our guide at the Snyder's of Hanover factory in Hanover, Pa., Chris Long, showered us with facts and tidbits as we watched the high-tech process of creating snack foods. We learned, for example, that Snyder's has about 1,000 employees and that the journey from raw flour to finished pretzel takes about 45 minutes.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
The Maryland Senate approved a $23.6 billion state budget yesterday that taps reserve accounts for hundreds of millions of dollars and imposes a sales tax on salty snack foods. The House of Delegates, meanwhile, is embarking on a different direction that could include a 1-cent sales tax increase or a surcharge on the state's wealthiest residents. House Democrats plan to meet Monday in an effort to reach consensus on taxes needed to close a projected budget gap and pay for a landmark public schools program.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | September 7, 2003
I HAD ALWAYS considered corn dogs the lowest food on the food chain -- until I watched an episode of Unwrapped and learned that corn dogs are almost health food. I never lost sleep wondering how many licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop or how they make Pop Rocks pop in your mouth. But that kind of junk information about junk food is on the menu at Unwrapped, on the Food Network every Monday night at 9. "We did a segment on chocolate," recalls host Marc Summers. "And we talked about 'hot' chocolate -- chocolate made with hot peppers.
HEALTH
By Bailey Shiffler, For The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
After battling stomach problems for years, Sarah Croessmann took action. On the advice of her doctor, she tried eating fewer fats, then removing dairy. Four years ago, she hit on a winner: She cut gluten from her diet. Croessmann, a 25-year-old Baltimore resident, is one of 1.6 million Americans on gluten-free diets who have not been diagnosed with celiac disease, according to a recent study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Celiac disease is triggered by the gluten found in wheat, barley, rye and possibly oats, which causes an autoimmune reaction and can lead to damage to the small intestine.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | September 5, 2004
Vibrations from the heavy machines made the floor beneath our feet rumble. Through the plate-glass windows, we could see giant machines at work, sprinkling salt on potato chips and weighing pretzels before they were placed in bags. Our guide at the Snyder's of Hanover factory in Hanover, Pa., Chris Long, showered us with facts and tidbits as we watched the high-tech process of creating snack foods. We learned, for example, that Snyder's has about 1,000 employees and that the journey from raw flour to finished pretzel takes about 45 minutes.
NEWS
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2003
More than 15 percent of American children are overweight, and that percentage is growing, according to the National Institutes of Health. One way parents can improve the health of their children is to offer nutritious, kid-pleasing options for meals and snacks, including school lunches. Oldways Preservation Trust, a think tank that promotes healthful eating, has a new printable school lunch planner on its Web site, www.oldwayspt .org, to help parents pack more creative, better-tasting nutritious lunches.
NEWS
By Allure magazine | March 30, 2003
Nearly 18 percent of the calories consumed by Americans come from snack foods, including candy, chips and soda.
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