Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSmokers
IN THE NEWS

Smokers

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
January 12, 2012
Editor: Regarding the letter by Phil Brainard, of Aberdeen, in response to my previous letter entitled "Steaming Over Smoking Ban," thank you for your rebuttal. That's the way democracy is supposed to work. I do,however have to take issue with some of your comments. I cannot speak for every smoker in this county, as far as whether they take their expended butt with them when they are finished their cigarette, but I personally, do not throw my butt on the ground. Instead I will look for a trash can in which to deposit it. If such a container is not available, I will take it to my car where I keep a trash bag for just this type of useage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 18, 2014
Carroll Hospital Center is joining Anne Arundel Medical Center and other health systems, businesses and employers who won't hire people who smoke cigarettes or use other nicotine products. Carroll announced the policy Thursday, and it expands on a policy that bans use of tobacco products on campus. The expanded ban is expected to begin in January. Nicotine causes a wide range of health problems and is the leading cause of preventable death, hospital officials said, and is not part of the healthy lifestyle they are trying to promote.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 4, 2010
Unbelievable! Cigarettes already have a $20 per carton state tax and a $10 per carton federal tax. An additional 6 percent state sales tax is added on top of these. Yet here we have The Sun printing an opinion piece by Vincent DeMarco, president of the Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative, urging further increases in cigarette taxes ("Cigarette tax boosts budget, health," Feb. 3). It would appear no excess is too great when doing the work of the righteous. Cigarette smokers have been taxed quite enough.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
I'm not a cigarette smoker, although I did try to get myself addicted when I was a kid. I smoked Camel no filters for a year but I never liked them. They stank, they tasted bad and the "high" was terrible - if you can call wanting to throw up a "high. " I eventually gave them up out of disgust, and I still can't stand the smell. In fact, I can't think of anything good to say about tobacco at all. But having said all that, I still have to stand up for the rights of smokers to kill themselves if they want to. When I read in your paper that some employers will not hire smokers, that's going way to far ( "In Maryland, smoking could cost you job," July 5)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 18, 2014
Carroll Hospital Center is joining Anne Arundel Medical Center and other health systems, businesses and employers who won't hire people who smoke cigarettes or use other nicotine products. Carroll announced the policy Thursday, and it expands on a policy that bans use of tobacco products on campus. The expanded ban is expected to begin in January. Nicotine causes a wide range of health problems and is the leading cause of preventable death, hospital officials said, and is not part of the healthy lifestyle they are trying to promote.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
So you're a wreck as you fly from Baltimore to Boston, unable to take a single puff. Relax. Smokers Express Airlines may be coming this way.Dozens of small carriers start up each year, hoping to find a niche in the fiercely competitive airline industry. And the Florida-based Smokers Express has got a gimmick designed to lure disgruntled puffers who're forced by federal law to extinguish their smokes on nearly all domestic flights.By operating as a club, Smokers Express, just like charter flights, would be exempt from federal regulations that prohibit smoking on domestic flights six hours or less.
NEWS
By GREGOY P. KANE | August 24, 1994
I'd like to pass on some advice to smokers on the subject of smokers' rights.Smokers' rights don't exist. They never have. They never will. The notion is a fantasy spawned by the current American frenzy in which everyone has rights and no one has responsibilities.I challenge you to find a passage in the U.S. Constitution that explicitly refers to "smokers' rights." You won't find it. I challenge you to find a passage in the document that even obliquely implies the existence of "smokers' rights."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Timothy J. Mullaney contributed to this article | February 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge in New Orleans agreed yesterday to let tens of millions of smokers link up in a blockbuster lawsuit that seeks billions of dollars in damages on a new but simple claim: that the industry intentionally makes cigarettes addictive to destroy smokers' ability to quit.The single-case approach, which is deeply threatening to tobacco companies, is a key part of the strategy of some of the nation's most successful law firms, joining forces to try to best an industry that up to now has fought off almost all the legal claims of smokers.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 22, 2007
Want to get out of jury duty? Take up smoking. U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz has suggested keeping smokers off the jury in the Tommy Bromwell RICO case. His concern: Jurors stepping outside the courthouse for smoke breaks might overhear conversations among all the spectators and journalists swarming around the high-profile trial. "It's just a potential risk. It's just something to think about," Motz told me. Motz said he got the idea from another judge he met at a conference.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | November 20, 1991
For 19 years, Kim has been smoking a pack a day. Now, the Finksburg resident and mother of two wants to kick the cigarette habit."I would like to feel better physically," she said. "Activities like biking or playing tennis cause me to have shortness of breath. If I quit,I could be more active."Tomorrow, Kim and many smokers nationwide will put aside their tobacco for 24 hours as part of the American Cancer Society's 15th annual Great American Smokeout."Basically, the goal of the smoke-out is to show the smoker that if they can quit for 24 hours, they can quit permanently," said Kirsten Moore, a health education intern for the county Health Department.
NEWS
By Isaac Howley | June 25, 2014
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on the harms of smoking, which launched anti-tobacco public health efforts that have saved an estimated 8 million American lives. We are today a far more educated public when it comes to the dangers of cigarette use. Yet a bill in the Maryland House of Delegates that would treat e-cigarettes like normal cigarettes, and thus ban their use in public buildings, was roundly defeated this year. The bill didn't even make it out of committee.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 20, 2014
Anne Arundel Medical Center has adopted a new policy that prohibits use of all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. And next year, the hospital plans to stop hiring anyone who uses tobacco products. The hospital has banned cigarette smoking on campus since 2007, like many hospitals, but the new policy in effect July 1 was expanded to include the smokeless products. And there will be no designated smoking areas in garages or on sidewalks. The policy applies to staff, as well as vendors and visitors.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
Opening day 2014 last week was a blast ("Opening Day is magic for fans as weather breaks and Orioles win," March 31). My husband and I went with our son and daughter-in-law, and we will come again to other games with our grandchildren, ages 4, 5 and 13. On Monday, there were two boys who were about 10 sitting two rows away who craned their necks each time the adults in the row between us "lit up" their electronic cigarettes. The boys were clearly being exposed to something new, judging from their staring and gesticulations.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
It's been half a century since the first U.S. surgeon general's report appeared linking smoking to lung cancer. In the decades that followed, federal and state health officials waged a vigorous public information and education campaign that convinced millions of Americans to kick the habit. But as a new surgeon general's report this month warned, smoking remains the leading cause of preventable deaths in the U.S., and its health consequences for individuals are even more lethal than previously believed.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
The air is alive with perhaps a dozen sweet scents at Kahuna Vapor in Ellicott City, customers adding to the aroma with every vaporous exhalation. They're not smoking. They're "vaping" - using a battery-powered electronic cigarette that heats flavored liquid nicotine into a vapor users can inhale. Such stores are popping up fast nationwide, quadrupling in the last year alone to about 3,000, according to an estimate by the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association. Kahuna Vapor, one of at least three to open locally in the last two months, opened a storefront soon after starting as an online business making local deliveries.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
The best way to prevent people from smoking is keeping kids from starting. Why not just make the age to smoke 25? That way it would be illegal to smoke at least in public. Banning smoking indoors has really helped. I am so glad that if I go to a tavern for something to eat and drink that I don't have to endure smokers. That was one of the smartest things we've ever done. Now change the law and you won't have kids starting early. If you don't think it's necessary, just ride past Catonsville High at dismissal and see all the kids smoking when they leave the campus.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | December 11, 1990
The chained, 15-foot statue is a look-alike of the Statue of Liberty, except for a cigarette in her raised right hand and a giant pack of cigarettes under her left arm."This is Lady Nicotina," said T.R. Neslund, executive director for the International Commission for the Prevention of Alcoholism and Drug Dependency. "Nicotine is the drug that addicts you; that's what puts you in slavery."Lady Nicotina stood outside the Convention Center yesterday as anti-smokers protested the sponsorship of the Bill of Rights tour by Philip Morris Co. Inc., the nation's largest cigarette manufacturer.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 4, 1993
Rosalie Sugalski understands all about smokers' rights."I remember how important it was to me to have those couple of drags," said Ms. Sugalski, 55, once a three-pack-a-day smoker.But 12 years ago, a diagnosis of lung cancer scared her into quitting -- cold turkey. In a long operation, a piece of her lung was removed."After that, I couldn't even think about a cigarette," she said, sitting in the cozy living room of her rowhouse tucked neatly behind a white picket fence in Conshohocken, Pa.Lately, though, Ms. Sugalski said she has thought a lot about cigarettes -- specifically, the steady stream of secondhand smoke she inhales daily at her place of work, Markel Inc., a Norristown, Pa.-area manufacturer of insulation products with about 160 employees.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
Much as Americans hate taxes and tax increases, there's at least one levy even the government wishes people wouldn't pay. That's the tax on cigarettes, which the government dearly wishes people would avoid. When it come to cigarettes, a tax is its way of encouraging smokers to keep their money in their pockets by quitting, and a report this week from a coalition of health advocacy groups suggests the strategy is working. According to a study released this week by the Citizens' Health Initiative, sales of cigarettes in Maryland have declined dramatically since 2008, when lawmakers raised the state tax on tobacco by a dollar.
NEWS
By Patrick D. Hahn | March 28, 2013
Anyone who wants to know why health care costs continue to soar need look no further than the recent recommendation by the American Cancer Society that current and former heavy smokers discuss lung cancer screening with their doctors. The guidelines were based on the National Lung Screening Trial, which found that three spiral CT scans given over three years reduced lung cancer deaths by 20 percent. The New York Times called the finding "an enormous advance in cancer detection. " A 20 percent reduction in deaths sounds pretty good.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.