Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSmokeless Tobacco
IN THE NEWS

Smokeless Tobacco

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 2012
I was dismayed by the letter written by Brad Rodu minimizing the devastating health consequences caused by using smokeless tobacco products ("All tobacco is not equally harmful," Jan. 24). Dr. Rodu is a dentist and scientist at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center. He receives funding from the tobacco industry and promotes the false virtues of chewing tobacco, snuff and other smokeless tobacco products. A quick Google search reveals he has been carrying the tobacco industry's water for more than 20 years now. Contrary to Dr. Rodu's statements, regular use of smokeless tobacco products can lead to the presence of oral cancer within an alarmingly swift five years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Professional baseball great Tony Gwynn Sr., also known as Mr. Padre, died last month of salivary gland cancer, which he believed was caused by years of using smokeless chewing tobacco. The cancer is a rare form that begins in any of the salivary glands in the mouth, neck or throat. Two adults in 100,000 are diagnosed with salivary gland cancer each year. The chances of survival drop if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. Dr. Patrick K. Ha, with Johns Hopkins Head and Neck Surgery at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, says new types of treatments and therapies are in the works to treat the disease.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 17, 2012
A special session of the legislature is definitely needed to prevent the disastrous "doomsday budget" from taking effect - but it is also needed to enact the life-saving tobacco tax increase, which like the proposed income tax increase failed to gain final General Assembly approval by midnight on April 9. The House and Senate revenue conferees had agreed that the tax on little cigars should be increased from its very low present rate of 15 percent...
NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Mickey Mantle looked pretty good, better than he has looked in years. He has not had a drink in about nine months, and his face has lost that haggard look.Back in April, he had said: "I still can't remember much of the last 10 years, but from what I've been told, I really don't want those memories."Yesterday, he talked about some things he did remember.As he spoke, Hank Aaron looked on, getting ready for his turn. Aaron looks terrific. He may be a pound or two over his playing weight, but he carries it well.
NEWS
By Valerie Reitman and Valerie Reitman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 21, 2004
A growing number of anti-smoking researchers and public health advocates are adopting a tactic that not long ago would have been considered heresy: saying that hard-core smokers who can't kick the habit would be better off switching to new smokeless tobacco products. With slogans such as "Spit-free" and "For when you can't smoke," these products differ markedly from the messy snuff and chewing tobacco stereotypes associated with your granddad's spittoon or pro baseball players' stuffed cheeks.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
Leaders in both houses of the General Assembly are backing a tax change on a product known as moist snuff that is being pushed by tobacco giant Philip Morris - and opposed by an unusual coalition of other tobacco interests and health advocates. Lobbyist Bruce Bereano, representing the Maryland Association of Tobacco & Candy Distributors, grinned Tuesday at finding himself on the same side as the American Cancer Society. "In the 36 years I've been lobbying for the tobacco industry, this is a first," Bereano said.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
NEWS
By Carter Beach | April 16, 2010
This year, millions of people will watch the Orioles at Camden Yards or on TV. We can't know whether the O's will win or lose, but there's at least one thing every baseball fan can be sure of witnessing: spit tobacco use. Baseball has always been a numbers game. Fans everywhere know their favorite players' batting averages and earned run averages. Here in Baltimore, the number 2,632 — Cal Ripken's record for consecutive games played — is etched in many minds. Well, how about these numbers?
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In response to the recent letter defending smokeless tobacco use ("All tobacco products are not equally harmful," Jan. 24), the risk of tobacco trumps all others. Fifty cigarettes a day increases the risk of end-stage lung disease and lung cancer 150-fold. This is orders of magnitude worse than other modifiable risk factors like weight, aerobic capacity blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose level. Even if smokeless tobacco is responsible for only 2 percent of tobacco deaths, we cannot accept thousands of deaths instead of over 450,000 deaths a year in America.
NEWS
May 28, 2014
We at the Maryland Health Care For All Coalition, representing hundreds of faith, community, labor, business and health care groups from across Maryland, hope that when Attorney General Doug Gansler and the Republican candidates for governor criticize the "40 new taxes" enacted under the O'Malley administration they are not including in their criticism the life saving tobacco and alcohol tax increases approved in 2007, 2011 and 2012. The one-dollar per pack cigarette tax increase enacted in 2007, which Attorney General Gansler supported, has helped to reduce cigarette smoking by 32 percent in Maryland, almost double the national average, and by 40 percent among teens.
NEWS
August 7, 2012
A recent article on tobacco use pointed out that although cigarette smoking has gone down nationally, the use of cigars and other non-cigarette tobacco products has gone up over the past few years ("Cigarette use down, other tobacco up, CDC says," Aug. 3). A recent study of Maryland youth tobacco use reported a similar troubling trend - while fewer kids are getting addicted to cigarettes (thanks to our smoke-free air laws and tax increases), more kids are smoking cheap flavored cigars that are just as detrimental to their health.
NEWS
April 17, 2012
A special session of the legislature is definitely needed to prevent the disastrous "doomsday budget" from taking effect - but it is also needed to enact the life-saving tobacco tax increase, which like the proposed income tax increase failed to gain final General Assembly approval by midnight on April 9. The House and Senate revenue conferees had agreed that the tax on little cigars should be increased from its very low present rate of 15 percent...
NEWS
March 26, 2012
The House of Delegates' rewrite of next year's state budget takes some important steps toward making Maryland's finances sustainable without dipping quite so deeply into taxpayers' pockets as the Senate's plan. It's not perfect, and some details will still need to be ironed out in negotiations between the two chambers, but it appears to be heading in the right direction. Here's what remains to be decided in the weeks ahead: • Income taxes. The House has drastically scaled back the income tax increases in the Senate's plan and focused the burden more exclusively on those at the upper end of the income scale - without the creation of a problematic "super-bracket" for those who make more than $500,000 a year.
NEWS
January 31, 2012
I was dismayed by the letter written by Brad Rodu minimizing the devastating health consequences caused by using smokeless tobacco products ("All tobacco is not equally harmful," Jan. 24). Dr. Rodu is a dentist and scientist at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center. He receives funding from the tobacco industry and promotes the false virtues of chewing tobacco, snuff and other smokeless tobacco products. A quick Google search reveals he has been carrying the tobacco industry's water for more than 20 years now. Contrary to Dr. Rodu's statements, regular use of smokeless tobacco products can lead to the presence of oral cancer within an alarmingly swift five years.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In response to the recent letter defending smokeless tobacco use ("All tobacco products are not equally harmful," Jan. 24), the risk of tobacco trumps all others. Fifty cigarettes a day increases the risk of end-stage lung disease and lung cancer 150-fold. This is orders of magnitude worse than other modifiable risk factors like weight, aerobic capacity blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose level. Even if smokeless tobacco is responsible for only 2 percent of tobacco deaths, we cannot accept thousands of deaths instead of over 450,000 deaths a year in America.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber | March 8, 1991
Call this strike one against smokeless tobacco.The summer game's chew of choice was banned in the lowest minor leagues yesterday by Commissioner Fay Vincent. Baseball's first-ever tobacco ban covers all parks in four rookie and short-season Class A leagues of the National Association."This action is part of baseball's overall strategy to educate our players to the health risks associated with the use of smokeless tobacco and to disassociate the game from its use," Mr. Vincent said in a news release issued from the baseball owners meetings in Irving, Texas.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 17, 2006
The concept behind vaccines must have sounded suicidal when it was first proposed: You protect yourself against smallpox by infecting yourself with smallpox? The thinking behind a new approach to smoking may likewise sound lunatic: The surest cure for tobacco use is tobacco use. But at this point in the fight against cigarettes, maybe a crazy idea is worth a try. Everyone knows smoking is deadly, killing more than 400,000 Americans a year. The American Cancer Society predicts that, given prevailing trends, more than a billion people around the world will die of smoking-related illnesses in the 21st century.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 19, 2012
 Most states, including Maryland, are not doing enough to protect the public from tobacco or prevent related disease, according to the latest assessment from the American Lung Association due out today. In its 10 th annual State of Tobacco Control Report Card , the group gave praise to the Obama administration for offering treatments to federal employees, putting graphic pictures on cigarettes packs and advertising its 1-800-QUIT-NOW line. But the group said the tobacco companies are taking advantage of the states' lax policies by spending billions to market cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products.
NEWS
By Carter Beach | April 16, 2010
This year, millions of people will watch the Orioles at Camden Yards or on TV. We can't know whether the O's will win or lose, but there's at least one thing every baseball fan can be sure of witnessing: spit tobacco use. Baseball has always been a numbers game. Fans everywhere know their favorite players' batting averages and earned run averages. Here in Baltimore, the number 2,632 — Cal Ripken's record for consecutive games played — is etched in many minds. Well, how about these numbers?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.