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Smoke Signals

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By Noelle Carter and Tribune Newspapers | April 5, 2010
There's a primal wonder to smoked food — that such depth of flavor can come from so simple a technique. And then, of course, there's the lure of the sunny afternoon spent in a lawn chair with a cold beer while you're waiting, patiently, for the Weber to work its magic. But what if it starts raining? The audacity of the weather! Of course, not all smoking needs to be done outdoors. Find a large roasting pan. Grab a cooling rack, some heavy foil and a baking tin for a makeshift drip container.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Noelle Carter and Tribune Newspapers | April 5, 2010
There's a primal wonder to smoked food — that such depth of flavor can come from so simple a technique. And then, of course, there's the lure of the sunny afternoon spent in a lawn chair with a cold beer while you're waiting, patiently, for the Weber to work its magic. But what if it starts raining? The audacity of the weather! Of course, not all smoking needs to be done outdoors. Find a large roasting pan. Grab a cooling rack, some heavy foil and a baking tin for a makeshift drip container.
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NEWS
June 22, 1993
Do we detect a whiff of political positioning in Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's decision not to sue the state over inadequate school funds? Is Mr. Schmoke edging ever-closer to running for governor? Or do these smoke signals indicate the mayor simply wants to cut the best deal for Baltimore City on increased state support for city schools?Both options might be part of the mayor's strategy. By shelving the lawsuit, Mr. Schmoke clears the deck of a potential hazard to his gubernatorial ambitions. When the mayor said last year he wanted the courts to order the state to spend more money on poor school districts, he generated tremendous animus in influential Montgomery County, the state's biggest and wealthiest subdivision.
FEATURES
By DANIEL FIENBERG and DANIEL FIENBERG,ZAP2IT.COM | June 2, 2006
LOS ANGELES-- --As most people with access to even rudimentary technology - smoke signals, telegraph - have already heard, Jennifer Aniston separated from husband Brad Pitt back in January 2005 and promptly turned around and signed on for a not-so-romantic comedy titled The Break-Up. "Well, yeah, it's pretty ironic," Aniston says now, when the subject is broached. "You know, at the time it was something I thought about. You know, you kind of can't believe when I first got the call that a movie called The Break-Up is coming.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 17, 1998
"Smoke Signals" may be the most delightfully quirky surprise of the summer, a shaggy-dog tale that from its opening moments the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation portrays the Native American legacy of pride and pain with deep emotion, grace and irreverence.Fans of novelist Sherman Alexie will be gratified that the first feature adaptation of his work so faithfully captures his humor and poetic language. And movie fans in general will be thrilled to meet so many new voices and faces on this enchanting and unexpectedly affecting journey.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 23, 1998
It's official. "There's Something About Mary," the gross-out comedy starring Ben Stiller and Cameron Diaz, is the sleeper hit of the summer, taking on a mantle that "My Best Friend's Wedding" wore last summer and "Babe" the summer before that.Sleepers - big hits that seem to come out of nowhere, taking film studios, critics and audiences alike by surprise - now seem to be staples of the summer movie season, on a par with the biggest explosions and the most humiliating bomb. But in an age when marketing and publicity are manipulated to within a hair's breadth - when there are computer programs that predict a film's box-office performance before the cameras even start running - is such a thing as an authentic sleeper even possible?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The economy's good. The audiences are more adventurous. The distributors are scrounging for product. And the success stories are coming one after the other.Yes, says Chris Eyre, it's a great day to be an independent filmmaker.Eyre should know. As the director of last year's art-house hit "Smoke Signals," starring Adam Beach and Evan Adams as a pair of Coeur d'Alene Indians on a road trip that reveals a lot of what it means to be a Native American in the 1990s, he's spent the last year basking in the glow that only success can bring.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 19, 1998
Cinema Sundays, the film lovers' series at the Charles Theatre, wraps up its 12th season Sunday with a screening of "Smoke Signals," a film by Sherman Alexie and Chris Eyre that opens in Baltimore in July.This coming-of-age tale follows two young Native American men as they travel from their reservation in the Pacific Northwest to Arizona, where one of them will recover the remains of his late father.The touching and funny film, which was a hit at this year's Sundance Film Festival, will be introduced by WJHU radio host Marc Steiner.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
Smoking ban isn't a partisan problem The Sun's editorial "Smoke signals" (Feb. 16) suggests that Maryland Democrats should seize the restaurant and bar smoking ban issue to help move the legislation through the State House and get the support of voters who back the idea. To support this recipe for victory, the editorial serves up a hearty list of other states and jurisdictions that ban smoking, sprinkles in some data about second-hand smoke and adds just a pinch of the notion that Maryland voters "overwhelmingly support" a smoking ban (without identifying the source of such polls)
TOPIC
April 17, 2005
LOOKING FORWARD Monday More than 100 members of the College of Cardinals will begin meeting to select a successor to Pope John Paul II behind closed doors in the Vatican's Sistine Chapel. Starting that afternoon, the cardinals will send up smoke signals from the burned ballot papers of the vote to indicate whether they have found a successor. Black smoke means no pope has been elected; white smoke signals a new pope. Tuesday A memorial service will mark the 10th anniversary of the terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building that killed 168 people and injured more than 500 others in Oklahoma City.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
Smoking ban isn't a partisan problem The Sun's editorial "Smoke signals" (Feb. 16) suggests that Maryland Democrats should seize the restaurant and bar smoking ban issue to help move the legislation through the State House and get the support of voters who back the idea. To support this recipe for victory, the editorial serves up a hearty list of other states and jurisdictions that ban smoking, sprinkles in some data about second-hand smoke and adds just a pinch of the notion that Maryland voters "overwhelmingly support" a smoking ban (without identifying the source of such polls)
TOPIC
April 17, 2005
LOOKING FORWARD Monday More than 100 members of the College of Cardinals will begin meeting to select a successor to Pope John Paul II behind closed doors in the Vatican's Sistine Chapel. Starting that afternoon, the cardinals will send up smoke signals from the burned ballot papers of the vote to indicate whether they have found a successor. Black smoke means no pope has been elected; white smoke signals a new pope. Tuesday A memorial service will mark the 10th anniversary of the terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building that killed 168 people and injured more than 500 others in Oklahoma City.
FEATURES
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Mark Travers sucks secondhand smoke in the name of science. Since the end of March, the 28-year-old doctoral student at the University at Buffalo has spent 10 nights in 53 watering holes in seven cities - East Coast and West - covertly measuring indoor air pollution, sometimes until the wee hours of the morning. Sure, he got a lot of beer and some burgers out of the deal, but that doesn't make up for the occupational hazard. "Spending eight hours in smoky places, it wasn't all that pleasant," said Travers, who is working on a dissertation about the effects of the smoking ban in New York.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The economy's good. The audiences are more adventurous. The distributors are scrounging for product. And the success stories are coming one after the other.Yes, says Chris Eyre, it's a great day to be an independent filmmaker.Eyre should know. As the director of last year's art-house hit "Smoke Signals," starring Adam Beach and Evan Adams as a pair of Coeur d'Alene Indians on a road trip that reveals a lot of what it means to be a Native American in the 1990s, he's spent the last year basking in the glow that only success can bring.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1999
One day into voting for the 50 greatest African-American films and actors of all time, and 600 ballots had already been cast, Michael Johnson said Wednesday night.The early front-runner among films, according to Johnson, founder of the Heritage Shadows of the Silver Screen Museum and Cinema, was "A Raisin In the Sun," director Daniel Petrie's 1961 adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry's play about an African-American family that moves into an all-white neighborhood.Johnson was speaking to a packed house at the Senator Theatre.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 23, 1998
It's official. "There's Something About Mary," the gross-out comedy starring Ben Stiller and Cameron Diaz, is the sleeper hit of the summer, taking on a mantle that "My Best Friend's Wedding" wore last summer and "Babe" the summer before that.Sleepers - big hits that seem to come out of nowhere, taking film studios, critics and audiences alike by surprise - now seem to be staples of the summer movie season, on a par with the biggest explosions and the most humiliating bomb. But in an age when marketing and publicity are manipulated to within a hair's breadth - when there are computer programs that predict a film's box-office performance before the cameras even start running - is such a thing as an authentic sleeper even possible?
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1999
One day into voting for the 50 greatest African-American films and actors of all time, and 600 ballots had already been cast, Michael Johnson said Wednesday night.The early front-runner among films, according to Johnson, founder of the Heritage Shadows of the Silver Screen Museum and Cinema, was "A Raisin In the Sun," director Daniel Petrie's 1961 adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry's play about an African-American family that moves into an all-white neighborhood.Johnson was speaking to a packed house at the Senator Theatre.
FEATURES
By DANIEL FIENBERG and DANIEL FIENBERG,ZAP2IT.COM | June 2, 2006
LOS ANGELES-- --As most people with access to even rudimentary technology - smoke signals, telegraph - have already heard, Jennifer Aniston separated from husband Brad Pitt back in January 2005 and promptly turned around and signed on for a not-so-romantic comedy titled The Break-Up. "Well, yeah, it's pretty ironic," Aniston says now, when the subject is broached. "You know, at the time it was something I thought about. You know, you kind of can't believe when I first got the call that a movie called The Break-Up is coming.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 17, 1998
"Smoke Signals" may be the most delightfully quirky surprise of the summer, a shaggy-dog tale that from its opening moments the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation portrays the Native American legacy of pride and pain with deep emotion, grace and irreverence.Fans of novelist Sherman Alexie will be gratified that the first feature adaptation of his work so faithfully captures his humor and poetic language. And movie fans in general will be thrilled to meet so many new voices and faces on this enchanting and unexpectedly affecting journey.
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