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Smoke Detector

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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 9, 2012
Baltimore County firefighters have joined other officials in reminding the public to check the batteries in your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors this weekend when you change your clocks for Daylight Savings time (this Sunday at 2 a.m.). The firefighters suggest checking the batteries twice a year, in the spring and fall, when we reset the clocks. They say the smoke alarms are the best way of preventing house and apartment fire deaths. And carbon monoxide detectors can alert you to a deadly odorless gas produced by fuel-burning appliances.
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NEWS
March 10, 2014
The tragic deaths of two children and their father in Curtis Bay last weekend are yet another stark reminder that fire can happen anywhere at any time ( "Children, adult killed in Curtis Bay house fire identified ," March 5). Since the beginning of the year, 12 Maryland residents have lost their lives in home fires. The loss of life will continue unless we spread the message of home fire safety. The National Fire Protection Association reports that nearly two-thirds of home fire deaths result from fires in homes in which no smoke alarm was present or in which one was present but was inoperative.
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EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 8, 2013
Occupants of an Edgewood townhouse escaped without injury Tuesday morning after a fire broke out in the kitchen, according to one of the responding fire companies. At 2:35 a.m., Harford County 9-1-1 received a call for a house fire in the 600 block of Harpark Court, near Edgewood Road, according to a media release from the Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Company, which was alerted to respond at 2:38 a.m., along with the Abingdon Volunteer Fire Company and the Aberdeen Proving Ground Fire Department, Edgewood Station.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
The relatives of five people who were killed in a Baltimore house fire last year sued a landlord and the city housing authority in Circuit Court on Wednesday, claiming that failure to fix a faulty furnace or install smoke detectors led to the fatal blaze. Nancy Worrell, 55, was killed along with four young children in the October fire at 5601 Denwood Ave. The Housing Authority of Baltimore City was paying a portion of the rent on the home through the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher program, and the lawsuit contends that housing authority inspectors should have forced landlord Paul Stanton to fix a malfunctioning furnace in the home and install smoke detectors.
BUSINESS
By George B. Laurent | May 8, 1994
Smoke is deadly. More people die from a fire's smoke than from the fire itself.Maryland requires that each sleeping area in an apartment be provided with at least one approved smoke detector installed in a manner and location approved by the Maryland Fire Prevention Commission.Dwellings built after Jan. 1, 1989, must have at least one smoke detector on each level, including the basement but not the attic. Dwellings built after July 1, 1990, must have smoke detectors that operate off the electrical system but with a battery as backup.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff Joan Jacobson contributed to this story | April 11, 1991
In the wake of a fire that claimed the lives of a woman and two of her sons, city officials are encouraging residents to buy smoke detectors, if they do not have any, or to keep the safety devices in good working order, if they do have them.Capt. Patrick Flynn, fire department spokesman, said a working smoke detector "would have made a difference" in the fire that took the lives yesterday of Ramona Collins, 34, and her two sons, Malcolm King, 18 months, and Martineze King, 6 monthes.A third son, Quincy Collins, 11, remains in critical condition today in the pediatric intensive care unit at the University of Maryland Medical Center, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Tom Gutting and Tom Gutting,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2001
City fire officials yesterday renewed pleas for parents to make sure their homes are equipped with smoke detectors, a day after an 11-year-old boy died in a rowhouse fire in West Baltimore. Investigators announced yesterday that the house where Aaron Hodges died Sunday morning did not have a smoke detector. Investigators had not determined what started the fire, which caused an estimated $25,000 in damage to the rowhouse on the 2500 block of W. Fairmount Ave., said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, a Fire Department spokesman.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff writer | September 29, 1991
The county Department of Fire and Rescue Services, looking for creative ways to battle the recession, is using a "free enterprise" approach that will combine pizzas and public education to prevent fires.Domino's Pizza deliverymen are offering to conduct free inspections of smoke detectors at every residence they deliver to during Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 6-13.If your smoke detector doesn't work, you will receive a coupon for a free 9-volt battery from the nearest county fire station, compliments of the county.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | October 20, 1992
A gift from Howard County Fire and Rescue Services and a group of telephone workers is helping 27-year-old Sharyl Mapp rest easier these days.Ms. Mapp, who has been hearing impaired since birth, received a special smoke detector recently, the first of three strobe-equipped alarms installed by the county's fire prevention division."
NEWS
March 17, 1998
Authorities credited a smoke detector with saving the lives of a New Windsor family when a blaze broke out in a home on Dennings Road early Sunday.David and Patricia Watts were awakened about 4 a.m. by the smoke detector and got their 12-year-old son and 15-month-old daughter out of the house.State fire marshals determined the fire began in an unfinished basement laundry area. A smoldering fire consumed clothing in front of the dryer and sent smoke throughout the house.Firefighters from New Windsor, Westminster and Winfield brought the blaze under control in 15 minutes.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 8, 2013
Occupants of an Edgewood townhouse escaped without injury Tuesday morning after a fire broke out in the kitchen, according to one of the responding fire companies. At 2:35 a.m., Harford County 9-1-1 received a call for a house fire in the 600 block of Harpark Court, near Edgewood Road, according to a media release from the Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Company, which was alerted to respond at 2:38 a.m., along with the Abingdon Volunteer Fire Company and the Aberdeen Proving Ground Fire Department, Edgewood Station.
NEWS
By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
There will be a chill in the air today, but still pleasant enough for the Baltimore Running festival or for fall activities such as visiting the local pumpkin patch. Wear layers as temperatures will go from mid-40s to a high in the low 60s. We had a freeze warning last night over much of central Maryland, a reminder that if you haven't prepared for winter, it is a good time to check on your furnace and change air filters. Another good thing to do is change the battery on your smoke detector.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
The Northeast Baltimore fire that left five people dead Thursday morning underscores the danger of fires in homes without working smoke detectors in a city full of aging, closely built rowhouses, many of which are vacant, fire officials and local academics said. A recent study of 600 homes in East Baltimore showed about 60 percent lacked working smoke detectors on every level. Additionally, one in three households misreported coverage - most often by reporting they had working detectors when they did not, said the study's author, Wendy Shields, an assistant researcher at the Johns Hopkins University's Center for Injury Research and Policy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | March 9, 2012
Baltimore County firefighters have joined other officials in reminding the public to check the batteries in your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors this weekend when you change your clocks for Daylight Savings time (this Sunday at 2 a.m.). The firefighters suggest checking the batteries twice a year, in the spring and fall, when we reset the clocks. They say the smoke alarms are the best way of preventing house and apartment fire deaths. And carbon monoxide detectors can alert you to a deadly odorless gas produced by fuel-burning appliances.
EXPLORE
By Erika Butler, ebutler@theaegis.com | February 15, 2012
From The Aegis dated Feb. 19, 1987: The Harford County public school system 25 years ago was asking for a $10.1 million (11.8 percent) increase in funding from the year before, including a 6 percent across-the-board pay raise for its 3,000 employees. The budget would also add 125 new positions to the school system, including 79 new teachers. The budget request for fiscal 1988 far surpassed other budgets, including an additional $2.7 million provided by the previous county executive and the $4 million from a year earlier.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
After giving his three-story Hampden rental home a quick inspection, firefighters informed Alex McAbee that he only had one smoke detector. And without batteries, it was functioning more as an ugly wall decoration than a safety device. McAbee, 30, standing in the kitchen wearing socks and shorts and cooking an Indian turkey-and-peas dish, asked if there was any kind of charge to have four smoke detectors installed. Nope, firefighter Michael Hineline replied. "Then do what you gotta do," McAbee told them, going back to cooking and giving the firefighters free rein.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
Jessie Kearney moved into her West Baltimore rowhouse a year ago with five grandchildren and one smoke detector. She installed the device in the hallway near the bedrooms on the third floor.But one smoke detector isn't enough.Yesterday, the mayor and fire chief visited her Poppleton home and installed another one of the potentially life-saving devices in her first-floor living room -- the 50,000th detector the Fire Department has given away in the past four years."You're the first person in Baltimore to have a smoke detector installed by the mayor," Fire Chief Herman Williams Jr. told Kearney, explaining that each floor should have a detector.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | April 10, 1991
Michelle Goode says that when she and her two children moved into an apartment at 2302 Ocala Ave. a year ago the first thing she did was ask the landlord to install a smoke detector.The landlord agreed to her request, she said. However, as of today a smoke detector still had not been installed."He keeps on saying, 'Yeah, we're going to put one in there. We're going to do it soon,' " Goode said. "This has been going on for a year now."Goode, 26, was not the only tenant in the three-story, six-apartment building that did not have a smoke detector.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2011
Firefighters were called to Hampden for a two-alarm house fire Tuesday afternoon, fire officials said. Flames broke out at about 2 p.m. in the first floor of an occupied three-story home in the 3700 block of Roland Ave. and continued to the second floor, said Kevin Cartwright, a Fire Department spokesman. It took firefighters about 45 minutes to bring the blaze under control, Cartwright said. One firefighter got debris in his eye and was taken to the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital, but no other injuries were reported, he said.
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