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By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 18, 1994
AN astonishing scene unfolded early this month at the United States' greatest cultural guardian, the Smithsonian Institution.The chiefs of the Smithsonian stood silently. They listened while Hispanic activists accused them of "willful neglect" of "Latinos" and grandiosely demanded everything from the establishment of one or more museums about themselves to a special office for (yet again!) "multicultural initiatives."The articles about the event uniformly described the Smithsonian "keepers" -- men such as Smithsonian Secretary Robert McCormick Adams, as well as others distinguished in their fields -- as looking "glum."
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
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FEATURES
By Michael Hill | February 13, 1991
Picture the museum of the 22nd century. After you've gone through the ancient Romans and Greeks, the Byzantines, the Gothic, the renaissance, the baroque, rococo and realists, on through the Impressionists, painting would virtually disappear from the walls after, say, the abstract expressionists.Instead, you would enter a room featuring technology. Video screens would be on the walls in place of the paintings. And at each you would pause and watch 30- or 60-second television commercials, the highest and most important art form of the second half of the 20th century.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Old photographs, newspapers and other miscellaneous "gay pride ephemera" from the last half-century of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history in Baltimore will be added on Tuesday to one of the nation's most esteemed museum collections. Officials at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History will accept the archival materials from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB), and add them to its growing collection of items documenting LGBT history.
FEATURES
By LORNE MANLY and LORNE MANLY,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2006
As the recent coupling between the Smithsonian Institution and Showtime Networks continues to roil the documentary film world, more than 215 filmmakers, television executives and academics have signed a letter demanding that the Smithsonian, a publicly financed museum, not only reveal financial details of the joint venture but also abandon it. The signers of the letter, delivered yesterday to a Smithsonian official, include filmmakers Michael Moore (Fahrenheit...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 21, 1992
HOUSTON -- William L. "Larry" Bird, a curator for the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History in Washington, was thrilled with his find."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 22, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The line outside the bathroom at the National Portrait Gallery has been out the door since museum officials decided to hang a portrait of late-night host Stephen Colbert in between the men's and women's restrooms. "The lines have been extraordinary," museum director Marc Pachter said yesterday as he prepared to end his 33-year tenure with the Smithsonian Institution. "A friend e-mailed that it was good I was leaving with my dignity." Colbert, who plays an egotistical conservative host on his Comedy Central show, The Colbert Report, has made a running joke of his campaign to get his portrait into the Smithsonian.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - The long-raging conflict between Smithsonian Secretary Lawrence Small and the 156-year-old institution's scholars and scientists has been resolved, largely in favor of the scientists. A report prepared by 18 of the nation's leading science experts urged that scientific research at the Smithsonian be strengthened and expanded, rather than curtailed to accommodate fiscal constraints. It warned, however, that the taxpayer-supported Smithsonian is seriously underfunded and needs new revenue sources.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 25, 1992
SUITLAND -- Thousands of artifacts housed at a Smithsonian Institution storage facility here were waterlogged and possibly ruined by a small tornado that struck the complex early Monday morning.Historical furniture, insect collections, canoes, totem poles and sculptures were among items Smithsonian officials identified as damaged by the storm, which struck eight of 27 buildings at the suburban Washington site, two of them severely.Officials said it would take several months to determine the cost of restoring the items.
NEWS
By THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS | September 5, 2004
NEW YORK - Yesterday's convention castoffs could be tomorrow's Smithsonian exhibit. Larry Bird and Harry Rubenstein want the hats off delegates' heads, the buttons off their lapels and the posters that were discarded at the door. Where others see goofy political gewgaws, these Smithsonian Institution curators see history. Every four years, they prowl the conventions, politely inquiring whether delegates might consider parting with their political paraphernalia. "Sometimes you're just met with this incredulous look," Bird said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lily Hua and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
As the head bartender and mixologist at B&O American Brasserie, Brendan Dorr, 34, has concocted drinks for every type of occasion for his restaurant's guests. But in September, Dorr will have the chance that only 14 mixologists from around the country have: showcasing a concoction at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The National Museum of American History and Smithsonian Channel are toasting to the 200 th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner with an event called Raise a Glass to History.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
It what could be truly considered a tourism manager's dream, Havre de Grace has made Smithsonian Magazine's list of "The Best 20 Small Towns to Visit in 2014. " The April edition of Smithsonian places Havre de Grace at No. 12 on the list, just behind Spring Green, Wisc., and just ahead of Columbia, Pa. The complete list can be viewed online at http://www.smithsonianmag.com . Brigitte Peters, manager of the city's Office of Marketing and Tourism, calls the selection "exciting," one that she says should benefit the entire state of Maryland, other towns and counties, as well as Havre de Grace and Harford County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
A year of events celebrating the 200 t h anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner kicked off Thursday with the unveiling of a commemorative stamp. The newest installment of the popular "forever" stamps - so named because they continue to be valid even if the cost of postage rises - features Old Glory in front of scarlet and white fireworks representing the "rockets' red glare" described in the national anthem. The stamp was introduced at a ceremony in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, according to a Maryland Historical Society news release.
NEWS
Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Some things just naturally go together, like peanut butter and jelly. This summer, Francis Scott Key's original manuscript for "The Star-Spangled Banner" - America's national anthem - will be reunited for the first time with the flag that inspired it. "The National Museum of American History is proud to be the home of the iconic Star-Spangled Banner, the flag that inspired Francis Scott Key in 1814 to write passionate lyrics after the relentless...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
Because of budget cuts mandated by the federal sequestration, the Smithsonian Institution will begin closing galleries in some art museums to the public. Smithsonian Secretary Wayne Clough said Tuesday in a news release that the temporary closings would begin May 1 and would continue through Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year. He said that the closings are necessary because a hiring freeze has reduced the number of security guards available to patrol galleries. The Smithsonian is losing 5 percent of its federal budget from March through September, or about $41 million.
TRAVEL
By Zach Sparks, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Whether you're stuffing your face with a KFC Double Down sandwich or watching Gordon Ramsay roast professional chefs on "Hell's Kitchen," you're sharing in one of society's biggest obsessions: food. "Food is hot," said Paula Johnson, curator for the new exhibit "FOOD: Transforming the American Table, 1950-2000," which opened recently in Washington. "It's a topic people are very interested in, as evidenced by TV, books and blogs. " Johnson's exhibit, on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, examines the transformation of food and the ways it has shaped American culture.
FEATURES
By Chuck Myers and Chuck Myers,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 23, 1993
They show us where to find the roads less traveled, which direction the river flows and how to locate the stars -- both in the heavens and their homes in Hollywood.From cave man to cosmonaut, maps have served to satisfy centuries of curiosity about the world and universe around us. Now, the Smithsonian Institution explores the fascinating realm of maps with a remarkable exhibition that showcases many unique and rare maps and explores how the art of cartography has evolved."The Power of Maps," on display inside the Smithsonian's S. Dillon Ripley Center, contains more than 200 maps in all shapes and sizes from many different corners of the world.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2000
RAILWAY HISTORY is putting the town of Sykesville on the map. The town, which was once a stop along the main line of the B&O Railroad, was the destination of a Smithsonian tour group Saturday. About two dozen railroad buffs participated in the tour sponsored by the Smithsonian Associates, a group that organizes and promotes tours for the Smithsonian Institution. The group traveled by bus from Washington to visit Sykesville & Patapsco Railway's train museum, Sykesville Gate House Museum of History and have lunch at Baldwin's Station.
NEWS
July 1, 2012
TOM ROBERTS, 75, Smithsonian's 'Mr. Anonymous' The name "Tom Roberts" appears on no plaque in the Smithsonian Institution's musical instruments collection. At no concert, even when Mr. Roberts was in attendance, did Smithsonian chamber musicians reveal that he was one of their greatest benefactors. Among museum curators, he was known as "Mr. Anonymous. " Only a few of his closest acquaintances knew that for nearly two decades, Mr. Roberts owned one of the most prized instruments in the world — the "Hellier" violin crafted by Antonio Stradivari at the end of the 17th century.
LIFESTYLE
By Edward Gents, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
When the country's largest museum devoted to African-American history and culture opens in Washington, Maryland people and places will get a healthy share of the limelight. A two-story log house built by freed slaves from Montgomery County, dubbed the Freedom House, is one of the largest single objects planned for display inside the $500 million museum, for which ground was broken Wednesday. Other Maryland-related objects include a silk shawl given to abolitionist Harriet Tubman by Britain's Queen Victoria, a hymn book used by Tubman and a first edition of abolitionist Frederick Douglass' autobiography.
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